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mustang

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We've been hunting my favorite paint mare and her band sense the first of the year, with no luck. We did find her buckskin colt, who had a palomino colt with her about a month ago. Today we were in that same area, but no buckskin. We did find a paint mare that H' had seen about two weeks ago. That band had about fifty head in it. They were so spooky that we had a hard time getting close enough for pictures. They didn't like the 4-wheeler noise at all, which caused a lot of hoofing it.

Another six miles up the country, we found what we were looking for. They took off when we got within a half mile. Another long walk made the day worthwhile. When we came up over the ridge, It was a beautiful sight, 75 head, grazing in a little green valley, what more could you ask for.

25thApril2012DavisMtn090.jpg


The paint mare and some of her family.
25thApril2012DavisMtn132.jpg


We found out that the BLM had rounded them up last February. You can see the freeze brand on her neck and on her hip. She still looked pretty good to me. I was afraid that they would not turn her back out.

25thApril2012DavisMtn146.jpg


Some of the mares have new colts, It looks like she will have one soon.
25thApril2012DavisMtn192.jpg


The paint mares last year colt and his cousin.
25thApril2012DavisMtn179.jpg


Is ten feet close enough?
25thApril2012DavisMtn184.jpg


What would you call this color?
25thApril2012DavisMtn173.jpg


Just taking it easy.
25thApril2012DavisMtn156.jpg


I'll scratch you back,, if you scratch mine.
25thApril2012DavisMtn166.jpg


25thApril2012DavisMtn160.jpg


25thApril2012DavisMtn152.jpg

"Another good day at Blackrock."
 

Faster horses

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Great pictures. Neat subject. What one did you want to know the
color of? The one below the question is a buckskin or a dun;
the one above the picture, I'm really not sure what color it is.
Maybe a light dun--that color isn't very common. I wonder if it
could be the result of inbreeding? I really don't care for that
particular color. It isn't cremello...hummm...I hope someone knows
as I'd like to know.


(Maybe that's the color of the 'pale horse that death rides.' Now
there's a cheery thought.) :?

Thanks for the pictures. Neat that you were looking for the paint
mare and was able to find her. Why would the BLM not turn her
back out? Age?
 

mustang

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Faster horses said:
Great pictures. Neat subject. What one did you want to know the
color of? The one below the question is a buckskin or a dun;
the one above the picture, I'm really not sure what color it is.
Maybe a light dun--that color isn't very common. I wonder if it
could be the result of inbreeding? I really don't care for that
particular color. It isn't cremello...hummm...I hope someone knows
as I'd like to know.


(Maybe that's the color of the 'pale horse that death rides.' Now
there's a cheery thought.) :?

Thanks for the pictures. Neat that you were looking for the paint
mare and was able to find her. Why would the BLM not turn her
back out? Age?

The one below the question. I've not seen anything quite like him. But there is one different colored palomino colt out there. He has black legs and belly.

I was worried that the BLM might think the paints would be easier to adopt out than the solid color horses. I'm glad they paroled her, the paints sure look better in pictures.

2011Dec20DavisMtn047.jpg
 

Faster horses

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He's a buckskin or a dun. I call them buckskins, but some are
registered as duns. Zebra dun has a black stripe down the back
to the tail,
black stripes on the legs and most times black stripes down
each shoulder. I don't see that on this one. He is a pretty color tho.
 

leanin' H

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My daugher got a movie with Tim McGraw in it called Flicka? Something like that, anyway it has a part where the main girl character spouts off about how ranchers hated mustangs and killed them and they were useless! :mad: I stopped the movie and got out the scrapbook to show the kids the mustangs their grandparents rode. And explained how they were a huge part of the ranch. The federal government hired guys to shoot wild horses and some ranchers might of done it too. But in our country, before the BLM became God (in their own minds), mustangs were an important resource. They provided lots of good using horses on ranches all over the west. Now they round them up every 5 years or so and select some to try to adopt off. They end up standing around in a feedlot as the horse market fell through the basement. There are thousands of "wild" horses being fed by the BLM eveyday. What a crock! And if a guy even thought about catching a couple colts to use, they'd hunt him down and throw away the key!

Great shots of the broomtails Mr. Mustang! :D I'd call that color of horse a honey palamino.
 

mustang

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After taking note of that buckskin mare, I've about decided that the colt in both pictures is the same colt. The mare's main and tail are comparable and the white spot on her forehead is similar. The right hind foot and the pink nose are similar too. What do ya think?
 

Faster horses

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Great shots of the broomtails Mr. Mustang! I'd call that color of horse a honey palamino.

H, I don't think that color can be called palamino. Palamino has to have
a white or flaxen mane and tail.

Mustang, I can't find the colt you are talking about.
 

mustang

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I have trouble making computers do what I want them to do.

Take a look at these pictures and tell me if you agree it is the same colt and mare.

