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PACKERS (NCBA) to run Mandatory ID

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Anonymous

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NCBA Clouds Already Murky ID Outlook
"NCBA is prepared on behalf of cattlemen to take a leadership role in implementing a private, voluntary, value-driven animal ID system. We want to build a program that will meet the government's legitimate needs, but keeps government interference out of our business to every extent possible." That's what Mike John, president-elect of the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) told folks May 13.

In fact, the organization's Web site ( www.beefusa.org in the "Cattlemen's Capitol Concerns" section, May 12) mentions that NCBA's Animal ID Commission hopes to begin implementation of its voluntary, multi-species plan Oct. 1. To that end, earlier this month, NCBA requested proposals from companies deemed able to provide software and meet specifications for what the organization calls a National Animal ID Database.

Problem is NCBA has provided no details of its plan to the industry. There was a white paper NCBA unveiled in February but it contains even less detail, and presents more questions, than can be found in USDA's Draft Strategic Plan and Draft Program Standards for the National Animal Identification System (NAIS), which has been years in the making.

There's nothing intrinsically wrong with NCBA's desire to create a private national database capable of collecting NAIS-compliant data, if that's what NCBA's membership wants to do. Moreover, NCBA's desire for a private database that is more likely to ensure confidentiality of producer information is understandable, as is the apparent frustration with how slowly USDA is moving forward with NAIS.

However, to intimate the organization can or should implement such a system in less than four months defies logic.

For one thing, in order to comply with NAIS, which all livestock producers must do by 2008 on a mandatory basis (which NAIS currently calls for), you'd have to get the consensus of USDA and state animal health officials, which seems unlikely.

For another, achieving the 48-hour traceback capability of NAIS requires premises ID, which USDA embarked upon last year. There are 2.1 million farms listed in the 2002 Census of Agriculture. Just over 1 million of those have beef or dairy cattle.

That means 1 million premises are in need of registration, just for cattle. As of May 13, according to the official NAIS Web site ( www.usda.gov/nais), 74,340 premises had been registered within 47 states and five tribes.

For another...well, the list runs deeper than a mineshaft in the Grand Canyon.

Never mind the fact that a trade organization with a long history, such as NCBA, has as many enemies as it does fans. It carries plenty of baggage into a proposal that requires support from most cattle producers if it's to be successful, especially on the voluntary basis NCBA champions.

"We do not feel that a government-controlled system can offer cattlemen either the confidentiality or the value component that we feel are absolutely essential for a successful program. But having said that, we very much want to work constructively -- and not in conflict -- with USDA," John said. "The livestock industry needs to make sure that USDA is comfortable with our program, and that it meets USDA's needs in terms of animal health and traceback capability in the event of an animal health emergency."

He might have added NCBA needs to make sure the livestock industry is comfortable with NCBA taking the ID bull by the horns for themselves, the rest of the beef and dairy cattle producers who are not NCBA members, as well as producers of other livestock species.

The NCBA notion, based on John's comments, is that the market will push NAIS compliance faster than government. That's hard to quibble with. Keeping the system voluntary certainly has emotional appeal, too. In our opinion, though, if the industry and government truly want 48-hour traceback, it will require a government mandate driven by the market, rather than wishful thinking that the market will assume the risks of a voluntary program. It will require cooperation and coordination, not various species and different trade organizations launching out on their own, which in effect adds confusion to the marketplace and slows the progress of what has already been an interminably sluggish odyssey.

Whether you agree with NCBA's intent or not, producers should demand detailed answers from NCBA before seriously entertaining the plausibility of a plan so far offered up only in general terms.

Remember also that USDA is accepting public comment on its NAIS Draft Strategic Plan and Draft Program Standards until July 6. Comments can be submitted at www.usda.gov/nais.
-- Wes Ishmael, BEEF Stocker Trends
 

HAY MAKER

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What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck
 

mrj

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HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

Haymaker, guess you were absent school when your peers studied the dictionary. The word VOLUNTARY means "endowed with , possessing, or exercising free choice.

Which means that the NCBA members who so choose may use a voluntary form of value adding ID for our herds so that we can gain the benefits of such information as we choose to provide to the buyers of our cattle. You can keep on hiding the identity of your cattle and selling them through your favorite auction market as commodity/generic/unknown origin cattle. Private enterprise at its best!

MRJ

MRJ
 

agman

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HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

And record high prices follow-how do you figure that Haymaker?
 

CattleCo

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I can see 16000+ R-Calf members giving NCBA their data!!!!!!!!
NCBA is way off on this deal. They need to focus on promoting beef and let the USDA keep the "zip codes" of the cattle!! As for the USDA knowing how many cattle we have on the land.......they already know and have ways of determining that with out mandated records!
 

