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New to Ranching, moving from Maryland to Dallas Tx

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lipagana

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Ok call me crazy, which everyone has...I grew up on a cattle ranch outside of Dallas area. Out of 2 dozen Heirs of a rancher I am the only one who continued to work in the farm industry. However I moved to Maryland and went into the horse training business.

After many years of not being able to take this liberal state and the horrible "Uppity" industry I am in, we are heading back to Texas.

I am terrified. Every one thinks we are crazy. Our family ranch has long been abandoned other then a couple of horses checked on once a week by a neighbor. There are no more cattle. House needs work but fences and water holes are still good. We have a couple tractors still in good shape and other expensive equipment still available so a lot of stuff is still in place. The property is very over grown with trees, brush, feral hog and deer.

I am a hard worker! Just to be clear I am a woman lol That seems to make a difference to many. I work 10-16 hour days, in the heat, blizzards, rain you name it weather wise. I drive a tractor, use tools, ride, vaccinate, can handle guns, crops etc. I know I have a solid foundation. My husband is learning but is a cop working full time and will continue to do so. So I am terrified or crazy.

Where do we start?

What breed? What kind suggested for beef? How small/large do I start? Any internships? Training programs? Any thing? Just where do I start?

As we get closer I'm getting scared but there is no job other then my husband being police or military that I think is more honorable then working your land and I am set on continuing my grandfathers legacy.

Typical woman I have rambled on....
 

Faster horses

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Good for you. You go for it, girl! If you have the right attitude (wanting to learn instead of acting like you
know it all), I bet your neighbors will help you. There are county extension offices you can get information from. There are Texans on this site that will help you if they read this. I'm sure it will be way different
than you are used to, but different doesn't mean 'bad'. The Texans I know seem to be wonderful people. I think you probably need a brahma cross cattle in order to stand the heat there. But I don't live in Texas....Santa Gertudis is another breed that can stand heat as well. I think it is commendable that you want to continue your grandfathers legacy. I have a friend who trains horses near Aubrey Texas and I'm sure he would answer some questions for you. Which way from Dallas are you re-locating to?

FWIW, people seem to be moving to Texas because of some of the same reasons you mentioned.
I would get my feet wet with cattle before I went swimming. Now is an expensive time to buy cattle as they are at an all-time high. So I would start small. There are also goats....that industry is on the rise.

Can you afford to hire someone that you could learn from? That would be helpful if you could find someone....maybe someone older with a good track record.

Good luck to you. Let us know how it goes! I'm sure if you don't do this, when it seems to mean so much to you, you will always regret not having tried. Remember, life is an adventure!
 

graybull

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Would recommend to everyone to get a copy of Johann's Zietsman's Profitable Ranching book........MAN, CATTLE and VELD......it will answer many of the questions you are asking......IF not all of them.

http://mancattleveld.com
 

bverellen

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Invest in yourself first.

Sign up and attend a Ranching for Profit school before you buy any livestock and have any excuse to say you don't have the time. At first blush it seems expensive, however, you'll change your mind the first day you are there.

http://www.ranchmanagement.com/

It is a one week intensive school that will not teach you how to ranch, but rather it will teach you to think and analyze your decisions and help you achieve your goals. Attendees come from different backgrounds and experience levels of ranching, including women and those with no experience but a desire to ranch profitably. Do not feel intimidated.

The principals you will learn, coupled with the contacts and friendships you develope will serve you well for a lifetime.

For a taste of what the school is about purchase Dave Pratt's book "Health Land, Happy Families and Profitable Businesses"

http://www.ranchmanagement.com/book/book.html

HTH
 

Richardd

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As for the breed that works, just about any of the common breeds will do good. I would check around the area and see what other people have. Might even go to the local sale barn and see what it going thru and what sells good in the area. All depends on what the order buyers are looking for. Of course with the market these days, most everything is selling good. Beefmasters is one that you might want to stay away from, you will most likely get a big discount when selling because of the extra hide and fat. At least that is the way it works in my area.
I live in Cuero, South of Austin. We run mostly Black Brangus with a Hereford/Brangus cross bull. Get good growthy calves, end up with mostly motley faced calves, some red and some black, some solid red and some solid black. Guess that depends on the moon when the cows are bred. LOL.
If you are going to be running your cattle in brush, stay away from a bull with a long Sheath.
Wishing you good luck on you Venture. What does good in one area doesn't always do good in another. Best thing to do is talk to cattle people in your area and see what they say. A good one is the owner of the sale barn, they know what sells and does well in the area.
 

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