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Perry's Secessionist Statement

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Mike

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No particular reason for posting this other than to show OT as lying again. :lol:



The myth that just won't go away...

Here is a transcript of the actual conversation with Kelley Shannon, Austin correspondent for the Associated Press. Shannon initially asked if Perry thought the Tea Party gathering they were at reflected a national movement. Perry answered that it could be and that people feel strangled by spending and taxation; they want help. Shannon then asked Perry about some associating him with the idea of secession or sovereignty for Texas:

"Oh, I think there’s a lot of different scenarios," Perry said. "Texas is a unique place. When we came in the union in 1845, one of the issues was that we would be able to leave if we decided to do that."

"You know, my hope is that America and Washington in particular pays attention. We’ve got a great union. There is absolutely no reason to dissolve it. But if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American people, you know, who knows what may come out of that? So. But Texas is a very unique place and we’re a pretty independent lot to boot."

OT wrote:
And Perry wants to secede from the union...
 

Mike

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Again:
Governor says Texas is one state that could leave union, though he's not pushing it.
By W. Gardner Selby, Jason Embry
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Friday, April 17, 2009
Gov. Rick Perry on Thursday stuck by his earlier statement that Texas can secede from the United States — a far-reaching, legally questionable prospect that nevertheless drew Perry a fresh favorable mention by Rush Limbaugh, one of the nation's leading conservative voices.

The idea of secession — which Perry did not endorse — surfaced suddenly Wednesday after Perry appeared at an anti-tax "tea party" at Austin City Hall, where some in his U.S. flag-waving audience shouted, "Secede!"

According to The Associated Press, Perry suggested in response to a reporter's question that Texans might at some point get so fed up with Democratic-led actions in Washington that they would want to secede.

"There's a lot of different scenarios," Perry said. "We've got a great union. There's absolutely no reason to dissolve it. But if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American people, you know, who knows what might come out of that? But Texas is a very unique place, and we're a pretty independent lot to boot."

On Thursday, Perry called potential secession a "side issue of Texas history. ... We are very proud of our Texas history; people discuss and debate the issues of can we break ourselves into five states, can we secede, a lot of interesting things that I'm sure Oklahoma and Pennsylvania would love to be able to say about their states, but the fact is, they can't because they're not Texas."

A Perry spokeswoman said Perry believes Texas could secede if it wanted.

Sanford Levinson, a professor at the School of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, said that between the Texas Constitution, the U.S. Constitution and the 1845 Joint Resolution Annexing Texas to the United States, there is no explicit right for the state to return to its days as a republic.

"We actually fought a war over this issue, and there is no possibility whatsoever that the United States or any court would recognize a 'right' to secede," Levinson said in an e-mail.

Levinson noted that the 1845 resolution allows for Texas to break itself into five states but doesn't specify whether that would require congressional approval — and forming new states still wouldn't constitute secession.

Limbaugh said on his program Thursday that Perry's speculation on the possibility of secession might awaken conservatives to actions by the federal government that he described as abusing citizens.

"This is not insignificant when the governor of Texas talks about 'we could secede,' " Limbaugh said, according to audio of his comments and a transcript posted online by Media Matters for America, a liberal group that says it corrects conservative misinformation in the media.

Also Thursday, Perry fielded a warm response from more than 800 members of the Texas Federation of Republican Women lunching at the Austin Convention Center.

The group also heard from his expected 2010 GOP primary challenger, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison.

Both drew ovations, though Perry appeared to have the upper hand with audience members who gave him an additional ovation after he reminded them of his desire to see a change in state law requiring voters to present a photo ID at the polls.

Referring to three anti-tax "tea parties" he attended Wednesday, Perry said he felt invigorated and proud of Texans.

"We're fed up with what's coming out of Washington," he said.

He also said that one reason Democrats succeeded nationally last year is that "a lot of us who have worn the jersey of the Republican team have been playing like Democrats"— almost certainly a stab at Hutchison, a senator since 1993.

Perry also saluted state Rep. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, the author of a nonbinding resolution to remind Congress of the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

"I'm talking about states' rights," Perry said.

The governor drew little attention last week when he endorsed Creighton's resolution. But by Tuesday, the online Drudge Report had posted a Perry news release on the proposal. Talk show hosts including conservatives Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Michael Savage and Laura Ingraham shortly picked up the story.