HAY MAKER

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agman said:
HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

And record high prices follow-how do you figure that Haymaker?


How do you know record high prices will follow?ncba aint pulled off this trick yet,and I doubt they will ............good luck I know your crystal ball is good agman, but I dont think its that good .
 
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MRJ said:
HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

Haymaker, guess you were absent school when your peers studied the dictionary. The word VOLUNTARY means "endowed with , possessing, or exercising free choice.

Which means that the NCBA members who so choose may use a voluntary form of value adding ID for our herds so that we can gain the benefits of such information as we choose to provide to the buyers of our cattle. You can keep on hiding the identity of your cattle and selling them through your favorite auction market as commodity/generic/unknown origin cattle. Private enterprise at its best!

MRJ

MRJ


MRJ- Where do you get "VOLUNTARY" out of Mandatory ID-- The government is mandating it-- this says you have to have it-- then NCBA comes along and says we will do it voluntarily before the mandate, BUT then by 200? it will be mandatory and we will be running the program...This doesn't sound voluntary to me---

In fact it stinks to high heaven-- A Political Lobbyist Group running a Government Mandated Program---Will the donations to the Bush Campaign and numerous Congressmens campaigns buy them the ID program???? Smells worse than a cess pool......
 

HAY MAKER

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Oldtimer said:
MRJ said:
HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

Haymaker, guess you were absent school when your peers studied the dictionary. The word VOLUNTARY means "endowed with , possessing, or exercising free choice.

Which means that the NCBA members who so choose may use a voluntary form of value adding ID for our herds so that we can gain the benefits of such information as we choose to provide to the buyers of our cattle. You can keep on hiding the identity of your cattle and selling them through your favorite auction market as commodity/generic/unknown origin cattle. Private enterprise at its best!

MRJ

MRJ


MRJ- Where do you get "VOLUNTARY" out of Mandatory ID-- The government is mandating it-- this says you have to have it-- then NCBA comes along and says we will do it voluntarily before the mandate, BUT then by 200? it will be mandatory and we will be running the program...This doesn't sound voluntary to me---

In fact it stinks to high heaven-- A Political Lobbyist Group running a Government Mandated Program---
Will the donations to the Bush Campaign and numerous Congressmens campaigns buy them the ID program???? Smells worse than a cess pool......


It might ,IT damn sure bought the check off.When the ncba endorsed G Bush I stated that was gonna be the dumbest or wisest thing the ncba ever did,the answer to that one is obvious...........good luck
 

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Animal ID: Time to get on board

Patricia R. McCoy
Idaho Staff Writer

BOISE – John Falen of Orovada, Nev., has already started tagging this year’s calf crop with his premises identification number. John Field of Weiser, Idaho, has individually tagged each calf crop for the past 35 years.

Both agreed: A national animal identification program is coming, and it’s time for all ranchers to get on board.

“We’re late to the party already. Australia and New Zealand already have programs. Australia did it at the request of the United States, because of a brucellosis outbreak several years ago. Now we need it ourselves, especially if we want our Japanese market back,” Field said.

The Japanese market closed to U.S. cattle after a Canadian cow infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, was found in Washington state in December 2003.

“I’ve talked to a lot of people who are afraid of animal identification, but they’re not seeing the bigger picture,” Field said. “Good electronic tags will take care of it. That’s not rocket science. It’s a health issue nationally, but it will take care of other things as well. On my ranch, for instance, I know the date all my calves were born, their dam and other information.”

Falen also likes being able to verify the ages of his calves and some of the other management helps that ID’ing his herd promises to bring.

“From USDA’s side, age verification and some of these other things are a little controversial. Federal people keep stressing the disease-control side of this, but it will bring other advantages. Over time, they’ll help our marketing,” he said.

Both agreed: Animal ID is going to happen.

“We as ranchers have to get on board, and make the program do what we need it to do,” said Falen.

Falen and Field were among about 135 persons attending an animal ID symposium in Boise May 17. Getting on board was a major theme of the day.

Several speakers pointed out that the USDA is seeking comments until June 6 on exactly how the program should work, Producers can comment easily, by going to the USDA website at ww.usda.gov/nais.

If the United States doesn’t launch animal identification, it will be left behind and never regain its global markets, said Rick Stott, chairman of the Northwest Pilot Project.

NWPP, sponsor of the daylong symposium, has a USDA grant to work on developing an animal ID program in the seven Western brand states.

