• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

R-CALF in Oregon

Help Support Ranchers.net:

A

Anonymous

Guest
10/18/2005 3:25:00 PM


R-CALF: CEO’s Debut In Northeastern Oregon A Tremendous Success



(Pendleton, Ore.) – R-CALF USA CEO Bill Bullard recently spoke to an eager crowd of independent cattle producers at a meeting in Pendleton, Ore., and the feedback afterward was enormous, with requests for Bullard to speak elsewhere in Oregon and Washington. The Oregon Livestock Producers Association (OLPA), an R-CALF USA affiliate organization, sponsored the event.



Bullard opened his discussion by saying U.S. cattle producers must understand that cattle producers, along with packers, processors and other downstream segments of the industry are each part of the very profitable beef-industry supply chain, and U.S. cattle producers are in competition with these other segments to achieve their share of the profits within the industry.



“It is important for producers to appreciate the fact that while they are integral partners in the beef supply chain, the economic interests of packers are quite different from the economic interests of the producer,” said Bullard. “It is critical that U.S. cattle producers defend their own interests, and you do that by getting involved.



“There are three fronts within the industry in which producers must participate – industry structure, economics and politics,” he continued. “Regarding industry structure and its foundation, cattle producers and the rural businesses those producers support, it is imperative that this sector work together to ensure that the U.S. cattle industry continues to be comprised of independent cattle producers – small businesses all across America – that independently make decisions regarding the terms of their production and the terms of marketing.



“On the economic front, we must defend open, transparent, and competitive markets to ensure that our income is derived from a competitive marketplace, not from government price supports or subsidies,” Bullard emphasized. “And finally, producers must use the political system to ensure that the rules that define our market facilitate robust competition while preventing any segment of the beef supply chain from exerting undue influence over the other segments, particularly the live-cattle production segment.



“R-CALF USA helps producers achieve these goals,” Bullard said.



Following his talk, Bullard fielded questions from the floor.



Bullard outlined how R-CALF USA was part of a broad coalition that was instrumental in getting Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling (M-COOL) included in the 2002 Farm Bill, and that consumers should have the right to choose exactly what to feed their families – which beef in the meat counter is from the U.S. and which is from other countries.



Bullard also explained how the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shifted its disease-control standards from that of preventing the introduction of foreign animal diseases into the United States to an attitude that the introduction of disease is inevitable, so the agency’s focus now is simply to manage those diseases once they arrive.



“It is extremely enlightening for producers to listen to Bill Bullard, as he asks them to imagine themselves as meat packers, and to see how that helps them to understand the big picture of what is happening in the industry,” commented R-CALF USA National Membership Co-Chair Margene Eiguren. “The big picture dictates that in order for producers to survive, we must know the facts and stand up for our best interests, not the best interests of other segments of the industry.”



R-CALF USA Oregon Region 3 Membership Chair Vicki Fleshman worked tirelessly to coordinate the event.



“I want to thank all those who attended and donated to the success of our first Umatilla County get-together,” said Fleshman. “A special thank-you to Bill Bullard for his special way of presenting the facts and the current events affecting our industry. I know that those who attended went home feeling more educated and motivated to help our industry and, likewise, those in our industry.



“The most important thing we can all do is stick together,” she said. “There are always some that do not participate or are apathetic, but we must continue to do what we can for all of those small producers in the cattle industry,” Fleshman continued. “Our job, as individuals, is to gain more members, create more funding opportunities in support of the one organization that is truly fighting for us – R-CALF.”



Fleshman said if every R-CALF USA member recruited just one new member, the national organization would soon grow to more than 36,000 cattle producers.



“We are half way there,” she exclaimed. “Plant a seed and watch it grow. To have a good harvest, we must sow.”



The silent auction and meeting raised more than $600 for R-CALF USA. Items were donated by Pamela Wunderlich; Vicki Fleshman; Margene Eiguren; and Ami-Pro/Kyle Robinson. Contributors included: Glen and Kelly Griffith; Larry and Joan Wade; VP Ranch/Curtis and Cheryl Martin; T Schaafsma Ranch; Mike and Elaine Smith; and Mike and Joanie Fluit. Dinner was served by the Red Lion Hotel.
 

