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Bill

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NCBA Statement on USDA Announcement of BSE Case
Terry Stokes, Chief Executive Officer
National Cattlemen's Beef Association

"A short time ago, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it has confirmed a case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad cow disease) in a cow born before the FDA feed ban.

"The animal did not enter the human food or animal feed supply.

"The bottom line for consumers remains the same: Your beef is safe. Scientists, medical professionals and government officials agree that BSE is not a public health risk in the United States. BSE infectivity has not been found in beef, including steaks, roasts and ground beef.

"Since June 2004, the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program has tested more than 388,000 targeted animals at highest risk for BSE and has found only this case, which confirms estimates that the prevalence of this disease in the U.S. cattle population must be extremely low.

"But as far back as the late 1980s, the U.S. government and cattle industry have taken precautions to protect public and animal health from BSE.

"To keep our beef supply safe, USDA mandates removal from the food supply materials that would most likely carry the BSE agent (such as brain and spinal cord). This process happens every day with every animal to ensure this diminishing disease has no affect on public health.

"To protect our cattle, one of the most important measures undertaken is the FDA feed ban, which was championed by cattlemen and became law in 1997. The feed ban prohibits feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. BSE is not contagious; the disease is only known to spread through feed so the feed ban breaks the cycle and helps assure the disease will be eliminated. As USDA Secretary Johanns said in the announcement today, 'BSE is becoming very rare,' like 'searching for a needle in the haystack,' because of the effectiveness of the feed ban.

"We support Secretary Johann's recommendations and thorough review of the testing protocol. It is important to remember this sample went through a rigorous testing protocol prior to this determination, and that all other samples tested in the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program - more than 388,000 - have tested negative.

"Because U.S. beef is safe from BSE, this announcement should not affect ongoing discussion to reopen the border for beef trade and we urge USDA to do everything within its power to send that message to our trading partners.

"As America's beef producers, our number-one priority has always been providing the safest beef in the world. Our livelihood depends on it and NCBA has worked with the government and top scientists for more than 15 years to build, maintain and expand the safeguards that today are protecting consumers and our cattle from BSE."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Additional Information:
The government has built and maintained four effective firewalls to ensure that U.S. beef remains safe from BSE:

In 2003, USDA strengthened its food safety program by banning from the human food supply any cattle that are unable to walk. Cattle showing signs of possible neurological disease always have been banned from the food supply. The USDA also prohibited from the food supply anything that could potentially carry BSE.

In 1996, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association launched a voluntary feed ban, which established an industry standard against feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. In 1997, with our support, the FDA made the ban mandatory.

In 1990, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to begin a BSE Surveillance and Testing program.

In 1989, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to ban imports of beef, cattle products and cattle from countries where BSE is prevalent.
To learn more about BSE, information can found at the following Web sites:

Centers for Disease Control Q&A: www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/bse_cjd_qa.htm

Food and Drug Administration Q&A: www.fda.gov/cber/bse/bseqa.htm#a1

U.S. Department of Agriculture Q&A: www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse_q&a.html

Beef Industry Scientific Panel Information Resource: www.BSEinfo.org

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
USDA ANNOUNCES BSE TEST RESULTS AND NEW BSE CONFIRMATORY TESTING PROTOCOL
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has received final test results from The Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Weybridge, England, confirming that a sample from an animal that was blocked from the food supply in November 2004 has tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Johanns also directed USDA scientists to work with international experts to thoughtfully develop a new protocol that includes performing dual confirmatory tests in the event of another "inconclusive" BSE screening test.

"We are currently testing nearly 1,000 animals per day as part of our BSE enhanced surveillance program, more than 388,000 total tests, and this is the first confirmed case resulting from our surveillance," Johanns said. "I am encouraged that our interlocking safeguards are working exactly as intended. This animal was blocked from entering the food supply because of the firewalls we have in place. Americans have every reason to continue to be confident in the safety of our beef."

Effective immediately, if another BSE rapid screening test results in inconclusive findings, USDA will run both an IHC and Western blot confirmatory test. If results from either confirmatory test are positive, the sample will be considered positive for BSE.

"I want to make sure we continue to give consumers every reason to be confident in the health of our cattle herd," Johanns said. "By adding the second confirmatory test, we boost that confidence and bring our testing in line with the evolving worldwide trend to use both IHC and Western blot together as confirmatory tests for BSE."

USDA has initiated an epidemiological investigation to determine the animal's herd of origin. That investigation is not yet complete. The animal was born before the United States instituted a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in August 1997, which prevents the use of most mammalian protein in cattle feed. According to internationally accepted research, feed containing meat-and-bone meal is the primary way BSE is transferred to the cattle population.

