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Question for George or anyone else

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TimH

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George , I was wondering if you or anybody else has ever tried using "cement stabilization"(aka soil cement) in muddy or high traffic cattle handling areas or if you think it would stand up to cattle?
For those of you who may not know what "cement stabilization" means, it is simply a process of mixing dry cement powder with the existing soil in an area, adding some water during mixing and then packing it in place.It sets up pretty hard, if it is done right, and is relatively cheap to do.
I have seen it done on various construction projects, usually with sand or gravel as the base, but always with either more gravel or asphalt put on top of it .
I was thinking about trying it in some gateways and around some waterers but I'm not sure how it would hold up with the cattle walking directly on top of it.
Any thoughts??
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Before we poured a cement pad in front of our feed bunks we tried some groung stabilizer plastic mesh that you laid down and put a crushed rock on top of. We had problems because the dump truck was to back down on top of what he dumped not drive on the mesh so it buckled but it might have worked better for gates and what not rather then at the bunks with so much pushing and hoof digging.
 

TimH

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Big Muddy rancher said:
Before we poured a cement pad in front of our feed bunks we tried some groung stabilizer plastic mesh that you laid down and put a crushed rock on top of. We had problems because the dump truck was to back down on top of what he dumped not drive on the mesh so it buckled but it might have worked better for gates and what not rather then at the bunks with so much pushing and hoof digging.

Yup. I'm familiar with that stuff, too. It's sometimes called geo-grid or geo-textile. I'm trying to get away from having to haul any gravel or anything else in here because I'm tooooo cheap!!! No shortage of sand around here,though!! :)

How was the drive home BMR? Pretty decent tail-wind you had today!!!
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Good drive home but sure was tired. Had a good time in Virden but Big Beaver beat Manitoba cause we had 6 dances to 2 at Three in the morning when the music stopped. It was supposed to stop at 2 but a friend of Tiff's paid the guy for another hour. I could have choked her cause i was tired and had to drive some home.. Oh well a good time was had by all and maybe we can hook up another time for coffee, It was to loud to visit with that music blaring. Manitoba Rancher didn't make it so will have to catch him another time as well. I think I'll be in bed by 7;30 tonight.
 

George

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That is widely used in road construction around here in bad weather but it needs to be covered with black top or concrete quickly as it will break down with continued water.

I have heard of the plastic mesh and it sounds like it holds promise but I don't know of any in use.
 

wdcook

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We have used geo-textile fabric topped with rock for several years now in corrals, thru gateways, and last year along and under 200' of fenceline bunk. It works great and is a better surface than concrete because it doesn't get nearly as slick when wet. Imperative to use bigger rock (we use 2") on top of fabric, then cover with a coating of a fine material (we use what is called base rock-could use waste lime). Ends up not being a lot cheaper than concrete, but can all be done with one man, tractor and blade. That plus the better surface for cattle makes it worthwhile. It does take a minor amount of additional surface material every few years.
 

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