And the governor's Web site has been visited more than 300,000 times since Tuesday, compared with 5,000 times on a typical day, while a video of Perry's appearance with Creighton and other legislators made the top 100 watched videos on the YouTube site.

Hutchison fired an arrow in Perry's direction at the lunch, reminding the red-jacketed activists that Republicans have lost ground in the Texas House as well as local offices in what had been GOP-leaning Harris, Bexar and Dallas counties.

"We have got to regear," Hutchison said.

Referring to grass-roots Republican women, Hutchison said: "We built the Republican Party, and we are going to have to save it."
 

Mike

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Again, from "Factcheck":
What Perry Really Said About Secession



August 23, 2011


The Obama team falsely suggests Texas Gov. Rick Perry advocated secession. Perry's actual remarks have been mischaracterized. Perry entertained a reporter's question about secession after a tea party rally in 2009, and warned that "if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American people, you know, who knows what may come out of that?" But he's made clear all along that "we've got a great union" and there is "no reason to dissolve it."

Perry has carelessly commented that Texas has a unique right to secede from the union, having once been an independent republic. That's a myth, historians say. But Perry never advocated secession.

Perry Never Advocated Secession


Perry has been dogged by mischaracterizations of his secession comments ever since he made them. But with Perry recently declaring himself a Republican candidate for president, those attacks have been ramped up by opponents trying to marginalize his candidacy by dismissing Perry as the guy who once talked about Texas seceding from the union.

In an interview on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Aug. 21, Robert Gibbs, a former White House spokesman and now an adviser for the Obama reelection campaign, was asked about Perry's thinly veiled suggestion that President Barack Obama didn't love his country.


Gibbs, Aug 21: Well, two things come to mind. Rick Perry is the governor who, two years ago, openly talked about whether or not Texas should leave the union. So I think for Rick Perry to, at one point, talk about secession from the union as early as–or as far back as only 2009, I think it's good that he's professed his love for this country. But I'll be honest with you, Savannah, I think the American people are tired of the politics where, if you and I don't agree on something, I question your love of country and your patriotism.

A week earlier, White House spokesman Jay Carney took a similar jab, when he was asked by New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd what he thought about Perry's comment that it would be "treasonous" for Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke to print more money.


Carney, Aug. 16: We may disagree with our political opponents, but we certainly think they’re all patriots — even those who wanted to secede from the union.

Perry's secession comments came after a tea party event in April 2009. They quickly went viral on the Internet and touched off a firestorm of media scrutiny.

Here's the full exchange, which you can watch here, with Associated Press reporter Kelley Shannon:


Shannon: Some have associated you with the idea of secession or sovereignty for your state. …

Perry: I think there’s a lot of different scenarios. Texas is a unique place. When we came in the union in 1845, one of the issues was that we would be able to leave if we decided to do that.

You know, my hope is that America and Washington in particular pays attention. We’ve got a great union. There is absolutely no reason to dissolve it. But if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American people, you know, who knows what may come out of that? But Texas is a very unique place and we’re a pretty independent lot to boot.

Some Perry critics have also pointed to another statement from Perry, this time to a group of tech bloggers taking a tour of his Capitol offices the month before the tea party interview. At one point, according to audio posted on YouTube, Perry tells the group, "When we came into the nation in 1845, we were a republic. We were a stand-alone nation. And one of the deals was, we can leave any time we want. … So we're kind of thinking about that again."


The line was met with laughter, suggesting it was not meant as a serious position statement.

"You do that and I'll move in!" someone is heard to joke back, to more laughter
.

Some may question the prudence of Perry entertaining the suggestion of secession, or talking too loosely about such a radical idea, but any fair-minded reading of Perry's fuller quote, and its context, makes clear that Perry was not advocating for Texas to secede. And Perry has repeatedly said since then that he did not, and does not, advocate secession.

Asked about his comments in a Newsweek interview a year later, Perry told Evan Smith of the Texas Tribune, "I said that we live in an incredibly wonderful country, and I see absolutely no reason for that to ever happen. But I do understand people's concern and anger about what this administration is doing from an economic standpoint–in particular, the long-term debt that's being created for not only them but for future generations."

Can Texas Opt Out?

So Perry has been wrongly portrayed as a secession advocate. But he is wrong when he claims Texas has some unique arrangement that would allow it to secede at will.

Perry's comments suggest the deal was part of the Joint Resolution for Annexing Texas to the United States, which was approved March 1, 1845. But the document neither talks about nor conveys any such right to secede.

