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Moving day

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webfoot

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I have the only bridge on the river for miles. One of my neighbor's cows calf on the road side of the river and his range land is on the other side. This time of the year the river is too high for young calves to cross. So they herd the cows and calves up the road, down my driveway, across the bridge, through a field, and up the hill about a mile to his property. Today was moving day. Four people horseback, 2 quads, and one side by side. 150 pairs are up in the hills until next fall.
Side note. One of the riders was in 4H with Nicky. I am sure that was only about 5 or 6 years ago. And Nicky if you see this you might recognize that long blonde braid on the gal on the buckskin horse.
 

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Evans

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Lot of time and money into that white fence!
I can't get over how early you guys are putting your cows into the hills down there. Its like other threads about branding and lots around here are just starting to calve.
 

webfoot

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Lot of time and money into that white fence!
I can't get over how early you guys are putting your cows into the hills down there. Its like other threads about branding and lots around here are just starting to calve.
That white fence was here when we bought the place. I don't like that plastic stuff at all but the wife likes it. So until something takes out a big piece it will get to stay. I just hope it isn't me that accidentally wipes it out.
 

leanin' H

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Y'all have green grass. Ya best count your blessings :)
Moving those cattle across the bridge brought back a bad memory from a few years ago. I was helping the LDS church ranch gather a big meadow to work the calves. They have a lot of "volunteers" who have big hearts and very little experience around cattle. The ranch manager calls from time to time and asks for help. (I have found that he is about the most patient person alive. But when he calls, its because he is in a bind, and really could use the help) The big meadow we gathered is a couple miles long and is dissected by a creek that's about 15-20 feet wide and 3-4 feet deep. The new calves cant cross it, so we pushed them all north to a bridge. 400 pairs make quite the bunch and anyone with any sense knows ya cant force new calves without a wreck. The volunteers started whooping and hollering and crowding the bunch which helped about as much as pouring gasoline on a brush fire. Calves were scattered and cows were headed off on a trot leaving them behind. We ended up with 60 motherless calves on the wrong side of the creek. One real fine "cowboy" had four- day old calves stuffed out on a little finger of land whipping them as hard as he could with his coiled rope trying to get them to jump into the creek! I had a come apart! I bailed off my horse fully intending to tip him off his horse and stomp him some. But i didn't want to embarrass my friend who manages the ranch, so i just cussed him out pretty good. It musta been quite a shock because he didn't have one word of reply. (another blessing because i was mad enough to do some dentistry work if he'd said much) I grabbed a calf and carried him across the creek on foot, cussing the guy the entire time. Three more trips got the calves across and me wet and mad. All the volunteers were quiet as mice and staring at the dirt. We got the bunch across the creek and in the wire trap where we could sort off the cows. I could tell i was not very popular so i just kept my distance and went to work where needed. We stopped for a bite at lunch, and i guess a few of them decided it was time to address my cussing on a church project. Bad Idea! I asked them what they would do if they saw someone whipping a newborn child with a coiled rope? They stammered a bit and said they would intervene. I said "What the hell do ya think i was doing?" The guy i cussed stayed far away from me and never made eye contact. The ranch manager heard about it later as he was setting up the corrals and wasn't around to see what had happened. He came to my house to apologize and said he'd of felt just like i did. I feel bad for losing my temper, but i'd do it again in a minute if i saw it happen again. Years later i was at some church leadership meetings and i ran into a guy who had been there helping that day. He approached me and told me he had regretted not getting more involved, but wasn't experienced enough to know what happened was wrong. And then he smiled and said i taught him a few new words and combination of swear words he never thought of putting together.

I'm glad that your neighbors crossed the river without as much drama
 

webfoot

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I'm glad that your neighbors crossed the river without as much drama
The neighbor who owns the cows and the other neighbors who helped are all ranch raised. All good hands both on horses and with cows.
For some reason which I am still trying to figure out, on facebook I am in a group called "the cowboy way". The vast majority of the people on it wouldn't have a clue about being a cowboy. I posted the same story and pictures there. After about 500 likes and 40 or so comments I just couldn't take it any more. So I commented that John Wayne doesn't work. No shouting and running your horse. Just walk. A very slow walk and often stop and stand. Two hours to cover two and a half miles. Then stand quietly for a hour while holding them in a bunch to mother up. I didn't cuss anyone but suddenly the comments stopped.
 