Big Muddy rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
22,159
Reaction score
379
Location
Big Muddy valley
" Bill Bullard for his special way of presenting the facts and the current events affecting our industry"

Yea Bill has a special way of delivering the facts alright. :wink:

I think R-CALF might be losing some steam as this time they only raised $600 dollars. That's only worth about 3 hours of lawyers fees. :cowboy:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Big Muddy rancher said:
I think R-CALF might be losing some steam as this time they only raised $600 dollars. That's only worth about 3 hours of lawyers fees. :cowboy:

But remember each of those HONEST dollars comes from individual cattleman- true grassroots since R-CALF hasn't sold out to Big Business and been annointed by Big Government so they can steal $850,000 from the checkoff whenever they want to, like some of the other organizations apparently do :wink: :mad: :(
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
(
Pendleton, Ore.) – R-CALF USA CEO Bill Bullard recently spoke to an eager crowd of independent cattle producers at a meeting in Pendleton, Ore., and the feedback afterward was enormous, with requests for Bullard to speak elsewhere in Oregon and Washington. The Oregon Livestock Producers Association (OLPA), an R-CALF USA affiliate organization, sponsored the event.
enormous feedback with request to speak elsewhere, Yes how about by the door and then it wouldn't take alot to shove him out and lock it. :wink:


Bullard opened his discussion by saying U.S. cattle producers must understand that cattle producers, along with packers, processors and other downstream segments of the industry are each part of the very profitable beef-industry supply chain, and U.S. cattle producers are in competition with these other segments to achieve their share of the profits within the industry.

Very profitable I thought the slaughter part of the industry were loosing billions and the downstream segments were too. I guess as long as the producer is making good money the rest of the industry can just bite the bullet.

“It is important for producers to appreciate the fact that while they are integral partners in the beef supply chain, the economic interests of packers are quite different from the economic interests of the producer,” said Bullard. “It is critical that U.S. cattle producers defend their own interests, and you do that by getting involved.
Oh great job defend a few more packers out of the business of competeing for your cattle and see what your packer concentration will do to you.



“There are three fronts within the industry in which producers must participate – industry structure, economics and politics,” he continued. “Regarding industry structure and its foundation, cattle producers and the rural businesses those producers support, it is imperative that this sector work together to ensure that the U.S. cattle industry continues to be comprised of independent cattle producers – small businesses all across America – that independently make decisions regarding the terms of their production and the terms of marketing.
Now we're are back to a Cattle industry and looking out for themselves and to he** with the rest of the Beef industry they were a part of two paragraphs ago :wink:


“On the economic front, we must defend open, transparent, and competitive markets to ensure that our income is derived from a competitive marketplace, not from government price supports or subsidies,” Bullard emphasized.
By shutting out competition, thats a real OPEN and competitive market place. Force the packers to buy just from you with no choices.

“And finally, producers must use the political system to ensure that the rules that define our market facilitate robust competition while preventing any segment of the beef supply chain from exerting undue influence over the other segments, particularly the live-cattle production segment.

Well R-CALF is good at using what ever it takes to exert undue influence over the other segments of the industry to limit a competitive marketplace :roll:



“R-CALF USA helps producers achieve these goals,” Bullard said.
Gee it is amazing what a bit of lieing will achieve. :shock:



Following his talk, Bullard fielded questions from the floor.
How many were truthfully answered though. :?



Bullard outlined how R-CALF USA was part of a broad coalition that was instrumental in getting Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling (M-COOL) included in the 2002 Farm Bill, and that consumers should have the right to choose exactly what to feed their families – which beef in the meat counter is from the U.S. and which is from other countries.
But they don't have the right to know where fast food comes from. Maybe the M"COOL" label should read "this meat could have come from the US but if could have also been imported either way it was USDA inspected to meet our standards. :wink:

Bullard also explained how the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shifted its disease-control standards from that of preventing the introduction of foreign animal diseases into the United States to an attitude that the introduction of disease is inevitable, so the agency’s focus now is simply to manage those diseases once they arrive.
Again Bullard forgets BSE has arrived in the US. And if you can manage it from not spreading you should beable to manage anything that could be imported. :roll:

“It is extremely enlightening for producers to listen to Bill Bullard, as he asks them to imagine themselves as meat packers, and to see how that helps them to understand the big picture of what is happening in the industry,” commented R-CALF USA National Membership Co-Chair Margene Eiguren. “The big picture dictates that in order for producers to survive, we must know the facts and stand up for our best interests, not the best interests of other segments of the industry.”
They are expecting facts from R-CALF don't make me laugh :roll:



R-CALF USA Oregon Region 3 Membership Chair Vicki Fleshman worked tirelessly to coordinate the event.