“That’s a myth and not based on any historical reality,” said Walter L. Buenger, a professor of history at Texas A&M University and author of the book “Secession and the Union in Texas,” in an interview with FactCheck.org.

And then there's the matter of the Civil War.

“Among scholars, the consensus is that the Civil War settled all these issues," Harvey Tucker, professor in the political science department at Texas A&M, told us. "Texas does not have the right to secede.”

Buenger also pointed to a Supreme Court case in 1869, Texas v. White, in which the court ruled that unilateral secession by any state was unconstitutional.

“On all counts, this is a total fabrication,” Buenger said. “And it reflects poorly on our state that our governor would insist on this.”

The Joint Resolution for Annexing Texas to the United States does talk about allowing Texas to split into five states (four new states plus the State of Texas). But that's different than secession.

And it'll never happen, Tucker said, joking that “we can’t afford to dilute our football talent that way.”

“There is no doubt whatsoever that Texas does not have a reserved right to secede," said Sanford Levinson, professor of government at the School of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, in an exchange of emails with FactCheck.org. "One could argue that the state does have a reserved right to split into five separate states (and thus get a total of ten senators), but, interestingly enough, not even Tom DeLay suggested that.”

– Robert Farley



Posted by Robert Farley on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 at 11:31 am
Filed under The FactCheck Wire · Tagged with Rick Perry, secession
 
A

Anonymous

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He speaks out of both sides of the mouth- talks about secession to fire up the rightwingernutcases-- then says he's not for it when he's trying to look half sane...
If he becomes the Repub nominee- it won't take long for educated folks to see him for the two faced flake he is..


"This is not insignificant when the governor of Texas talks about 'we could secede,' " Limbaugh said.

Even the rightwings voice- Rush, recognizes he was talking about secession...



Perry stands by secession comments
Governor says Texas is one state that could leave union, though he's not pushing it.
By W. Gardner Selby, Jason Embry
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Friday, April 17, 2009
Gov. Rick Perry on Thursday stuck by his earlier statement that Texas can secede from the United States — a far-reaching, legally questionable prospect that nevertheless drew Perry a fresh favorable mention by Rush Limbaugh, one of the nation's leading conservative voices.

The idea of secession — which Perry did not endorse — surfaced suddenly Wednesday after Perry appeared at an anti-tax "tea party" at Austin City Hall, where some in his U.S. flag-waving audience shouted, "Secede!"

Gov. Rick Perry said Thursday there's no reason to dissolve the United States' 'great union' but that he can understand why Washington's recent actions would make some want to.
According to The Associated Press, Perry suggested in response to a reporter's question that Texans might at some point get so fed up with Democratic-led actions in Washington that they would want to secede.

"There's a lot of different scenarios," Perry said. "We've got a great union. There's absolutely no reason to dissolve it. But if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American people, you know, who knows what might come out of that? But Texas is a very unique place, and we're a pretty independent lot to boot."

On Thursday, Perry called potential secession a "side issue of Texas history. ... We are very proud of our Texas history; people discuss and debate the issues of can we break ourselves into five states, can we secede, a lot of interesting things that I'm sure Oklahoma and Pennsylvania would love to be able to say about their states, but the fact is, they can't because they're not Texas."

A Perry spokeswoman said Perry believes Texas could secede if it wanted.

Sanford Levinson, a professor at the School of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, said that between the Texas Constitution, the U.S. Constitution and the 1845 Joint Resolution Annexing Texas to the United States, there is no explicit right for the state to return to its days as a republic.

"We actually fought a war over this issue, and there is no possibility whatsoever that the United States or any court would recognize a 'right' to secede," Levinson said in an e-mail.

Levinson noted that the 1845 resolution allows for Texas to break itself into five states but doesn't specify whether that would require congressional approval — and forming new states still wouldn't constitute secession.

Limbaugh said on his program Thursday that Perry's speculation on the possibility of secession might awaken conservatives to actions by the federal government that he described as abusing citizens.

"This is not insignificant when the governor of Texas talks about 'we could secede,' " Limbaugh said, according to audio of his comments and a transcript posted online by Media Matters for America, a liberal group that says it corrects conservative misinformation in the media.

Also Thursday, Perry fielded a warm response from more than 800 members of the Texas Federation of Republican Women lunching at the Austin Convention Center.

The group also heard from his expected 2010 GOP primary challenger, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison.

