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OIL IN ND!

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Hiker1

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If it was just the rig, it wouldn't be bad. It is everything else that comes with it.

Too bad the media doesn't talk more to the locals and get their opinion on this oil boom. Farming and ranching has become a nightmare with the traffic and dust.

It is heart breaking to see what is happening to the land.
 

nmhighdesert

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I lived up there in the 80's and 90's and everyone I talk to is sucking up those checks like a bunch of Chicago voters. They did it in the 80's and will do it again. But the real trouble is for the local people that don't own the land or minerals. Booms drive the whole economy in the toilet, prices go up for the natives so bad they can't survive it. But the very same thing is going on in south Texas now also.
 

hypocritexposer

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Better to keep things more consistent, that's for sure. Talk to anybody that had to deal with the last "boom" in Alberta, but in saying that the O/G industry over the last decade has been the best at raising wages/salaries out of them all.

edited to add: One of the problems with the jobs for teachers etc. is the bureaucracy involved. There is no quick way to adjust their salaries to the changing local economy. There has to be better flexibility to make these adjustments.

There is no reason a teacher's salary cannot be temporarily adjusted, so they can "pay the rent". The added tax revenue coming into the local area should be able to afford a "buffer" to rise and fall with the changing economy.

Maybe if it was a "true free market" it could.

When a "boom" presents itself, more structured pay schemes, like unionized workers, or government agencies have not provided themselves with the flexibility to adapt, as quickly. A rigid structure is not always a good thing and can mean employee turnover etc.


But I will say, I give the people that are willing to live in their cars, trailer park or a tent, a lot of credit. The are attempting to better themselves.

Unfortunately "tent cities" don't go over as well in a "boom town" as they do in downtown NY, if you are a protester


There's also the opportunity for a "boom" in Montana, to a lesser degree, but the "regulations" seem to be more stringent. If they were to "open it up", there would be less stress on the surrounding communties on both sides of the border.


We saw the same type of scenario in Alberta/Sask. Many "cross border" communities could have shared the stress, while reaping the benefits, but chose not to.
 

Denny

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As cheap as houses have been in small town N.d. they should each own a couple of houses.Now it's too late pay up. I've got alot of broke friends spending alot of money here around home.They are getting ahead by working out there as long as their marriges with stand the job demands. Problem is getting good hands on type help as they keep heading west.
 

Justin

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it will be interesting to see how many of those working there will make once winter sets in. it may get tough for those sleeping in their cars and pop-up campers.
 

Faster horses

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hypocritexposer said:
Better to keep things more consistent, that's for sure. Talk to anybody that had to deal with the last "boom" in Alberta, but in saying that the O/G industry over the last decade has been the best at raising wages/salaries out of them all.

edited to add: One of the problems with the jobs for teachers etc. is the bureaucracy involved. There is no quick way to adjust their salaries to the changing local economy. There has to be better flexibility to make these adjustments.

There is no reason a teacher's salary cannot be temporarily adjusted, so they can "pay the rent". The added tax revenue coming into the local area should be able to afford a "buffer" to rise and fall with the changing economy.

Maybe if it was a "true free market" it could.

When a "boom" presents itself, more structured pay schemes, like unionized workers, or government agencies have not provided themselves with the flexibility to adapt, as quickly. A rigid structure is not always a good thing and can mean employee turnover etc.


But I will say, I give the people that are willing to live in their cars, trailer park or a tent, a lot of credit. The are attempting to better themselves.

Unfortunately "tent cities" don't go over as well in a "boom town" as they do in downtown NY, if you are a protester


There's also the opportunity for a "boom" in Montana, to a lesser degree, but the "regulations" seem to be more stringent. If they were to "open it up", there would be less stress on the surrounding communties on both sides of the border.


We saw the same type of scenario in Alberta/Sask. Many "cross border" communities could have shared the stress, while reaping the benefits, but chose not to.

Our town 'fathers', expecting to see some boom here, are already
travelling to towns like Williston to see the problems and try to
address them early on. I heard yesterday that a fella close to town
sold 2-10 acre pieces for $3000/acre. Don't know if that had to do
with the coming 'boom' or not. Housing isn't good here either, but
a new apartment complex is being built.

I'm with Justin, it will be interesting what happens this winter to
those trying to sleep in their cars. I feel bad for them, trying to
get ahead under what could be brutal conditions this winter. And
winter could last a long time. We are forcast to get our first snow
on Saturday, Nov. 5.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Faster horses said:
hypocritexposer said:
Better to keep things more consistent, that's for sure. Talk to anybody that had to deal with the last "boom" in Alberta, but in saying that the O/G industry over the last decade has been the best at raising wages/salaries out of them all.

edited to add: One of the problems with the jobs for teachers etc. is the bureaucracy involved. There is no quick way to adjust their salaries to the changing local economy. There has to be better flexibility to make these adjustments.

There is no reason a teacher's salary cannot be temporarily adjusted, so they can "pay the rent". The added tax revenue coming into the local area should be able to afford a "buffer" to rise and fall with the changing economy.

Maybe if it was a "true free market" it could.

When a "boom" presents itself, more structured pay schemes, like unionized workers, or government agencies have not provided themselves with the flexibility to adapt, as quickly. A rigid structure is not always a good thing and can mean employee turnover etc.


But I will say, I give the people that are willing to live in their cars, trailer park or a tent, a lot of credit. The are attempting to better themselves.