“I want to thank all those who attended and donated to the success of our first Umatilla County get-together,” said Fleshman. “A special thank-you to Bill Bullard for his special way of presenting the facts and the current events affecting our industry. I know that those who attended went home feeling more educated and motivated to help our industry and, likewise, those in our industry.



“The most important thing we can all do is stick together,” she said. “There are always some that do not participate or are apathetic, but we must continue to do what we can for all of those small producers in the cattle industry,” Fleshman continued. “Our job, as individuals, is to gain more members, create more funding opportunities in support of the one organization that is truly fighting for us – R-CALF.”



Fleshman said if every R-CALF USA member recruited just one new member, the national organization would soon grow to more than 36,000 cattle producers.



“We are half way there,” she exclaimed. “Plant a seed and watch it grow. To have a good harvest, we must sow.”

The silent auction and meeting raised more than $600 for R-CALF USA. Items were donated by Pamela Wunderlich; Vicki Fleshman; Margene Eiguren; and Ami-Pro/Kyle Robinson. Contributors included: Glen and Kelly Griffith; Larry and Joan Wade; VP Ranch/Curtis and Cheryl Martin; T Schaafsma Ranch; Mike and Elaine Smith; and Mike and Joanie Fluit. Dinner was served by the Red Lion Hotel.

Gee worked timelessly, R-CALF USA CEO Bill Bullard spoke, feedback afterward was enormous, a list of donators and contributors but the silent auction and meeting raised only $600 for R-CALF USA. :shock: How many more successful fund raiser like this will it take to fund the appeal to the Highest court in the Land. :lol:
 

pointrider

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
218
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Yep, it's truly amazing how many Middle Third (break even 90% of the time) and Bottom Third (lose money 90% of the time) producers keep looking for someone to save them from the industry they choose to participate in of their own free will. I doubt that many Top Third producers (make a profit 90% of the time) were among the "enthusiastic supporters" in the meeting.

Cow-calf production is commodity agriculture. As a result, the variation in profitability will continue to lead to more consolidation, more selling out to developers, more fewer and larger, etc., etc. As this occurs, new Thirds are created, and the beat goes on.

I do not believe that R-Calf or NCBA or anyone else can stop this from happening as long as the cow-calf business remains commodity, free enterprise and capitalistic by nature. The Top Third producers will be the survivors, and producers need to spend more time finding out where they rank and what to do about it.
 

Econ101

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
7,060
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
pointrider said:
Yep, it's truly amazing how many Middle Third (break even 90% of the time) and Bottom Third (lose money 90% of the time) producers keep looking for someone to save them from the industry they choose to participate in of their own free will. I doubt that many Top Third producers (make a profit 90% of the time) were among the "enthusiastic supporters" in the meeting.

Cow-calf production is commodity agriculture. As a result, the variation in profitability will continue to lead to more consolidation, more selling out to developers, more fewer and larger, etc., etc. As this occurs, new Thirds are created, and the beat goes on.

I do not believe that R-Calf or NCBA or anyone else can stop this from happening as long as the cow-calf business remains commodity, free enterprise and capitalistic by nature. The Top Third producers will be the survivors, and producers need to spend more time finding out where they rank and what to do about it.

That is an inevitable result of a cheap food policy. You hit it on the head, piontrider. The Jap farmers don't have a cheap food policy and they also don't spend as much money on overweight health problems either. Their farmers have real political muscle. Quality over quantity. The U.S. doesn't have to have the same policy as Japan, but the one we have now is really anti-producer. Almost all subsidies to correct the problem only exacerbates it and the result is more corporate welfare.
 

Latest posts

Top