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pknoeber

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OK, here's my disclaimer, I'm just a farmer who occasionally does some backgrounding/stocker/wheat pasture so I'm no Temple Gardner, but how can what our clocks say afffect livestock? Our cattle usually seem pretty unimpressed by most things we've done, so does Congress think they'll be upset if we change their lunch time? Oh yeah, been reading a long time, keep up the good work everybody.

Taken off of CNN.com

"WASHINGTON (AP) -- An agreement was reached Thursday to extend daylight-saving time in an effort to conserve energy, but not to the extent the House approved in April.

House and Senate negotiators on an energy bill agreed to begin daylight-saving time three weeks earlier, on the second Sunday in March, and extend it by one week to the first Sunday in November. The House bill would have added a month in the spring and another in the fall.

According to some senators, farmers complained that a two-month extension could adversely affect livestock, and airline officials said it would have complicated scheduling of international flights.

"We ought to take a hard look at this before we jump into it," said Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, who questioned how much oil savings the extension would produce.

Reps. Edward Markey, D-Massachusetts, and Fred Upton, R-Michigan, agreed to scale back their original proposal, and Senate negotiators accepted the new version, along with a call for a study on how much daylight-saving time actually affects oil consumption.

"The beauty of daylight-saving time is that it just makes everyone feel sunnier," said Markey.

Upton noted that the extension means daylight-saving time will continue through Halloween, adding to safety. "Kids across the nation will soon rejoice," said Upton, because they'll have another hour of daylight trick-or-treating."
 
A

Anonymous

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pnknoeber- Most the time anymore I don't even pack a watch let alone have one for the cows :lol: :lol:

The only ones I ever saw that it benefited were the nine to fivers that got a little more after work daylight- personally I wish they would stick with one or the other year around-- either way anymore the implement dealers are closed during half the daylight hours when you need parts anyway......
 

Mudhen

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Oldtimer said:
pnknoeber- Most the time anymore I don't even pack a watch let alone have one for the cows :lol: :lol:

The only ones I ever saw that it benefited were the nine to fivers that got a little more after work daylight- personally I wish they would stick with one or the other year around-- either way anymore the implement dealers are closed during half the daylight hours when you need parts anyway......

COULDN'T SAY IT BETTER MY SELF
 

rancher

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I would say it would bother the dairy people.
 

rancher

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Big Muddy rancher said:
Rancher are you coming to Deadwood for the reunion. Promise we won't put a tracking device on your truck. :cowboy:

:shock: :shock: :shock:
 

CarlB

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The cattle don't much care, I just went out and asked them. I'm not much for this though.
 

jigs

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just did a straw poll and the results showed the black cattle wanted daylight savings time, while the red cattle did not. the mixed colored cattle had no opinion either way. and with or without DST, the black cattle averaged more at the barn, while the reds gained more.

one group has dcided that this matter is directly tied to the closing of the canadian border and has went ahead with an injunction to stop it. if stopping time, I hope they stop it at lunch, that is my favorite hour.

the Pork board is concerned that ending DST will somehow limit the reckless spending of the checkoff dollars, and are affraid of the accountability that it could bring.

those on unemployment and welfare think there should be more hours in the day, so working folks could earn more, thus paying them more!


Farmers figure they will work till it is done no matter the time, and know they will get screwed no matter what happens, like always.

Bill Clinton would prefere more dark hours....seems that is where he does most of his "work"


This was taken directly from CNN

(if offended by any of the above, lighten up, life is too short)
 

Soapweed

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pknoeber: "Upton noted that the extension means daylight-saving time will continue through Halloween, adding to safety. "Kids across the nation will soon rejoice," said Upton, "because they'll have another hour of daylight trick-or-treating." "

Things must have changed since I was a kid. We always had to wait until dark before we could even go trick-or-treating. This would completely defeat the purpose, because if a kid didn't start until after dark, it would be very late when they got back home and in bed.

Kinda like the old Indian cutting a foot off the top of his blanket and sewing it on the bottom of the blanket, to keep his feet warm. That part worked, but then his nose got cold. I always used to think ol' Ben Franklin was a fairly smart feller, but he is supposedly the yahoo that came up with the idea of "daylight saving time." It was a pretty poor idea that almost cancels out all the good that he did.
 

Silver

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I have to agree with you there, Soapweed. I guess they figured us rednecks up here weren't smart enough to change our clocks so they left us right out of the dst loop. Suits me just fine.
I don't understand though why big business would stand for something so confusing for international trade though. Seems like another step back. But whatever. I set my clocks when I buy them.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Here in Sask. we don't chage time anymore.The time zone split the province so they said that we go on one time year round. Same as Alberta in the summer and Manitoba the winter. Same as Montana in the summer and North Dakota in the winter. It was handy when dating my wife as I could leave at & and pick her up 40 miles away at seven. A bugger coming home as those 40 miles took 2 hours. Usually made it in time for morning chores. :lol: That was in the winter. We got married cause I couldn't afford that much gas for that old Dodge 400 with a 4 barrel carb. :cowboy:
 

nr

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According to this off the internet it wasn't Ben Franklin but the RR that created Standard Time. On down the article talks about Daylight Savings.

History of Standard Time in the U.S.
Standard time in time zones was instituted in the U.S. and Canada by the railroads on 18 November 1883. Before then, time of day was a local matter, and most cities and towns used some form of local solar time, maintained by some well-known clock (for example, on a church steeple or in a jeweler's window). The new standard time system was not immediately embraced by all, however.

Use of standard time gradually increased because of its obvious practical advantages for communication and travel. Standard time in time zones was not established in U.S. law until the Act of March 19, 1918, sometimes called the Standard Time Act. The act also established daylight saving time, itself a contentious idea. Daylight saving time was repealed in 1919, but standard time in time zones remained in law, with the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) having the authority over time zone boundaries. Daylight time became a local matter. It was re-established nationally early in World War II, and was continuously observed until the end of the war. After the war its use varied among states and localities. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 provided standardization in the dates of beginning and end of daylight time in the U.S. but allowed for local exemptions from its observance. The act also continued the authority of the ICC over time zone boundaries. In subsequent years, Congress transferred the authority over time zones to the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), modifed (several times) the beginning date of daylight time, and renamed the three westernmost time zones.

Time zone boundaries have changed greatly since their original introduction and changes still occasionally occur. DOT issues press releases when these changes are made. Generally, time zone boundaries have tended to shift westward. Places on the eastern edge of a time zone can effectively move sunset an hour later (by the clock) by shifting to the time zone immediately to their east. If they do so, the boundary of that zone is locally shifted to the west; the accumulation of such changes results in the long-term westward trend. The process is not inexorable, however, since the late sunrises experienced by such places during the winter may be regarded as too undersirable. Furthermore, under the law, the principal standard for deciding on a time zone change is the "convenience of commerce." Proposed time zone changes have been both approved and rejected based on this criterion, although most such proposals have been accepted.
 

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