Haytrucker

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Preaching to the choir I know, but the fastest way to move cattle is a tad slower than they want to travel. Processing maybe a click slower than that. I'm grateful I have lived long enough to see this proven over and over.
While shipping some fall pairs home last week a bull got out through an open trucker gate, no reason, it was just open. Owner of the cattle and a driver were up there. An hour and change later we walked him back in through the trailer load out because he didn't want to go to the bottom of the pens where there were no cattle. We used a pickup and trailer and the pot as a temporary pen and my bale bed as a wing. The owner said he couldn't believe I didn't blow up in the process. I told him we didn't have time to rile that bull. I hadn't given it a thought, just needed to get the truck loaded.
 

Nicky

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It's hard to miss Kathy's braid! 5 or 6 years, lol!! We've been by twice in the last week. My cousin in Idaho was sick and passed away so we went to see her, then yesterday to the funeral. Can't believe that your grass isn't any better than ours (at least from the road). Saw lots of cows turned out with not much to eat between here and Ontario. Can you see your place from the freeway?
 

webfoot

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It's hard to miss Kathy's braid! 5 or 6 years, lol!! We've been by twice in the last week. My cousin in Idaho was sick and passed away so we went to see her, then yesterday to the funeral. Can't believe that your grass isn't any better than ours (at least from the road). Saw lots of cows turned out with not much to eat between here and Ontario. Can you see your place from the freeway?
You can't see the house from the freeway. There is a rocky point that sticks out in the valley hiding the buildings. Out in the front field I can see the trucks going by but it is a good 3 miles away. Grass in the hills isn't very good. Too cold at night and a little shot of rain wouldn't hurt.
 

Mountain Cowgirl

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Talk of the Burnt River and bridges reminds me of this old postcard.
BR 1906.jpg

JIm.jpg

@webfoot If I remember right there weren't many bridges on the Burnt when I was in the area 30 years ago. I have you placed a bit north and west of Durkee by the Bear photo, but your other photos lead me to believe you are south and a bit to the west. It has been way too many years.

@Nicky I knew of a Kathy that had long braided blonde hair but she lived in the Unity area. I can't remember her last name just the long braid coming out the back of her cap. That would be over 40 years ago. I was in a group taking cattle up 245 to range on Dooley.
 
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webfoot

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There is the bridge at the cement plant, one on Oxman lane down behind the old school, and then my driveway. Next one up stream is at Bridgeport. About 15 miles up stream. By the map the river going up stream is basically west. But there are a lot of twists and turns.
 

Nicky

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I don't think she lived in Unity then, her maiden name is Flack, her married name is Thompson
 

webfoot

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Y'all have green grass. Ya best count your blessings :)
That green grass is domestic grass in the irrigated hay meadow. They held up there for a bit to let them mother up. I didn't see any mothering going on. Just eating.
There is a pretty big reservoir up stream a ways. Both of the withdrawals from the river are on my property. Bert says it is better to be the first one on the ditch with a sharp shovel than to be down the ditch with a better irrigation right. Actually my irrigation rights date back to 1873.
 

leanin' H

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I hope y’all get the moisture ya need for a fine grass year. That eastern Oregon country is on my bucket list to come for a look see someday soon. Nicky runs cattle in almost the same high desert country we do. I should be outside finishing up a new irrigation main line but it rained/sleeted/snowed all day. No complaints from me
 

Soapweed

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Y'all have green grass. Ya best count your blessings :)
Moving those cattle across the bridge brought back a bad memory from a few years ago. I was helping the LDS church ranch gather a big meadow to work the calves. They have a lot of "volunteers" who have big hearts and very little experience around cattle. The ranch manager calls from time to time and asks for help. (I have found that he is about the most patient person alive. But when he calls, its because he is in a bind, and really could use the help) The big meadow we gathered is a couple miles long and is dissected by a creek that's about 15-20 feet wide and 3-4 feet deep. The new calves cant cross it, so we pushed them all north to a bridge. 400 pairs make quite the bunch and anyone with any sense knows ya cant force new calves without a wreck. The volunteers started whooping and hollering and crowding the bunch which helped about as much as pouring gasoline on a brush fire. Calves were scattered and cows were headed off on a trot leaving them behind. We ended up with 60 motherless calves on the wrong side of the creek. One real fine "cowboy" had four- day old calves stuffed out on a little finger of land whipping them as hard as he could with his coiled rope trying to get them to jump into the creek! I had a come apart! I bailed off my horse fully intending to tip him off his horse and stomp him some. But i didn't want to embarrass my friend who manages the ranch, so i just cussed him out pretty good. It musta been quite a shock because he didn't have one word of reply. (another blessing because i was mad enough to do some dentistry work if he'd said much) I grabbed a calf and carried him across the creek on foot, cussing the guy the entire time. Three more trips got the calves across and me wet and mad. All the volunteers were quiet as mice and staring at the dirt. We got the bunch across the creek and in the wire trap where we could sort off the cows. I could tell i was not very popular so i just kept my distance and went to work where needed. We stopped for a bite at lunch, and i guess a few of them decided it was time to address my cussing on a church project. Bad Idea! I asked them what they would do if they saw someone whipping a newborn child with a coiled rope? They stammered a bit and said they would intervene. I said "What the hell do ya think i was doing?" The guy i cussed stayed far away from me and never made eye contact. The ranch manager heard about it later as he was setting up the corrals and wasn't around to see what had happened. He came to my house to apologize and said he'd of felt just like i did. I feel bad for losing my temper, but i'd do it again in a minute if i saw it happen again. Years later i was at some church leadership meetings and i ran into a guy who had been there helping that day. He approached me and told me he had regretted not getting more involved, but wasn't experienced enough to know what happened was wrong. And then he smiled and said i taught him a few new words and combination of swear words he never thought of putting together.

