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NCBA Finally Speaks Again- But where do they Stand?

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Anonymous

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Beef News
NCBA wants "provisionally free" designation from OIE

by Pete Hisey on 3/21/05 for Meatingplace.com



The National Cattlemen's Beef Association has urged the U.S. Department of Agriculture to push the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) to reclassify the United States as "provisionally free" of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

In the letter, addressed to Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns, NCBA notes "we meet all of the criteria established by the OIE for such a designation." The association says that the closure of export markets has cost the beef industry about $175 per animal in added value and a total of $4.5 billion in the nearly 15 months since the discovery of a diseased animal in Washington state. That animal, however, had been born in Canada, and probably was first infected there.

"As our expanded BSE surveillance program approaches the target of 268,500 cattle, it illustrates even more profoundly why one imported cow with BSE should not have affected our BSE status or our international trade status," the letter reads, in part. "At this level of testing, the prevalence of BSE in the United States, if present at all, must be less than one in 10 million cattle over 24 months, with a confidence level of 99 percent."
 
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Legal/Regulatory News
NCBA applauds USDA's appeal

by Anna Blessing on 3/21/05 for Meatingplace.com



Following the U.S. Department of Agricultures decision to appeal U.S. District Court injunction of BSE minimal-risk rule, The National Cattleman's Beef Association released a statement, saying the appeal will speed resolution of the issue and help to return the debate to a discussion of science and fact, rather than politically-motivated litigation.

USDA filed a request with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit that the court overturn the decision issued by U.S. District Court in Montana. The decision granted a preliminary injunction to delay the implementation of USDA's minimal-risk regions rule, which would re-establish trade with Canada for beef products and live cattle under 30 months of age.

NCBA also said that it has outlined eleven key issues that must be addressed before the Canadian border is re-opened, adding that this litigation has pre-empted its ability to resolve those issues.
 

Tommy

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quote...NCBA also said that it has outlined eleven key issues that must be addressed before the Canadian border is re-opened, adding that this litigation has pre-empted its ability to resolve those issues.


How in the hell has this litigation pre-empted it? Number 11 stated that the US have trade resumed with Japan, Korea, and Mexico before the border is open to live cattle from Canada.
If there was no litigation the border would have been open March 7th. We damn sure didn't have trade resumed with Japan, Korea, and Mexico.

The NCBA has sure done a 180 on these issues.
 
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