The animal was selected for testing because, as a non-ambulatory animal, it was considered to be at higher risk for BSE. An initial screening test on the animal in November 2004 was inconclusive, triggering USDA to conduct the internationally accepted confirmatory IHC tests. Those test results were negative. Earlier this month, USDA's Office of the Inspector General recommended further testing of the seven-month-old sample using another internationally recognized confirmatory test, the Western blot. Unlike the IHC, the Western blot was reactive, prompting USDA to send samples from the animal to the Weybridge laboratory for further analysis.

The laboratory in Weybridge, England, is recognized by the World Animal Health Organization, or OIE, as a world reference laboratory for BSE. Weybridge officials this week conducted a combination of rapid, IHC and Western blot testing on tissue samples from the animal in question. At the same time these diagnostic tests were being run by Weybridge, USDA conducted its own additional tests.

As a non-ambulatory, or "downer" animal, the cow was prohibited from entering the human food supply, under an interim final rule in effect since January 2004. Research has shown that BSE is most likely to be found in older non-ambulatory cattle, animals showing signs of central nervous system disorders, injured or emaciated animals, and cattle that have died for unexplained reasons. USDA's testing program targets these groups of animals for testing.

The system of human health protections includes the USDA ban on specified risk materials, or SRM's, from the food supply. SRM's are most likely to contain the BSE agent if it is present in an animal. Additional measures, such as a longstanding ban on importing cattle and beef products from high-risk countries, a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban, U.S. slaughter practices, and aggressive surveillance provide a series of interlocking safeguards to protect U.S. consumers and animal health.

USDA remains committed to protecting both U.S. consumers and U.S. livestock from BSE, and to that end continues efforts to detect the disease through its enhanced BSE surveillance program. Once sufficient data from the surveillance program has been accumulated, USDA will consult with outside experts to analyze it and determine whether any changes to existing risk management measures are necessary.

This confirmed case of BSE in no way impacts the safety of our nation's food supply. As the epidemiological investigation progresses, USDA will continue to communicate findings in a timely and transparent manner.

Wait a minute not found in ground beef? Then why has the border only been open to muscle cuts from Canada for the past 18 months?
 

Silver

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Well that's easy Bill. It's because it's an economic issue. No, wait a minute, it's a food safety issue. No, it's about money.... dang, I'm confused.... :???:
 

STAFF

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Johanns also directed USDA scientists to work with international experts to thoughtfully develop a new protocol that includes performing dual confirmatory tests in the event of another "inconclusive" BSE screening test.
Western BLOT is what is needed.
 
A

Anonymous

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STAFF said:
Johanns also directed USDA scientists to work with international experts to thoughtfully develop a new protocol that includes performing dual confirmatory tests in the event of another "inconclusive" BSE screening test.
Western BLOT is what is needed.

And a thoro testing of all cattle with Western Blot on both sides of the border before we go looking at reducing any import or safety standards.....Better to put the restrictions in and stop it now than have it come back to haunt us 10 years from now.......
 

agman

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Bill said:
NCBA Statement on USDA Announcement of BSE Case
Terry Stokes, Chief Executive Officer
National Cattlemen's Beef Association

"A short time ago, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it has confirmed a case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad cow disease) in a cow born before the FDA feed ban.

"The animal did not enter the human food or animal feed supply.

"The bottom line for consumers remains the same: Your beef is safe. Scientists, medical professionals and government officials agree that BSE is not a public health risk in the United States. BSE infectivity has not been found in beef, including steaks, roasts and ground beef.

"Since June 2004, the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program has tested more than 388,000 targeted animals at highest risk for BSE and has found only this case, which confirms estimates that the prevalence of this disease in the U.S. cattle population must be extremely low.

"But as far back as the late 1980s, the U.S. government and cattle industry have taken precautions to protect public and animal health from BSE.

"To keep our beef supply safe, USDA mandates removal from the food supply materials that would most likely carry the BSE agent (such as brain and spinal cord). This process happens every day with every animal to ensure this diminishing disease has no affect on public health.

"To protect our cattle, one of the most important measures undertaken is the FDA feed ban, which was championed by cattlemen and became law in 1997. The feed ban prohibits feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. BSE is not contagious; the disease is only known to spread through feed so the feed ban breaks the cycle and helps assure the disease will be eliminated. As USDA Secretary Johanns said in the announcement today, 'BSE is becoming very rare,' like 'searching for a needle in the haystack,' because of the effectiveness of the feed ban.

"We support Secretary Johann's recommendations and thorough review of the testing protocol. It is important to remember this sample went through a rigorous testing protocol prior to this determination, and that all other samples tested in the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program - more than 388,000 - have tested negative.