Unfortunately "tent cities" don't go over as well in a "boom town" as they do in downtown NY, if you are a protester


There's also the opportunity for a "boom" in Montana, to a lesser degree, but the "regulations" seem to be more stringent. If they were to "open it up", there would be less stress on the surrounding communties on both sides of the border.


We saw the same type of scenario in Alberta/Sask. Many "cross border" communities could have shared the stress, while reaping the benefits, but chose not to.

Our town 'fathers', expecting to see some boom here, are already
travelling to towns like Williston to see the problems and try to
address them early on. I heard yesterday that a fella close to town
sold 2-10 acre pieces for $3000/acre. Don't know if that had to do
with the coming 'boom' or not. Housing isn't good here either, but
a new apartment complex is being built.

I'm with Justin, it will be interesting what happens this winter to
those trying to sleep in their cars. I feel bad for them, trying to
get ahead under what could be brutal conditions this winter. And
winter could last a long time. We are forcast to get our first snow
on Saturday, Nov. 5.

Must be helping the tax base- as I heard the Baker school system was putting in a new multi million $ sports complex complete with all weather track- and an artificial turf football field (which will be the first Class B school in the state to have one)...

The first snowstorm is scheduled to hit ND on Friday/Sat with several inches of snow predicted...
 

Faster horses

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Oldtimer said:
Faster horses said:
hypocritexposer said:
Better to keep things more consistent, that's for sure. Talk to anybody that had to deal with the last "boom" in Alberta, but in saying that the O/G industry over the last decade has been the best at raising wages/salaries out of them all.

edited to add: One of the problems with the jobs for teachers etc. is the bureaucracy involved. There is no quick way to adjust their salaries to the changing local economy. There has to be better flexibility to make these adjustments.

There is no reason a teacher's salary cannot be temporarily adjusted, so they can "pay the rent". The added tax revenue coming into the local area should be able to afford a "buffer" to rise and fall with the changing economy.

Maybe if it was a "true free market" it could.

When a "boom" presents itself, more structured pay schemes, like unionized workers, or government agencies have not provided themselves with the flexibility to adapt, as quickly. A rigid structure is not always a good thing and can mean employee turnover etc.


But I will say, I give the people that are willing to live in their cars, trailer park or a tent, a lot of credit. The are attempting to better themselves.

Unfortunately "tent cities" don't go over as well in a "boom town" as they do in downtown NY, if you are a protester


There's also the opportunity for a "boom" in Montana, to a lesser degree, but the "regulations" seem to be more stringent. If they were to "open it up", there would be less stress on the surrounding communties on both sides of the border.


We saw the same type of scenario in Alberta/Sask. Many "cross border" communities could have shared the stress, while reaping the benefits, but chose not to.

Our town 'fathers', expecting to see some boom here, are already
travelling to towns like Williston to see the problems and try to
address them early on. I heard yesterday that a fella close to town
sold 2-10 acre pieces for $3000/acre. Don't know if that had to do
with the coming 'boom' or not. Housing isn't good here either, but
a new apartment complex is being built.

I'm with Justin, it will be interesting what happens this winter to
those trying to sleep in their cars. I feel bad for them, trying to
get ahead under what could be brutal conditions this winter. And
winter could last a long time. We are forcast to get our first snow
on Saturday, Nov. 5.

Must be helping the tax base- as I heard the Baker school system was putting in a new multi million $ sports complex complete with all weather track- and an artificial turf football field (which will be the first Class B school in the state to have one)...

The first snowstorm is scheduled to hit ND on Friday/Sat with several inches of snow predicted...

I did some checking. This isn't anything new, they've been trying to
get this done for 15 years as the track is so poor that no meets are
held here. It wasn't affordable and so nothing was done, and money
was stockpiled or saved. Now with the state wanting our
county's oil money, it was decided to go ahead with the projects. Gym, audiotorium, track, bleachers...
Guess Baker should have it before some other county since it
was money generated here in the first place. Not that I agree
with what it's being spent on...
 

mrj

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One good thing I've heard about all this in ND is that their taxes are really getting cut due to the amount oil interests are paying.

IMO, I'd rather put up with some of the usual 'boom town' miseries than get so much oil from countries determined to exterminate us!

Sure would make a mess of ones' ranch, especially if there were no oil royalties, tho, I've heard that there is compensation to the person owning or leasing, for 'nuisance damages', which would help make it tolerable.

I hope I would NOT be one of those NIMBY's, fighting against either the wells or the pipelines in a similar situation.

The proposed Keystone pipeline going through our area will be paying some significant property taxes into counties they pass through, as well as to the state, and to the land-owners they cross.

I did attend a hearing on it and was shocked at the vile accusations and claims against it by people who are teamed up with the extremist eco-worshipping groups.

mrj
 

Faster horses

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I don't know about your state, mrj, but here we get 'surface damage'
if you own the land but don't own the mineral rights. If you own
the mineral rights and sell them or lease them, you still get surface
damage. Even if the surveyors do damage it applies.
 

mrj

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FH, your term is more accurate than mine. We had an elderly friend in NM who had purchased his ranch and didn't get mineral rights, who said He really appreciated that they paid something to him whenever they were working on his land. I'm pretty sure he had a good relationship with the oil crews.

How the land owner treats the crews can make a difference in how that rancher is treated by the crew, too.

mrj
 

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