“We as an industry need to stop fighting among ourselves, take charge and develop a program that will work for us. The USDA is listening. They want your input. Congress wants your input. Your senators and representatives want to know what they can do to help you with this,” Stott said.

Stott recently met with senior staffers of the U.S. Senate and House agriculture committees in Washington, D.C.

“Several members of Congress are introducing or preparing legislation mandating a national animal ID program now. We as an industry had better get our act together, or we’ll have something imposed on us we may not like,” he said.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association recently issued requests for proposals to companies that write computer programs, looking for a good design for a national data base, Stott said.

Confidentiality is a major concern for many cattlemen. That’s why a national database must be managed privately, not by government, said Bob Skinner, Jordan Valley rancher and NWPP board member.

“Security and confidentiality are big deals for all of us who run on public rangelands. I’ve been involved in the public lands arena for several years. There is a faction of the public out there that doesn’t want us to exist. They will use our own information against us in any way they can. The system absolutely must be secure,” said Skinner, a past president of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association.

The symposium was sponsored by the Northwest Pilot Project. Participants included state department of agriculture officials assigned to work with animal ID from seven states: California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Each one reported to the audience how far along their state is in assigning premises ID numbers, the first step in launching individual animal ID.
 

mrj

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Oldtimer said:
MRJ said:
HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

Haymaker, guess you were absent school when your peers studied the dictionary. The word VOLUNTARY means "endowed with , possessing, or exercising free choice.

Which means that the NCBA members who so choose may use a voluntary form of value adding ID for our herds so that we can gain the benefits of such information as we choose to provide to the buyers of our cattle. You can keep on hiding the identity of your cattle and selling them through your favorite auction market as commodity/generic/unknown origin cattle. Private enterprise at its best!

MRJ

MRJ


MRJ- Where do you get "VOLUNTARY" out of Mandatory ID-- The government is mandating it-- this says you have to have it-- then NCBA comes along and says we will do it voluntarily before the mandate, BUT then by 200? it will be mandatory and we will be running the program...This doesn't sound voluntary to me---

In fact it stinks to high heaven-- A Political Lobbyist Group running a Government Mandated Program---Will the donations to the Bush Campaign and numerous Congressmens campaigns buy them the ID program???? Smells worse than a cess pool......

OT, do you really believe that there will only be ONE giant M-ID program? It seems to me the government is encouraging states and others to come up with coordinating programs and not leave it all to government, for a welcome change.

You go ahead with your branding only program, and I will go with RFID system through my cattlemens organization. My bet is on the NCBA for the most reliable and confidential system for our members and anyone else who wants to get going with this.

MRJ
 

mrj

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STAFF said:
Animal ID: Time to get on board

Patricia R. McCoy
Idaho Staff Writer

BOISE – John Falen of Orovada, Nev., has already started tagging this year’s calf crop with his premises identification number. John Field of Weiser, Idaho, has individually tagged each calf crop for the past 35 years.

Both agreed: A national animal identification program is coming, and it’s time for all ranchers to get on board.

“We’re late to the party already. Australia and New Zealand already have programs. Australia did it at the request of the United States, because of a brucellosis outbreak several years ago. Now we need it ourselves, especially if we want our Japanese market back,” Field said.

The Japanese market closed to U.S. cattle after a Canadian cow infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, was found in Washington state in December 2003.

“I’ve talked to a lot of people who are afraid of animal identification, but they’re not seeing the bigger picture,” Field said. “Good electronic tags will take care of it. That’s not rocket science. It’s a health issue nationally, but it will take care of other things as well. On my ranch, for instance, I know the date all my calves were born, their dam and other information.”

Falen also likes being able to verify the ages of his calves and some of the other management helps that ID’ing his herd promises to bring.

“From USDA’s side, age verification and some of these other things are a little controversial. Federal people keep stressing the disease-control side of this, but it will bring other advantages. Over time, they’ll help our marketing,” he said.

Both agreed: Animal ID is going to happen.

“We as ranchers have to get on board, and make the program do what we need it to do,” said Falen.

Falen and Field were among about 135 persons attending an animal ID symposium in Boise May 17. Getting on board was a major theme of the day.

Several speakers pointed out that the USDA is seeking comments until June 6 on exactly how the program should work, Producers can comment easily, by going to the USDA website at ww.usda.gov/nais.

If the United States doesn’t launch animal identification, it will be left behind and never regain its global markets, said Rick Stott, chairman of the Northwest Pilot Project.

NWPP, sponsor of the daylong symposium, has a USDA grant to work on developing an animal ID program in the seven Western brand states.