"Because U.S. beef is safe from BSE, this announcement should not affect ongoing discussion to reopen the border for beef trade and we urge USDA to do everything within its power to send that message to our trading partners.

"As America's beef producers, our number-one priority has always been providing the safest beef in the world. Our livelihood depends on it and NCBA has worked with the government and top scientists for more than 15 years to build, maintain and expand the safeguards that today are protecting consumers and our cattle from BSE."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Additional Information:
The government has built and maintained four effective firewalls to ensure that U.S. beef remains safe from BSE:

In 2003, USDA strengthened its food safety program by banning from the human food supply any cattle that are unable to walk. Cattle showing signs of possible neurological disease always have been banned from the food supply. The USDA also prohibited from the food supply anything that could potentially carry BSE.

In 1996, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association launched a voluntary feed ban, which established an industry standard against feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. In 1997, with our support, the FDA made the ban mandatory.

In 1990, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to begin a BSE Surveillance and Testing program.

In 1989, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to ban imports of beef, cattle products and cattle from countries where BSE is prevalent.
To learn more about BSE, information can found at the following Web sites:

Centers for Disease Control Q&A: www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/bse_cjd_qa.htm

Food and Drug Administration Q&A: www.fda.gov/cber/bse/bseqa.htm#a1

U.S. Department of Agriculture Q&A: www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse_q&a.html

Beef Industry Scientific Panel Information Resource: www.BSEinfo.org

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
USDA ANNOUNCES BSE TEST RESULTS AND NEW BSE CONFIRMATORY TESTING PROTOCOL
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has received final test results from The Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Weybridge, England, confirming that a sample from an animal that was blocked from the food supply in November 2004 has tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Johanns also directed USDA scientists to work with international experts to thoughtfully develop a new protocol that includes performing dual confirmatory tests in the event of another "inconclusive" BSE screening test.

"We are currently testing nearly 1,000 animals per day as part of our BSE enhanced surveillance program, more than 388,000 total tests, and this is the first confirmed case resulting from our surveillance," Johanns said. "I am encouraged that our interlocking safeguards are working exactly as intended. This animal was blocked from entering the food supply because of the firewalls we have in place. Americans have every reason to continue to be confident in the safety of our beef."

Effective immediately, if another BSE rapid screening test results in inconclusive findings, USDA will run both an IHC and Western blot confirmatory test. If results from either confirmatory test are positive, the sample will be considered positive for BSE.

"I want to make sure we continue to give consumers every reason to be confident in the health of our cattle herd," Johanns said. "By adding the second confirmatory test, we boost that confidence and bring our testing in line with the evolving worldwide trend to use both IHC and Western blot together as confirmatory tests for BSE."

USDA has initiated an epidemiological investigation to determine the animal's herd of origin. That investigation is not yet complete. The animal was born before the United States instituted a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in August 1997, which prevents the use of most mammalian protein in cattle feed. According to internationally accepted research, feed containing meat-and-bone meal is the primary way BSE is transferred to the cattle population.

The animal was selected for testing because, as a non-ambulatory animal, it was considered to be at higher risk for BSE. An initial screening test on the animal in November 2004 was inconclusive, triggering USDA to conduct the internationally accepted confirmatory IHC tests. Those test results were negative. Earlier this month, USDA's Office of the Inspector General recommended further testing of the seven-month-old sample using another internationally recognized confirmatory test, the Western blot. Unlike the IHC, the Western blot was reactive, prompting USDA to send samples from the animal to the Weybridge laboratory for further analysis.

The laboratory in Weybridge, England, is recognized by the World Animal Health Organization, or OIE, as a world reference laboratory for BSE. Weybridge officials this week conducted a combination of rapid, IHC and Western blot testing on tissue samples from the animal in question. At the same time these diagnostic tests were being run by Weybridge, USDA conducted its own additional tests.

As a non-ambulatory, or "downer" animal, the cow was prohibited from entering the human food supply, under an interim final rule in effect since January 2004. Research has shown that BSE is most likely to be found in older non-ambulatory cattle, animals showing signs of central nervous system disorders, injured or emaciated animals, and cattle that have died for unexplained reasons. USDA's testing program targets these groups of animals for testing.

The system of human health protections includes the USDA ban on specified risk materials, or SRM's, from the food supply. SRM's are most likely to contain the BSE agent if it is present in an animal. Additional measures, such as a longstanding ban on importing cattle and beef products from high-risk countries, a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban, U.S. slaughter practices, and aggressive surveillance provide a series of interlocking safeguards to protect U.S. consumers and animal health.

