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mustang

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Disclaimer,,,I do not represent the Utah Travel Council.

I though I might post something other than mustang picture, mainly because after two trips to the desert, I came up with no pictures.

The first group is of an abandon ranch now under the clear blue waters of Lake Powell. I was a lot younger when I took these pictures, but suffered a long hot hike to get there.






The Hyte Marina at the upper end of the lake.




Some more of the Red Rock Country of South Eastern Utah


Red Canyon, just out of Bryce Canyon.


One of three,,The Goose Necks of the San Juan River.


Bryce Canyon with frosting.


Across the state in Calaao, Utah there are maybe a half dozen ranches in the area. In the old days, it was a Pony Express Station, with a lot of history and an outlaw hideout. A hundred miles from nowhere.





The thrasher probably brought back some memories, how many have seen or used this machine ?


At Pioche Nevada, which once was said to be the most wicked town in the west, we found this sign in the window of an antique shop.


We found these charcoal kilns at Frisco Utah, now, not much more than ghost town with a cemetery. History books say that when the new sheriff came to town he killed six bad guys the first night. When it too quiet in Frisco, the Sheriff moved on to Pioche. Before noon the next day, the population had decreased by a sizeable number.
 

Clarencen

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Interesting pictures The old thresher looks quite small, but it does have galvanized metal sides. The other looks like a horsepower hay press, saw one of them demonstrated at a threshing bee one time. The one I saw had a large spring that compressed as the horses went around. Horse really had to pull when the spring was nearly tight, then when it passed center it was released sending a plunger to press the hay.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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I agree with Clarence those are interesting pictures. Bryce canyon looks like crystals,.

I fed bundles to a threshing machine like that at a threshing bee. :D

I think I probably rode on a combine like that one when i was a kid.

My guess was a stationary balers but didn't realize it was horse powered until Clarence mentioned it and then I noticed the double tree.
 

Saddleup

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I recall a stationary hay press, or baler, that's still in use for demos at the Fort Steele museum at Cranbrook B.C. It is two horse driven, and actually makes pretty good bales though slow. Its sure is neat to see it in operation, although ANY horse drawn/driven piece off machinery in my opinion is neat to see. We are fast losing our connections to the past, and fewer and fewer people are willing to spend time to learn how to drive with horses/mules to run this old farming machinery.
 

Hayguy

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Saddleup said:
I recall a stationary hay press, or baler, that's still in use for demos at the Fort Steele museum at Cranbrook B.C. It is two horse driven, and actually makes pretty good bales though slow. Its sure is neat to see it in operation, although ANY horse drawn/driven piece off machinery in my opinion is neat to see. We are fast losing our connections to the past, and fewer and fewer people are willing to spend time to learn how to drive with horses/mules to run this old farming machinery.



:agree: and 1.38/litre diesel has got me thinking again of how the old boy's did it all pre infernal combustion
 

gcreekrch

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Beautiful country captured by a natural artist Mustang. Debbie and I both thank you.

Grain farming must have been good there for a short time for the sodbusters to afford a combine.
 

mustang

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gcreekrch said:
Beautiful country captured by a natural artist Mustang. Debbie and I both thank you.

Grain farming must have been good there for a short time for the sodbusters to afford a combine.

Thanks for the kind words. They don't hurt my ego at all. :D
 

Ho55

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Very neat photos mustang. The first pictures are of the ol halls creek ranch. Something near and dear to me. As my family had ownership of it before lake Powell covered it. I still run cows around there in the winter. My most favorite part of this world. Thank you. I would be very interested in purchasing copies of any pictures you have of the ranch. Thank you again. You made my evening.
 

tamarack

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Great pics! I recently rescued my grandfathers threshing machine from the bush when I got it out looked it over closer and found grandpas writing on the galvanised metal in pencil ( must have had good lead in those days) of who he was threshing for and the bushels but no dates.It looked like the one in your pic with just a shadow of the makers name.
 

Soapweed

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Great pictures, mustang. It was interesting that the San Francisco stage runs on the second and "forth" Friday of each month. Did they celebrate the "Forth" of July in those days? :wink:

mustang, you have a real talent for taking wonderful photographs. They are always very inspiring to all of us when you post. Thank you very much.
 

mustang

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Soapweed said:
Great pictures, mustang. It was interesting that the San Francisco stage runs on the second and "forth" Friday of each month. Did they celebrate the "Forth" of July in those days? :wink:

mustang, you have a real talent for taking wonderful photographs. They are always very inspiring to all of us when you post. Thank you very much.