25thApril2012DavisMtn173-1.jpg


2011Dec20DavisMtn044.jpg


2011Dec20DavisMtn047.jpg
 

Shortgrass

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leanin' H said:
My daugher got a movie with Tim McGraw in it called Flicka? Something like that, anyway it has a part where the main girl character spouts off about how ranchers hated mustangs and killed them and they were useless! :mad: I stopped the movie and got out the scrapbook to show the kids the mustangs their grandparents rode. And explained how they were a huge part of the ranch. The federal government hired guys to shoot wild horses and some ranchers might of done it too. But in our country, before the BLM became God (in their own minds), mustangs were an important resource. They provided lots of good using horses on ranches all over the west. Now they round them up every 5 years or so and select some to try to adopt off. They end up standing around in a feedlot as the horse market fell through the basement. There are thousands of "wild" horses being fed by the BLM eveyday. What a crock! And if a guy even thought about catching a couple colts to use, they'd hunt him down and throw away the key!

Great shots of the broomtails Mr. Mustang! :D I'd call that color of horse a honey palamino.

A cousin of dad's told of a story or riding a mustang off the side of a mountain while after a wild steer. His stirrup leather had broke, and one stirrup was hanging over the horn. This little black mare jumped a cedar tree below her, and there was a prospect hole on the other side. Her front feet were on good ground, but the back feet must have been about down the hole. Duley said he could feel her scrambling, and eventually climb out. He was glad to have the sure footed mustang under him that day! They were, indeed, a valuable resource to the early cattlemen.
 

Faster horses

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EXTREME MUSTANG CHALLENGE
This was in 2007, but this competition is still going on today.

http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-news/extreme-mustang-challenge.aspx

Trainer Guy Woods with Max, winners of the Extreme Mustang Challenge


Guy Woods, who trains cutting horses out of Double E Ranches in Texas, took the challenge and won: He was the most successful at gentling a wild Mustang after 100 days of training during the Extreme Mustang Challenge.

Making the decision to take on the Extreme Mustang Makeover challenge wasn't a hard one for Woods, even though more than one of his cutting horse friends raised a skeptical eyebrow. "I wanted to do this because I thought it would be fun," he said. "When I left Australia and came to America, I was the top-ranked youth rider in Victoria. Riding in this competition made me feel like a kid again."

The Extreme Mustang Challenge began months ago, with an invitation to every horse trainer in America asking them if they would like to participate in a test of horsemanship and an opportunity to win $25,000 in prize money.

Once the list of Extreme Mustang Challenge participants was narrowed to 100, the Mustang Heritage Foundation, in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management and the Nevada Wild Horse and Burro Commission, brought 100 wild Mustangs from the Nevada hills to the Fallon BLM holding facility in Nevada and the Pauls Valley facility south of Oklahoma City. The Mustangs were all similar in age, size and condition.

The participating trainers picked up their Mustangs from either the Fallon or Pauls Valley facility during the week of June 6-9, 2007. They had until Sept. 22, 2007 to train their mounts. On that date, the trainers competed with their Mustangs at the Will Rogers Equestrian Center in Fort Worth, Texas. The trainers and their horses were judged on conditioning, groundwork and a “horse course,” which represented maneuvers and obstacles found in trail and recreational riding situations.

"When I first saw Max, I was in line to pick up my horse and all the horses I saw were wild, but they were loading pretty smoothly," Woods says. "But when Max came through, he went into the chute and tried to come out the other side. I said load him."

Woods, who has professionally trained cutting horses for almost 30 years and has won numerous National Cutting Horse Association honors, worked with Max at the end of almost every day after riding 15 other horses. "I'd work him after I got all my other horses ridden and for the first 60 days or so, it was challenging and a lot of fun. Then for the last 40 days, it was a matter of keeping him ridden and fine tuning a lot of the things we'd worked on."

The Mustang Heritage Foundation (MHF), in partnership with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), created the Extreme Mustang Makeover event to highlight the recognized value of Mustangs through the national training competition.

All Mustangs that participated in the Extreme Mustang Makeover were available for adoption on September 23. The horse that fetched the highest adoption fee was Hail Yeah ridden by Norco, Calif.-trainer Ray Ariss. Hail Yeah was adopted for $50,000, which makes him the highest-priced Mustang in the history of the BLM’s adoption program. Partnering on the fee was the City of Norco, Calif., represented by Mayor Harvey Sullivan and the MHF.

Ariss, who trains mostly Andalusians and Friesians for dressage, went off pattern during the horse course and received a zero for that portion of the competition.

"I hated that I didn't have the opportunity to show the judges what this horse could really do,” Ariss says. “I've been in a lot of competitions and this one was different because it was definitely not about me. I knew there was some really good horsemen here and that I would need to step up and compete."

Ariss says he was pleasantly surprised by the high adoption fee for Hail Yeah. Sullivan, who traveled to Fort Worth to support Ariss and Hail Yeah, says that Hail Yeah will be the official mascot of Norco.
In addition to prize money, trainers were reimbursed up to $500 for costs related to hauling, training and medical expenses for the Mustangs in training. Trainers also received 15 percent commission on the amount of the adoption bids exceeding $200.
 

mustang

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Faster horses said:
Yes I do. Most certainly. They are both a pretty color.

There are a couple of grulla colts laying down under your
caption of 'taking it easy.' That is an odd color, that you don't
see real often.

In this part of the world those line backs are found on the original Spanish Barb. They also have dark colored stripes around the backs of their front legs. The Mustang purists will pay top dollar for Barbs. I haven't seen any in this band. I'll have to pay more attention.
 

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