I'm glad that your neighbors crossed the river without as much drama
Darrell, your story reminds me of a visit I had with a lady in Valentine today. In her conversation, Kay mentioned that she had recently been at a Walmart. A man and a woman were ahead of her in an aisle, and they were arguing quite loudly. My friend wasn't quite sure why she did it, but she hollered, "Stop it!!" The couple were somewhat taken aback, and both looked at my friend. Kay asked, "Are you married?" They said that they were. Kay addressed the lady, "Well then, quit talking to your husband that way. It isn't nice!" Kay walked along her way, quite surprised at herself for interfering in the domestic argument.
 

webfoot

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That face book group, "the Cowboy Way" is now over 1,000 likes and 80+ comments on the pictures of this move. The ones that really amaze me are all the comments on what a "great neighbor" I am. For what? I set up a couple panels to turn the cows off the driveway and into the field. I parked my rear on my quad on the road to turn the herd down the driveway. Not what I wold call work. For letting the man bring his cows across my place? Who wouldn't do that?
I finally had to comment that they must all be city people who right close to a lot of people but are not friends or neighbors with any of them. I told them that they need to be the kind of neighbor that that would want to have if they expect to have good neighbors.
 

Mountain Cowgirl

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Which Facebook "The Cowboy Way" group are you referring to? There are about 4 groups with the same name and only one is open to the public and the others are private. I was a member for a short time of one of the private groups but left because they claimed it was for real cowboys and cowgirls only, but most were just horse people and rodeo folk. Some got offended because I said if you haven't ever worked cattle for a living, then you are not a cattle person IE cowboy, or cowgirl.

If I had a Benjamin for every time I have told someone I grew up and worked on and around cattle ranches for 50 years daily and the last 20 on the edge town where I walk by cattle pastures and alfalfa fields daily and so yes you can call me a cowgirl, and they said, "well you sure don't look like one," then I could buy me a registered 14 hands Paint and some fancy duds, take singing lessons, and sing "I got friends in lowly places, " only an octave higher. I would choose 14 hands because I have only one balance nerve and falling off is a given and the lesser distance I have to fall, the better my chances of continuing my brag of no broken bones ever. I gave up steer riding at my Grandpa's annual cousins ranch rodeo at age 14. I was lucky to land in the water trough and have the water break my fall. I did cut my arm on the edge of the trough. I had already made my decision before Grandma laid down the law. No one ever broke a Grandma law. If they did I never knew about it. I suspect I may have had more cousins. Grandma did have the most amazing bed of daisies.
 

webfoot

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I have no idea which Cowboy Way it is. I was invited to join by a friend. She is no way a cowboy although she was raised on an irrigated farm in the Columbia Basin. But the group does have some Christian posts which is how she went there. I started off by offending them when I told them that Gene Autry was a actor and singer but he wasn't a cowboy. That didn't sit too well with some of them. Several pointed out that old Gene owned a ranch. So I listed off a number of Hollywood actors who own ranches. I just know I will have to point that out about John Wayne one day. That will really cause hate and discontent. (I do like John Wayne. He played a pretty good cowboy) There are very few actual cattle people in that group. A lot of horse owner types. And a lot of people who have watched western movies and think that it would be the life to live. I don't know why I have stayed there. I guess so I can post pictures of what happens here and get a laugh at the responses I get.
 

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