USDA remains committed to protecting both U.S. consumers and U.S. livestock from BSE, and to that end continues efforts to detect the disease through its enhanced BSE surveillance program. Once sufficient data from the surveillance program has been accumulated, USDA will consult with outside experts to analyze it and determine whether any changes to existing risk management measures are necessary.

This confirmed case of BSE in no way impacts the safety of our nation's food supply. As the epidemiological investigation progresses, USDA will continue to communicate findings in a timely and transparent manner.

Wait a minute not found in ground beef? Then why has the border only been open to muscle cuts from Canada for the past 18 months?

The mere fact that BSE is more prevalent in OTM cattle does not mean ground beef is tainted. If the SRM's are removed the likelihood of tainted ground beef is extremely unlikely given current known science.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
agman said:
Bill said:
NCBA Statement on USDA Announcement of BSE Case
Terry Stokes, Chief Executive Officer
National Cattlemen's Beef Association

"A short time ago, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it has confirmed a case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad cow disease) in a cow born before the FDA feed ban.

"The animal did not enter the human food or animal feed supply.

"The bottom line for consumers remains the same: Your beef is safe. Scientists, medical professionals and government officials agree that BSE is not a public health risk in the United States. BSE infectivity has not been found in beef, including steaks, roasts and ground beef.

"Since June 2004, the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program has tested more than 388,000 targeted animals at highest risk for BSE and has found only this case, which confirms estimates that the prevalence of this disease in the U.S. cattle population must be extremely low.

"But as far back as the late 1980s, the U.S. government and cattle industry have taken precautions to protect public and animal health from BSE.

"To keep our beef supply safe, USDA mandates removal from the food supply materials that would most likely carry the BSE agent (such as brain and spinal cord). This process happens every day with every animal to ensure this diminishing disease has no affect on public health.

"To protect our cattle, one of the most important measures undertaken is the FDA feed ban, which was championed by cattlemen and became law in 1997. The feed ban prohibits feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. BSE is not contagious; the disease is only known to spread through feed so the feed ban breaks the cycle and helps assure the disease will be eliminated. As USDA Secretary Johanns said in the announcement today, 'BSE is becoming very rare,' like 'searching for a needle in the haystack,' because of the effectiveness of the feed ban.

"We support Secretary Johann's recommendations and thorough review of the testing protocol. It is important to remember this sample went through a rigorous testing protocol prior to this determination, and that all other samples tested in the U.S. BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program - more than 388,000 - have tested negative.

"Because U.S. beef is safe from BSE, this announcement should not affect ongoing discussion to reopen the border for beef trade and we urge USDA to do everything within its power to send that message to our trading partners.

"As America's beef producers, our number-one priority has always been providing the safest beef in the world. Our livelihood depends on it and NCBA has worked with the government and top scientists for more than 15 years to build, maintain and expand the safeguards that today are protecting consumers and our cattle from BSE."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Additional Information:
The government has built and maintained four effective firewalls to ensure that U.S. beef remains safe from BSE:

In 2003, USDA strengthened its food safety program by banning from the human food supply any cattle that are unable to walk. Cattle showing signs of possible neurological disease always have been banned from the food supply. The USDA also prohibited from the food supply anything that could potentially carry BSE.

In 1996, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association launched a voluntary feed ban, which established an industry standard against feeding ruminant-derived protein to cattle. In 1997, with our support, the FDA made the ban mandatory.

In 1990, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to begin a BSE Surveillance and Testing program.

In 1989, the United States was the first country in the world without BSE to ban imports of beef, cattle products and cattle from countries where BSE is prevalent.
To learn more about BSE, information can found at the following Web sites:

Centers for Disease Control Q&A: www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/bse_cjd_qa.htm

Food and Drug Administration Q&A: www.fda.gov/cber/bse/bseqa.htm#a1

U.S. Department of Agriculture Q&A: www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse_q&a.html

Beef Industry Scientific Panel Information Resource: www.BSEinfo.org

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
USDA ANNOUNCES BSE TEST RESULTS AND NEW BSE CONFIRMATORY TESTING PROTOCOL
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has received final test results from The Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Weybridge, England, confirming that a sample from an animal that was blocked from the food supply in November 2004 has tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Johanns also directed USDA scientists to work with international experts to thoughtfully develop a new protocol that includes performing dual confirmatory tests in the event of another "inconclusive" BSE screening test.

"We are currently testing nearly 1,000 animals per day as part of our BSE enhanced surveillance program, more than 388,000 total tests, and this is the first confirmed case resulting from our surveillance," Johanns said. "I am encouraged that our interlocking safeguards are working exactly as intended. This animal was blocked from entering the food supply because of the firewalls we have in place. Americans have every reason to continue to be confident in the safety of our beef."

