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Sale Barns Oppose Private Animal ID

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HAY MAKER

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Sale Barns Oppose Private Animal ID

-Livestock Marketing Association Says Federal Money, Help Needed



By Chris Clayton

DTN Staff Reporter

November 8, 2005



HERSHEY, Penn. (DTN) -- Reflecting the division in the livestock industry over the USDA's national animal-tracking plan, a trade association representing sale barns made it clear Monday that livestock auctions won't take part in a privatized animal tracking system.



The Livestock Marketing Association, which represents over 600 livestock auction sale barns, made it clear that without money and federal help to create a national animal identification program, the LMA's members will not participate voluntarily. While the group does not have figures on the number of cattle handled by its members, nationally the majority of feeder cattle sold do move through sale barns.



"No dollars, no help, we don't come to the table," said Nancy Robinson, the LMA's vice president of government relations. "Because, let's face it, our position is we understood this would be a public database."



Robinson's comments came Monday night at the U.S. Animal Health Association annual meeting in a forum held by the veterinary group's Animal Identification Committee. Chairman of the committee, Bob Hillman, executive director of the Texas Animal Health Commission, called the night meeting searching for some consensus for the livestock industry to move ahead with an identification program.



"All of us recognize not everybody is on the same page from the standpoint of having a private database," Hillman said.



Groups within the livestock industry have been at odds with each other and the U.S. Department of Agriculture since Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns announced in August that he wants a private group to create and operate the database that would track livestock sales and movements nationally.



Some in the livestock industry are looking for the USAHA to take a strong position on animal identification before its meeting ends Wednesday. Several resolutions are up for debate by the group's Animal Identification Committee.



Because no ruling has come from the federal government setting a mandate for producers to enroll in the national identification program, the livestock industry runs the risk of having a partial database including only a portion of the nation's livestock "and it won't work worth a flip," Hillman said.



While Johanns wants a private system built without federal funds, the USDA's chief veterinarian, John Clifford, acknowledged Monday the agency has a centralized tracking database that was used as a prototype for a tracking program being implemented in Wisconsin. Clifford said he is restricted from using the tracking system USDA was creating. He said it would take more development to have it ready to use nationally.



"We could get that system out relatively quickly," Clifford said. "But, having said that, I'm not going put that system out there, not unless I'm given instructions to do so."



As efforts for a national private system stall, at least eight states now have mandated or are in the process of mandating that producers register their home addresses or "premise ID." Nationally, only about 125,000 premises are registered out of an estimated possible 2.1 million livestock owners, according to a USDA agriculture census. Wisconsin, which mandated premise registration Nov. 1, leads the nation with about 26,000 producers registered.



Clifford said he also is aware of as many as 15 states moving forward with their own plans for animal tracking programs as well.



The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.



"I think you can imagine how instrumental we will be for that data collection and transfer and that traceback program," Robinson said. "For us to come to the table and sit down and have to agree to a private consortium to establish a database ... I don't think you can expect us at that table."



While some groups are choosing not to go along, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association continues working on its own database. NCBA officials have said the system could be ready to register livestock by early 2006.



David Thain, state veterinarian for Nevada, said the national association representing state veterinarians has determined USDA should have a memorandum of understanding with a private consortium by July 1, 2006, or reconsider the private approach.



"Personally, I don't care where the data is at as long as (state veterinarians) have access," Thain said.



Sam Holland, South Dakota's state veterinarian, said producers in his state would be pretty happy if a private program was put on hold, but Holland said producers would support a system run by state and federal animal-health authorities.



Another state veterinarian, Becky Brewer-Walker of Oklahoma, said several people have complained about the cost to set up a program, but she asked what could happen if a disease hit without a tracking program in place.



"We have to look at everything but one thing we have to look at is the cost of not having an ID system," Brewer-Walker said.
 

STAFF

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The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.

Gee,Mrs.Robinson, we don't have any software to buy or to install,computers enter data automatically,and everyone pays the same$0.0025 of a cent per animal at the stockyards with www.scoringag.com .
 
A

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STAFF said:
The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.

Gee,Mrs.Robinson, we don't have any software to buy or to install,computers enter data automatically,and everyone pays the same$0.0025 of a cent per animal at the stockyards with www.scoringag.com .


You mean with your system, you do not need RFID tag readers-- or computers and personell to input the new owner and/or destination of these animals.... :???: Tell me more about this "magic" system....
 

STAFF

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The ScoringAg system is Web - Based cause we don't have any software to buy or to install,and once the data including brands is entered its and/or destination of these animals.... is Automated
 

PORKER

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Couldn't have said it better unless it was free and in this time NOTHING is FREE,unless it a two for one sale at Walmart.
 

PORKER

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Sam Holland, South Dakota's state veterinarian, said producers in his state would be pretty happy if a private program was put on hold, but Holland said producers would support a system run by state and federal animal-health authorities.

Protecting his government .

Another state veterinarian, Becky Brewer-Walker of Oklahoma, said several people have complained about the cost to set up a program, but she asked what could happen if a disease hit without a tracking program in place.

