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Response from NCBA

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Bill

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A common sense response from the US cattle industry regarding the latest Canadian positive.

NCBA Statement regarding BSE Case Detected in Alberta, Canada
Terry Stokes, Chief Executive Officer
National Cattlemen's Beef Association - Centennial, Colorado

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) today confirmed bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in an approximately six-year-old cross-bred cow born and raised in Alberta. No part of the animal entered the human food or animal feed systems.

"The bottom line for our consumers -- in the United States and around the world -- remains the same: U.S. beef is safe. The world's leading scientists, medical professionals and government officials agree that BSE is not a public or animal health risk in the United States.

"While this is unfortunate news, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) does not expect this case to affect the beef trade status between the United States and Canada or other countries. We believe the United States should continue to engage in trade that is consistent with the international standards outlined by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and we expect countries that trade with us to do the same.

"The United States accepts beef and cattle from Canada that is under 30 months of age, which is an internationally recognized age marker for safety because BSE is a disease found in older cattle. The cow confirmed in Canada today was 69 months old, according to the CFIA.

"As beef producers, we take the matter of beef safety and trade protocol very seriously. We expect a full accounting of the situation following a complete investigation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and CFIA.

"As America's beef producers, our number-one priority has always been providing the safest beef in the world. Our livelihood depends on it, and NCBA has worked with the government and top scientists for more than 15 years to build, maintain and expand the safeguards that today are protecting consumers and our cattle from BSE."
 

Bill

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Statement by Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns Regarding BSE Finding in Canada


January 23, 2006

"I appreciated the opportunity to speak with Canadian Agriculture Minister Andy Mitchell today, who apprised me of the new BSE detection in Canada. I assured him that based on the information he supplied, I anticipate no change in the status of beef or live cattle imports to the U.S. from Canada under our established agreement. As I've said many times, our beef trade decisions follow internationally accepted guidelines that are based in science.

"We will continue to evaluate this situation as the investigation continues. I have directed our USDA team to work with Canada and its investigative team. Minister Mitchell has pledged his full cooperation.

"I am confident in the safety of beef and in the safeguards we and our approved beef trading partners have in place to protect our food supply. We will continue to adhere to international guidelines in our relationships with all trading partners, and my hope continues to be that we achieve a system of science-based global beef trade."
 

Sandhusker

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Bill said:
A common sense response from the US cattle industry regarding the latest Canadian positive.

NCBA Statement regarding BSE Case Detected in Alberta, Canada
Terry Stokes, Chief Executive Officer
National Cattlemen's Beef Association - Centennial, Colorado

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) today confirmed bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in an approximately six-year-old cross-bred cow born and raised in Alberta. No part of the animal entered the human food or animal feed systems.

"The bottom line for our consumers -- in the United States and around the world -- remains the same: U.S. beef is safe. The world's leading scientists, medical professionals and government officials agree that BSE is not a public or animal health risk in the United States.

"While this is unfortunate news, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) does not expect this case to affect the beef trade status between the United States and Canada or other countries. We believe the United States should continue to engage in trade that is consistent with the international standards outlined by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and we expect countries that trade with us to do the same.

"The United States accepts beef and cattle from Canada that is under 30 months of age, which is an internationally recognized age marker for safety because BSE is a disease found in older cattle. The cow confirmed in Canada today was 69 months old, according to the CFIA.

"As beef producers, we take the matter of beef safety and trade protocol very seriously. We expect a full accounting of the situation following a complete investigation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and CFIA.

"As America's beef producers, our number-one priority has always been providing the safest beef in the world. Our livelihood depends on it, and NCBA has worked with the government and top scientists for more than 15 years to build, maintain and expand the safeguards that today are protecting consumers and our cattle from BSE."

Someone needs to give Terry a newspaper. Our safeguards have not been maintained and expanded, they've been lowered.
 

feeder

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Does anyone recall what NCBA views are in regard to importing OTM?
 
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