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Real Animal Traceback in Just Seconds

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PORKER

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ScoringAg's Web-based Livestock Databank Gives Animal Traceback in Just Seconds
Just entering an animal's ear tag number into ScoringAg's Web-based databank can give immediate access to public source data for the animal in real time.

(PRWEB) October 22, 2005 -- With the Public Records "Search" function found on the www.ScoringAg.com Home page, reading (RFID tag), scanning (barcode tag), or entering (manually) the animal's ear tag number into the search page's entry block gives the user access to the public information for the animal: such as, breed, other ID tag data, name, date of birth, sex, brand, tattoo, color, and dam / sire names.

In addition, the animal's traceback history from origin to the present is displayed by unique premises ID (PIDC), activity name, and activity date / time. The expanded details of the animal's history are accessible only by the animal and Web page owner, available only by entering the owner's login and password.

The public information page for the animal can be found with ScoringAg's search function in two other ways: by entering the unique ScoringAg number for the animal (SSI-EID); and by entering the premises ID (PIDC) for the location where the animal is found.

For an example of how quickly and easily ScoringAg's instant public access system works, go to the www.ScoringAg.com Home page and enter the following numbers in the appropriate blocks in the "Search" drop-down menu:

RFID 804000000045821

SSI-EID 030053744

PIDC 011M13N47222310MW0874409+000

Instead of waiting for hours or days, ScoringAg system is able to deliver this level of public information in a matter of seconds -- like no other system. The Public Records pages also show a photo of the animal, giving an additional means of animal ID when ear tags are lost or stolen, and only unique identifying characteristics can give positive ID for the animal.

Earlier this year, at the ID INFO EXPO 2005 held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel at Chicago-O'Hare, September 26–29, 2005, ScoringSystem demonstrated this unique feature of ScoringAg's Web-based agriculture databank, showing booth visitors how Public Records could be accessed instantly by scanning RFID ear tags into the "Public Search" function. Using RFID readers, such as the Idology wireless LightningROD Reader and AVID's PowerTracker V, field data was collected by reading RIFD ear tag numbers. Then, by transferring the data to the ScoringAg Public Search via Bluetooth or RS-232, the animal's public source data was available immediately, in real time, as it is retrieved on-line from ScoringAg's Web-based databank.

Another exclusive feature of ScoringAg's Web-based system is animal and location premises ID data entry using 2D DataMatrix barcode labels and the Nokia 6610 cell phone with Semacode programming. This unique cell phone application allows users to access ScoringAg Web pages by scanning DataMatrix barcoded labels in the field using 2D DataMatrix labels for a variety of product and location identification labeling.

ScoringAg.com and its traceback and traceup system for agriculture products, featuring Site-Specific Recordkeeping™ and PIDC location code, is one of the many divisions of ScoringSystem, Inc. Located in Sarasota, Florida USA , the company specializes in providing solutions with mobile data, via wireless PDAs, laptops, and Semacode-programmed Nokia, Siemens, and Sony Ericsson cell phones. Whether using RFID or barcodes for traceup and traceback of livestock, from birth through the packing plants and on to the consumer; or tracking transport containers or perishable meats and other food consumer goods, www.ScoringAg.com makes managing data easier -- and does it in an extremely cost effective manner from "Field-to-Fork."
 

STAFF

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Hello Porker, this data has been forwarded The current crisis began when influenza from wild ducks and geese jumped to Chinese chickens and domestic ducks in 1997. This has happened in the past with sometimes 100 percent mortality among infected poultry, but it was generally believed that avian influenzas could only be transmitted to humans through reassortment in pigs’ guts. Pigs or swine can easily contract both bird and human strains of influenza and are believed to be the ideal “viral blenders” for creating pandemic strains. Not good

This time, however, an avian subtype jumped directly to a small number of humans. This shocked and terrified researchers, since a thoroughly “wild” avian strain is initially invisible to our immune systems.
Our response is this press release of a couple days ago ;

ScoringAg's Location Records Ready To Fight Spread Of Avian Flu

ScoringAg's Web-based Location Records can pinpoint avian flu outbreaks and give communicable disease experts critical, accurate, and reliable on-site data in real time for immediate response.