I would guess that in those days, small towns were hungry for excuses to celebrate. Being Pioche was known as a wild place, I'm guessing they did their part to "kick up their heals."

Thanks to everyone for your comments.
Mustang

Pioche is known for its "Million Dollar Courthouse", built in 1872. The original cost of $88,000 far exceeded initial estimates and was financed, and refinanced with bonds totaling nearly $1 million. Pioche currently contains the county administrative offices and has one of the oldest grade schools in the state.
Next door to the courthouse sits the old Mountain View Hotel, where President Herbert Hoover is said to have stayed in 1930. Built in 1895, the hotel served the lodging needs of dignitaries visiting Pioche on court business. Although the building no longer serves as a hotel, it still is a superb example of turn-of-the-century western architecture. There is another hotel, the Overland, which is still operating, with 14 themed rooms on the second floor over the main saloon. Local folklore suggests that it is haunted by one or more ghosts.
An aerial tramway carried buckets of ore from the mines to the Godbe Mill. The tramway ran during the 1920s and 1930s and was used for the transportation of silver and nickel ore. Although the tramway is abandoned, its cables still stretch over parts of the town, and its ore buckets still hang to this day
 

MO_cows

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Great images! It is amazing how long stuff lasts in the dry West. Old stuff here rots away a lot faster and gets covered up with weeds, brush, trees.
 

mustang

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MO_cows said:
Great images! It is amazing how long stuff lasts in the dry West. Old stuff here rots away a lot faster and gets covered up with weeds, brush, trees.

The pictures of the thrasher and the combine are taken at Caliao Ut,, which is in the west edge of the Salt Lake desert. Other that a little salt grass, not much grows there without irrigation. Sage brush grows at elevations above the lake bed which has a lot of salt and alkali in the soil I attribute the dry climate to the preservation of our antiques. However it hasn't helped me a whole lot. :? :?
 

DB Cooper

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Mustang:
You live in a stunningly beautiful area. I am curious as to what someone would have been burning in the charcoal ovens as I don't see any trees; unless they burned them all.
 

mustang

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DB Cooper said:
Mustang:
You live in a stunningly beautiful area. I am curious as to what someone would have been burning in the charcoal ovens as I don't see any trees; unless they burned them all.

There are a lot o juniper trees in Utah in the lower and drier elevations It's pure speculation on my part but I guess, that is where a lot of their fire wood came from. In the higher mountain ranges we have evergreen trees. Mine timbers are cut and used from the larger and straighter type trees, even today.
 

mrj

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The sun on those craggy red rock ridges is so beautiful!

I love to see that sort of country, but being totally 'chicken' about driving up mountains, it is hard for me to enjoy it in person. Far better to see some elses' pictures!

Those old time farmers sure must have earned everything they got from that harsh appearing land. Great that some had the strength for it.

Thanks very much for sharing the photo tour with us. I love the horse photo's, but scenery is wonderful in its own way.

mrj
 

mustang

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mrj said:
The sun on those craggy red rock ridges is so beautiful!

I love to see that sort of country, but being totally 'chicken' about driving up mountains, it is hard for me to enjoy it in person. Far better to see some elses' pictures!

Those old time farmers sure must have earned everything they got from that harsh appearing land. Great that some had the strength for it.

Thanks very much for sharing the photo tour with us. I love the horse photo's, but scenery is wonderful in its own way.

mrj

Your comment about, strong people, reminded me of a comment a friend of mine made about some pioneers that crossed the Colorado River in the mid 1800s. He said that if getting to Bluff had been any easier, those early settlers would have turned around and went back.
I'll include some pictures of some of the trail they made along the way. The other pictures are in the same general area, but not the actual trail.


Those settlers brough about 50 wagons down the cut in the background and through this crevasse. Aprox. 250 people, men, women and kids made the trip, with two babies being born along the way.


Lake Powell has covered about 250 feet of the original trail. I hiked it once long ago, It wasn't fun.


Another obstacle along the way was "The Chute." Not a lot of fun even on a bike.





Rainbow Bridge isn't on the "Hole-in-the Rock Trail" but it is in the general area.


These two are just some took while exploring the country.







mrj made me do it.....
 

burnt

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mrj, make him do it some more...

Simply stunning. Thank you for posting them. They show quite a bit more than what we saw on our couple of quick trips through Utah.
 

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