“We as an industry need to stop fighting among ourselves, take charge and develop a program that will work for us. The USDA is listening. They want your input. Congress wants your input. Your senators and representatives want to know what they can do to help you with this,” Stott said.

Stott recently met with senior staffers of the U.S. Senate and House agriculture committees in Washington, D.C.

“Several members of Congress are introducing or preparing legislation mandating a national animal ID program now. We as an industry had better get our act together, or we’ll have something imposed on us we may not like,” he said.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association recently issued requests for proposals to companies that write computer programs, looking for a good design for a national data base, Stott said.

Confidentiality is a major concern for many cattlemen. That’s why a national database must be managed privately, not by government, said Bob Skinner, Jordan Valley rancher and NWPP board member.

“Security and confidentiality are big deals for all of us who run on public rangelands. I’ve been involved in the public lands arena for several years. There is a faction of the public out there that doesn’t want us to exist. They will use our own information against us in any way they can. The system absolutely must be secure,” said Skinner, a past president of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association.

The symposium was sponsored by the Northwest Pilot Project. Participants included state department of agriculture officials assigned to work with animal ID from seven states: California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Each one reported to the audience how far along their state is in assigning premises ID numbers, the first step in launching individual animal ID.

Excellent post, STAFF. Information desperately needed by ranchers who may be relying too much on the wrong advice from those with another agenda in this matter.

MRJ
 

STAFF

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MRJ,Yes there is not enough ID info and what ranchers and farmers can use everyday while managing their operations.Also Confidentiality is a major concern for many cattlemen. That’s why a national database must be managed privately, not by government, said Bob Skinner, Jordan Valley rancher and NWPP board member.

“Security and confidentiality are big deals for all of us who run on public rangelands. I’ve been involved in the public lands arena for several years. There is a faction of the public out there that doesn’t want us to exist. They will use our own information against us in any way they can. The system absolutely must be secure,” said Skinner, a past president of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association.
This is the reason we run 128 bit encryption on all pages of www.ScoringAg.com ,even on the login in pages.We are all business with no advertizing or popups.
 

PORKER

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I am not trying to be funny here but a hot brand is a premises code.What are you saying MIKE ,Here in Michigan our premises code is 10 digits long and I would say it couldn't be done unless you bought a read/ write chip an injected it under the skin but I don't think that is legal .Probable Staff is the only one that could give you a correct answer if their is one.I hear that the RFID tags have to have the US goverment flag sheild on it.They sure don't have them now and I think it's kinda of stupid anyway.Why don't you just use SSI's data base as you can put just about everything in it including your premises code.
 

mrj

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Oldtimer said:
MRJ said:
HAY MAKER said:
What a deal!!!!!! packers have the ncba gather information ,on herd health,breed, age,herd size so they can adjust their captive supplies better to control the price of cattle..............good luck

Haymaker, guess you were absent school when your peers studied the dictionary. The word VOLUNTARY means "endowed with , possessing, or exercising free choice.

Which means that the NCBA members who so choose may use a voluntary form of value adding ID for our herds so that we can gain the benefits of such information as we choose to provide to the buyers of our cattle. You can keep on hiding the identity of your cattle and selling them through your favorite auction market as commodity/generic/unknown origin cattle. Private enterprise at its best!

MRJ

MRJ


MRJ- Where do you get "VOLUNTARY" out of Mandatory ID-- The government is mandating it-- this says you have to have it-- then NCBA comes along and says we will do it voluntarily before the mandate, BUT then by 200? it will be mandatory and we will be running the program...This doesn't sound voluntary to me---

{First, did NCBA say anything was set in stone at this date? Obviously there is information government will need, and more that they will not need. NCBA has been in the lead promoting the idea that anything not necessary to security and animal health must be controled by the cattle owner, either not accessible or useable by government entities. That is the value added side of the information which MUST be controlled by the owner of the animal. Just as obviously (to anyone not trying to cause trouble) the security info must be mandatory and the value added info must be voluntary for the system to work and be trustworthy.

MRJ}

In fact it stinks to high heaven-- A Political Lobbyist Group running a Government Mandated Program---Will the donations to the Bush Campaign and numerous Congressmens campaigns buy them the ID program???? Smells worse than a cess pool......

{Guess I missed where NCBA would be "running" the whole show on MID. Haven't we read that there most likely will be several programs, coordinated as needed? However I have no doubt that IF it was run by NCBA, it would be a class operation, serving the industry well, with high value for the dollars spent. BTW, how would that be different than a cattle organization running a brand inspection system and making a substantial profit on it?

MRJ
 

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