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Rumensin 80

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David Patrick

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Hello, I am new to the forum and am way down in the sunny south. My father-in-law and I run about 50 head of commercial cows. I am wondering if anyone has any experience with Rumensin. Are there any side effects of giving it to younger heifers or calves? I have been warned before about urea in feed for calves and it seems like Rumensin might do the same thing. Any help is appreciated.
 

Turkey Track Bar

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David Patrick said:
Hello, I am new to the forum and am way down in the sunny south. My father-in-law and I run about 50 head of commercial cows. I am wondering if anyone has any experience with Rumensin. Are there any side effects of giving it to younger heifers or calves? I have been warned before about urea in feed for calves and it seems like Rumensin might do the same thing. Any help is appreciated.

David:

First welcome to the board!!!

Second, Rumensin and urea are totally different!!!

Rumensin is a medicated feed or feed additive. It is typically used as a preventive for coccidosis and as product to improve feed efficiency and prevent digestive upsets in cattle. Because of it's active ingredient monesin, you want to be sure horses can't consume it because monesin comsumption has been proven to be fatal in horses.

Rumensin is an excellent product...have you looked at their website and product label??? If not, I encourage you to check them out...I've pasted links to each respectively.

http://www.elanco.us/species/beef/feedlot/products/rumensin.htm

http://www.elanco.us/products/pdfs/rumensin/rumensin_80_label_22dec05.pdf

Urea on the other hand is a protein source (and fertilizer)...as a matter of fact it contains a high level of protein, but as I'm sure you know can be deadly to cattle if misfed (which is very easy to do) and is almost always deadly to horses...

If you do nothing else, read the Rumensin label...it should help you determine if it is a product you should use. The "reading the label" principle holds true for most animal husbandry products...feeds, animal health products, etc. The label should always be read before the product is used.

Hope this helps!!

Cheers---

TTB :wink:

An edit David: I don't know what you want Rumensin to do for you...but you need to read the label to determine if it is approved for use in the age of cattle you want to use it on, and if it is approved for use for the reason you want to use it (for example it is approved as a coccidiostat (preventer of coccidia))....And, another thought...for the number of cattle you have, it might be easier if you buy it pre mixed in a feed.
 

Faster horses

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Good advice from both posters above me.

One thing about rumensin as a preventive for coccidiosis, enough must be consumed to prevent it. You just can't put it out and think you have your bases covered. They must eat a certain amount per head per day.

And you have to introduce rumensin slowly or cattle will back off it and refuse to eat it.

It is a great product, but read the label as Turkey Track Bar suggested. And do be careful where you store it or any feed containing it.
 

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