Both drew ovations, though Perry appeared to have the upper hand with audience members who gave him an additional ovation after he reminded them of his desire to see a change in state law requiring voters to present a photo ID at the polls.

Referring to three anti-tax "tea parties" he attended Wednesday, Perry said he felt invigorated and proud of Texans.

"We're fed up with what's coming out of Washington," he said.

He also said that one reason Democrats succeeded nationally last year is that "a lot of us who have worn the jersey of the Republican team have been playing like Democrats"— almost certainly a stab at Hutchison, a senator since 1993.

Perry also saluted state Rep. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, the author of a nonbinding resolution to remind Congress of the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

"I'm talking about states' rights," Perry said.

The governor drew little attention last week when he endorsed Creighton's resolution. But by Tuesday, the online Drudge Report had posted a Perry news release on the proposal. Talk show hosts including conservatives Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Michael Savage and Laura Ingraham shortly picked up the story.

And the governor's Web site has been visited more than 300,000 times since Tuesday, compared with 5,000 times on a typical day, while a video of Perry's appearance with Creighton and other legislators made the top 100 watched videos on the YouTube site.

Hutchison fired an arrow in Perry's direction at the lunch, reminding the red-jacketed activists that Republicans have lost ground in the Texas House as well as local offices in what had been GOP-leaning Harris, Bexar and Dallas counties.

"We have got to regear," Hutchison said.

Referring to grass-roots Republican women, Hutchison said: "We built the Republican Party, and we are going to have to save it."
 

Mike

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No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:
 

jingo2

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Mike said:
No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:


So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?
 

Mike

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jingo2 said:
Mike said:
No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:


So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?

Sure stirred you and OT up, huh? :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

hypocritexposer

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jingo2 said:
Mike said:
No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:


So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?


Just another Progressive with a bone to pick with regionalized control, instead of centralized control.

Why is it you Progressives have a problem with constitutional law?

If Perry was stated a fact, fine. If he was advocated for secession, that's a different story.

Which was he doing?

We've had a Province in Canada that has wanted to "separate" for years, if not decades, and when it comes to that issue, progressives/liberals in the US believe they should have the opportunity to unilaterally separate, without taking into account the constitutional law of our Country.

figures......
 
A

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hypocritexposer said:
jingo2 said:
Mike said:
No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:


So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?


Just another Progressive with a bone to pick with regionalized control, instead of centralized control.

Why is it you Progressives have a problem with constitutional law?

If Perry was stated a fact, fine. If he was advocated for secession, that's a different story.

Which was he doing?

We've had a Province in Canada that has wanted to "separate" for years, if not decades, and when it comes to that issue, progressives/liberals in the US believe they should have the opportunity to unilaterally separate, without taking into account the constitutional law of our Country.

figures......

Well I've always opposed Canada separation... I figure you folks deserve all those Frenchmen- and would hate for them to try and become a part of the States...
 

hypocritexposer

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Oldtimer said:
hypocritexposer said:
jingo2 said:
So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?


Just another Progressive with a bone to pick with regionalized control, instead of centralized control.

Why is it you Progressives have a problem with constitutional law?

If Perry was stated a fact, fine. If he was advocated for secession, that's a different story.

Which was he doing?

We've had a Province in Canada that has wanted to "separate" for years, if not decades, and when it comes to that issue, progressives/liberals in the US believe they should have the opportunity to unilaterally separate, without taking into account the constitutional law of our Country.

figures......

Well I've always opposed Canada separation... I figure you folks deserve all those Frenchmen- and would hate for them to try and become a part of the States...


Good for you. But they wouldn't become part of the US, but they might just stop selling you hydro and opt to sell it to Canada instead.
 

jingo2

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Mike said:
jingo2 said:
Mike said:
No. He mentions secession to stir up the Leftwing fruitcakes.

Have you come across the one where he said he "Wanted" to secede yet? :lol:


So he is hero if he just talks smack to cause trouble for the sake of it?

Like you?

Sure stirred you and OT up, huh? :lol: :lol: :lol:


No, he is jusst as full of shite as you are.

All talk and no game....all hat and no cows.....etc

There is nothing to people like your type, except their own ego.
 

hopalong

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Kinda like when you invented allie to boost your falling popularity. :wink: :wink:
Better go check your TRUST fund lulu with obama you may not have much left.
oldtimer and kolo=jingo=lulu=allie deserve each other :D :D :D :D
 

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