(PRWEB) October 14, 2005 -- Latest news reports have expressed growing concern about the possibility of a global human influenza pandemic related to the spread of avian influenza. In response to this potential catastrophe, the UN's World Health Organization (WHO) has appointed a worldwide team of experts in communicable diseases to lead the fight.

ScoringSystem, Inc. stands ready to place its Web-based response system at the service of the WHO and other communicable disease experts worldwide in preparing for the potentially catastrophic spread of avian flu and its human counterpart. ScoringAg.com, a division of ScoringSystem, recently announced the development of a new secure rapid response communications system that utilizes a unique application of the Location Records feature of ScoringAg's secure Web-based database.

Having a Web-based emergency response system is an essential tool in reporting critical disease outbreaks rapidly and accurately, such as that anticipated by the expected global spread of avian flu. ScoringAg's effective rapid response system focuses attention on emergencies early enough to identify the exact critical nature and progress in the spread of the disease, and speed necessary services to the site.

Quick responses can minimize or even eliminate the large loss of life that is often associated with the usual inaccurate, inadequate, and late response experienced when an emergency response system is not in place and ready to be used by those most needed -- the first responders and direct aid administrators.

ScoringAg's rapid response system enables public health and medical officials to track emergency situation data in real time with precise location information provided by ScoringSystem's PIDC worldwide premises code. The data available include up-to-date photos, video, and inspection records -- all on the Web site's Location Records pages for all responders and experts to review and comment. ScoringSystem's Site-Specific Recordkeeping™ Web-based central server provides a single "clearinghouse" with record pages for rapidly reporting and collaborating on critical information by emergency response groups and others around the world.

Without ScoringSystem's unique central server and Web-based system there is often no way to share collective knowledge about an emergency, whether a disease outbreak like avian flu or the intentional spread of disease by bio-terrorism. Even if officials are somehow all aware of the situation by other means, if there is no central system it can be a matter of days or weeks until all the facts are known to everyone and their reviews and valuable inputs are collected and summarized. By then it is usually much to late.

With ScoringAg's Location Records Web pages every public health and medical official can document the situation with Web-based records in real time, adding pictures and video to supplement the details of the record. Then, all emergency response team personnel can review emergency report data, photos, and video of the situation in real time, directly from the on-site report. Other offline databases and local software systems that may be used for collecting and storing information on avian flu outbreaks are scattered around the world and are usually unable to communicate with each other or exchange information to show the complete situation.

The ScoringSystem emergency response system uses a 2D DataMatrix barcode label that can be printed onsite, so that Nokia, Sendo, Siemans, Sony Ericsson, and other cell phones (using Semacode imaging software) can decode the barcode and go directly to ScoringSystem's database and emergency Location Records Web page in real time. With Site-Specific Recordkeeping™ the event can be shared anywhere, while ScoringSystem's 128-bit encrypted databank maintains security under control of the appropriate agencies responsible for coordinating the global response to the emergency.

Since it is Web-based, ScoringSystem's system can be deployed to every country in the world, enabling experts to exchange information in various languages as needed, and running in Unicode with the ability to handle all keyboard language setups. The system enables all international groups to move at a moments notice to take action in the field immediately when the emergency occurs. Local, state, federal, and international officials and infrastructures can be connected and stay coordinated with all involved agencies.

Many other types of emergencies and events also can be handled by ScoringAg's Web-based response system and Location Record pages; such as, tracking every specific outbreak of disease and agri-terrorism at specific sites in one worldwide database. These unique Web-based Location Records are able to report and manage responses on animal and plant disease outbreaks around the world in just seconds. Outbreaks, such as FMD (foot and mouth disease), BSE ("mad cow disease"), screw worm fly, and many other animal and plant diseases -- including the effects from all bacterial, fungal, viral, phytoplasmal, nematode, and parasitic infestations - are too expensive and burdensome on the world economy when sick animals or plants enter the global food chain. Recalls of suspected contaminated agricultural products are expensive not only for companies involved, but also for entire global economic community.