Effective immediately, if another BSE rapid screening test results in inconclusive findings, USDA will run both an IHC and Western blot confirmatory test. If results from either confirmatory test are positive, the sample will be considered positive for BSE.

"I want to make sure we continue to give consumers every reason to be confident in the health of our cattle herd," Johanns said. "By adding the second confirmatory test, we boost that confidence and bring our testing in line with the evolving worldwide trend to use both IHC and Western blot together as confirmatory tests for BSE."

USDA has initiated an epidemiological investigation to determine the animal's herd of origin. That investigation is not yet complete. The animal was born before the United States instituted a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in August 1997, which prevents the use of most mammalian protein in cattle feed. According to internationally accepted research, feed containing meat-and-bone meal is the primary way BSE is transferred to the cattle population.

The animal was selected for testing because, as a non-ambulatory animal, it was considered to be at higher risk for BSE. An initial screening test on the animal in November 2004 was inconclusive, triggering USDA to conduct the internationally accepted confirmatory IHC tests. Those test results were negative. Earlier this month, USDA's Office of the Inspector General recommended further testing of the seven-month-old sample using another internationally recognized confirmatory test, the Western blot. Unlike the IHC, the Western blot was reactive, prompting USDA to send samples from the animal to the Weybridge laboratory for further analysis.

The laboratory in Weybridge, England, is recognized by the World Animal Health Organization, or OIE, as a world reference laboratory for BSE. Weybridge officials this week conducted a combination of rapid, IHC and Western blot testing on tissue samples from the animal in question. At the same time these diagnostic tests were being run by Weybridge, USDA conducted its own additional tests.

As a non-ambulatory, or "downer" animal, the cow was prohibited from entering the human food supply, under an interim final rule in effect since January 2004. Research has shown that BSE is most likely to be found in older non-ambulatory cattle, animals showing signs of central nervous system disorders, injured or emaciated animals, and cattle that have died for unexplained reasons. USDA's testing program targets these groups of animals for testing.

The system of human health protections includes the USDA ban on specified risk materials, or SRM's, from the food supply. SRM's are most likely to contain the BSE agent if it is present in an animal. Additional measures, such as a longstanding ban on importing cattle and beef products from high-risk countries, a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban, U.S. slaughter practices, and aggressive surveillance provide a series of interlocking safeguards to protect U.S. consumers and animal health.

USDA remains committed to protecting both U.S. consumers and U.S. livestock from BSE, and to that end continues efforts to detect the disease through its enhanced BSE surveillance program. Once sufficient data from the surveillance program has been accumulated, USDA will consult with outside experts to analyze it and determine whether any changes to existing risk management measures are necessary.

This confirmed case of BSE in no way impacts the safety of our nation's food supply. As the epidemiological investigation progresses, USDA will continue to communicate findings in a timely and transparent manner.

Wait a minute not found in ground beef? Then why has the border only been open to muscle cuts from Canada for the past 18 months?

The mere fact that BSE is more prevalent in OTM cattle does not mean ground beef is tainted. If the SRM's are removed the likelihood of tainted ground beef is extremely unlikely given current known science.

Is "extremely unlikely" the same as "possible", "could be", " low risk", "of unknown quantity". "believed to be", "maybe", thought to be", and about 100 more "scientific" terms I've heard to describe the "SOUND SCIENCE" or later "BEST SCIENCE AVAILABLE" (when the sound science didn't prove out), or as you know word it "CURRENT KNOWN SCIENCE" :???: :???: that the Packing Industry and their pawns, USDA and NCBA have put out... US consumers and the US cattle industry need to know exactly what is happening- not what a disfunctional USDA and NCBA mimick that the big money boys tell them to say......Packers are looking at the bucks they make today- Hell with the future or the generation that might take over the ranch-- If they are wrong and 100's are dying 10 years from now and they get sued or the cattle industry fails, they just kill more chickens or declare bankruptcy, leave the shareholder holding the bag, and the same names start over with a new corporation.....

We need to go back and look at this whole BSE situation without the corporate influenced USDA screwing things up-- Congress needs to have OIG do a complete and thoro investigation and make binding recommendations before we do anything more.......
 

Bill

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Wait a minute not found in ground beef? Then why has the border only been open to muscle cuts from Canada for the past 18 months?
The mere fact that BSE is more prevalent in OTM cattle does not mean ground beef is tainted. If the SRM's are removed the likelihood of tainted ground beef is extremely unlikely given current known science.
Exactly!
 

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