ScoringAg.com and its traceback and traceup system for agriculture products, featuring Site-Specific Recordkeeping™ and PIDC location code, is one of the many divisions of ScoringSystem, Inc. Located in Sarasota, Florida USA, the company specializes in providing solutions with mobile data, via wireless PDAs, laptops, and Semacode-programmed Nokia mobile phones. Whether using RFID or barcodes for tracking and traceback of livestock or perishable commodities and other consumer goods, www.ScoringAg.com makes managing data easier -- and does it in an extremely cost effective manner.
 

PORKER

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The ScoringSystem emergency response system uses a 2D DataMatrix barcode label that can be printed onsite, so that Nokia, Sendo, Siemans, Sony Ericsson, and other cell phones (using Semacode imaging software) can decode the barcode and go directly to ScoringSystem's database and emergency Location Records Web page in real time.

Say there STAFF ,could you post those new phone models?
 

STAFF

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Here is the site for the phones .
http://www.scoringsystem.com/sales/images/smartphones_us.pdf One thing you have to remember is that, you cannot stop progress even in technology. As we are a developement partner of the phone industry even RFID tag reading phones will be avaiable in the future.
 

Econ101

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Hey, Staff and Porker, How much would these systems cost? Could you bring down the cost of MCOOL from what the NCBA and the Packers and food handlers say it will cost to know where our food comes from? How come I know where my grapes come from but can't trace my higher costing steak?
 

STAFF

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The cost of our system is so cheap that it is the only system that runs in the third world to move food and feed.By the way Porker is a sales rep. in Northern Michigan.
Could you bring down the cost of MCOOL from what the NCBA and the Packers and food handlers say it will cost to know where our food comes from?Answer;The system displays the data for COOL at No Cost.We are working with the species groups to do just that for the national Id system as to keep it non- profit.
How come I know where my grapes come from but can't trace my higher costing steak?Answer; If you look at the grapes package you will notice a little SSI logo which all producers use.Same thing can be done for every breed of livestock and field of produce here in the US. with what we call micro-branding.
 

Econ101

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STAFF said:
The cost of our system is so cheap that it is the only system that runs in the third world to move food and feed.By the way Porker is a sales rep. in Northern Michigan.
Could you bring down the cost of MCOOL from what the NCBA and the Packers and food handlers say it will cost to know where our food comes from?Answer;The system displays the data for COOL at No Cost.We are working with the species groups to do just that for the national Id system as to keep it non- profit.
How come I know where my grapes come from but can't trace my higher costing steak?Answer; If you look at the grapes package you will notice a little SSI logo which all producers use.Same thing can be done for every breed of livestock and field of produce here in the US. with what we call micro-branding.

Thanks, Staff. I just wanted to hear it again that the arguments against MCOOL were just plain wrong from someone who knows instead of some paid off politician.

By the way, you Canadians, if this system was implemented, I would buy my beef from rkaiser's future plant or some other non-concentrated market participant as well as USA beef. Make sure enough info. gets into MCOOL so we can tell the difference between the quality and quantity packers.
 

PORKER

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I found this write -up why COOL and MID are one and the SAME.
“If we get more cows with BSE and
can’t really track them in a timely
fashion, we’re going to have a lot of
egg on our face,” says Kevin Kirk,
special assistant to the director of the
animal-industry division of the Michigan
Department of Agriculture.
A national animal-ID system
offers multiple direct and indirect
benefits of disease management.
Although primarily designed to trace
foreign and domestic animal diseases,
the system would also favorably impact
both foreign and domestic
confidence. Maintaining markets, or
regaining lost markets, is one of the
biggest benefits of an ID system, Kirk
says. “There will be a day when the
food distributors of the world, such
as McDonald’s or Wal-Mart, are going
to say, ‘If you can’t track them back
to the farm, we don’t want your
meat,’” Kirk says. “Yes, animal ID is
focusing on disease control, but it’s
also market protection.”
As other countries continue to
strengthen their animal-ID systems,
traceability in the U.S. will be vital to
maintain and grow export markets.
Australia’s reliance on exports has led
to strong and continuing support of
a national ID system, says Rick Beasley,
operations manager of Meat and
Livestock Australia’s National Livestock
Identification System. “We
have been fortunate that we have
had good buy-in from all sectors of
industry from the start,” he says.
“We all know that loss of markets
would spell disaster to all sectors of
the industry.”
Global Animal
Management Inc. found that consumers,
who already perceive the
nation’s meat supply as safe, would
be even more confident with the
implementation of the NAIS.

The benefits beyond disease control
are extensive, including everything
from verification of age, source,
process and breed to enhanced management
tools and broad vertical
data-sharing models.
Australian producers, who have
been phasing in a national animal-ID
system since 1999, now use sophisticated
on-farm software to collect
data to enhance on-property management,

Beasley says. “In addition,
carcass-feedback information can be
provided by packers in electronic
form and matched to the same electronic
number on an individual-body
basis. This then provides a very powerful
herd-management package.”
strengthen their animal-ID systems,an
traceability in the U.S. will be vital to
maintain and grow export markets.
Australia’s reliance on exports has led
to strong and continuing support of
a national ID system, says Rick Beasley,
operations manager of Meat and
Livestock Australia’s National Livestock
Identification System. “We
have been fortunate that we have
had good buy-in from all sectors of
industry from the start,” he says.
“We all know that loss of markets
would spell disaster to all sectors of
the industry.”

The dairy industry is already taking
advantage of additional benefits,
employing animal ID to identify offspring,
with the associated production
data used in genetic-evaluation programs,
says Robert Fourdraine, chief
operating officer of the Wisconsin
Livestock ID Consortium. On a recent
trip to Australia to observe the effectiveness
of its animal-ID system,
Fourdraine visited a 400-cow dairy
that used radio-frequency ID tags
not only for the national ID program,
but also in the rotary milking parlor
to collect individual milk weights.
The RFID tags were also used with
the automatic sort gates for animals
leaving the parlor, directing them
back to their pens or to a treatment
area, depending on their needs.
E-6 Calf Ranch, a 10,000-head
dairy calf ranch in Gill, Colo., also
uses RFID tags and has recently added
retinal scans for records management
and source verification for its
dairy beef. The ranch can’t afford the
risk of being quarantined, says Kirt
Espenson, owner of E-6, so he started
using RFID for better recordkeeping,
as well as calf management.
The animal-agriculture industry
needs to think in terms of elective
and mandatory when it comes to
animal ID, says Jim Heinle, president
of Global Animal Management, a
subsidiary of Schering-Plough Animal
Health Corp. To gain additional benefits,
producers will need to adopt
a more comprehensive datamanagement
plan than the NAIS
calls for. Mandatory identification —
communicating the animal identifier,
date, premises and event code to a
confidential national registry — will
be relatively straightforward and uncomplicated,
Heinle says, but elective.
What can we learn from other
countries’ animal-ID programs?
Although the U.S. animal-ID system is more comprehensive
and large-scale than most other countries’ systems, the United States can
learn from the mistakes and successes of their efforts. By observing numerous systems
around the world, Glenn Fischer, senior vice president of Allflex USA Inc.,
points out several key success factors for ID programs:
■ Thoughtful selection of foundation technology
■ Infrastructure for harvesting ID in high-volume locations
■ Secure, “closed loop” distribution logistics
■ Proactive role of distribution/reseller network
■ Governmental and industry leadership/financial support
■ Strong communications to all stakeholders
“Following these elements, there are many successes in animal-ID implementation
across the globe,” Fischer says. “Based on the needs of our market, our job
is to observe and learn from each, take the best and most applicable elements
that are relevant to our market, and move forward with the implantation of our
national ID system.”
Rick Beasley, operations manager of Meat and Livestock Australia’s National
Livestock Identification System, says that the similarity of problems with both
countries’ systems is striking. “The issue is about scalability — the problems are
the same,” he says. Beasley points out that the U.S. industry is also more litigious
and less apt to share information than the Australian industry.
services will encompass more technology
and market participation.
With technology and animal-ID
infrastructure in place, certain industry
groups and retailers may seize the
opportunity to take animal ID to
the next level, bringing source-, age and
process-verified products to the
consumer or COOL. While in Australia, Fourdraine
witnessed an example of this
when a processor and retailer piggybacked
onto the animal-ID program
to provide full meat traceability to the consumer.
 

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