Makes you wonder who,s system their looking at? Only one That is running for all species and cheap enough for the third world is ScoringAg.Of course some of our ranchers and packers think they live in the third world.
 

Murgen

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The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.

I would say that every industry (cattle, beef) should be self-sustaining. Let them (consumer) pay for the security that they demand!

Are they demanding the assurances? If not, then let the industry pay for it through what we will lose, if we don't!!!!!

Sometimes we neglect to take into account lost sales and margin if we don't meet consumer concerns!
 

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Hay There Porker ,where might this be? Of course some of our ranchers and packers think they live in the third world.
 

mrj

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Predictably, Nancy Robinson makes it quite clear LMA won't willingly be involved in M-ID unless there is money in it for their members.

Dr. Holland should understand that not all cattle producers in SD agree with his position.

SD Cattlemens' Assoc. has supported a private system for animal ID for several years. Members of NCBA have directed leadership of that organization to develop a private system which would protect producer information from Freedom Of Information Act, control costs (does the government do anything more efficiently than private enterprise does?), and to provide a system which could also be utilized for production data management.

These all are issues SD Cattlemen has said are important, and has submitted comments stating so, as well as supporting NCBA's leadership in moving forward on Animal ID.

It's difficult to understand Dr. Holland thinking that "those producers" would embrace a government run system as they recently took him to the woodshed in a press release from SD Stockgrowers urging their members not to register their premises with the Animal Industry Board (which Dr. Holland administers) because they didn't suppport a private national database to track animal movements. Doing so would, in their minds, show support for the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) which USDA announced will utilize a private group to build the database.

BTW, In case anyone has forgotten, or not heard, after getting it up and running, NCBA plans to hand off management of this database to a non-profit consortium of animal species/groups. NCBA will not profit by one thin dime.

MRJ
 

Econ101

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Murgen said:
The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.

I would say that every industry (cattle, beef) should be self-sustaining. Let them (consumer) pay for the security that they demand!

Are they demanding the assurances? If not, then let the industry pay for it through what we will lose, if we don't!!!!!

Sometimes we neglect to take into account lost sales and margin if we don't meet consumer concerns!

Murgen, I completely agree with you. That is exactly why I question govt. subsidies of industry of any kind. Too often here in the U.S. the people carry the burden of guarenteeing large corporation's misteps. Canadian producers in the BSE boondogle(untold lost farms and or equity), Canadian taxpyers in the Tyson and Cargill bailout(49+ 11 million in the least), Mississippi taxpayers in Haley Barbour's (sp?) meat packing plant (67 million), TN taxpayers in the Nissan move from LA to Nashville (200 million), and the list goes on and on. Pretty soon you are talking about real money, eh MRJ. How much hamburger will that buy for the average hard working plant stiff at Lakeside, Tam?

This influence of industry in our societies is draining our resources. Why, so some corp. exec can buy more luxury goods and act impressive to people that sort of stuff impresses (politicians)? If you are a real Christian instead of a hypocrite, people like Jim James are more impressive than they.

I am not against every govt. intervention, but it should be held for those who have not wielded the carving knife on the economy.

I have my suspicions about this id program as it will give packers huge information on the supply of beef with which they can potentially use to manipulate the prices to producers more easily.
 

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"USDA has spent many hours and a lot of money developing an animal tracking database. Then, without seeking needed input from all sectors of the livestock and poultry industry, USDA scrapped the original plan and now wants the database to be kept by a private entity."

Reason is it would not track anything and keep it straight.The system had huge daily costs just to keep it running and had security holes that no engineer could plug.
 

mrj

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Econ101 said:
Murgen said:
The industry should not be forced to pay for the full cost of the animal identification program, Robinson said, with her view supported by other speakers as well. That would put a heavy burden on livestock sale barns and similar businesses that would have to install software, sensors and enter data into computers for the volume of transactions they oversee.

I would say that every industry (cattle, beef) should be self-sustaining. Let them (consumer) pay for the security that they demand!

Are they demanding the assurances? If not, then let the industry pay for it through what we will lose, if we don't!!!!!

Sometimes we neglect to take into account lost sales and margin if we don't meet consumer concerns!

Murgen, I completely agree with you. That is exactly why I question govt. subsidies of industry of any kind. Too often here in the U.S. the people carry the burden of guarenteeing large corporation's misteps. Canadian producers in the BSE boondogle(untold lost farms and or equity), Canadian taxpyers in the Tyson and Cargill bailout(49+ 11 million in the least), Mississippi taxpayers in Haley Barbour's (sp?) meat packing plant (67 million), TN taxpayers in the Nissan move from LA to Nashville (200 million), and the list goes on and on. Pretty soon you are talking about real money, eh MRJ. How much hamburger will that buy for the average hard working plant stiff at Lakeside, Tam?

This influence of industry in our societies is draining our resources. Why, so some corp. exec can buy more luxury goods and act impressive to people that sort of stuff impresses (politicians)? If you are a real Christian instead of a hypocrite, people like Jim James are more impressive than they.

I am not against every govt. intervention, but it should be held for those who have not wielded the carving knife on the economy.

I have my suspicions about this id program as it will give packers huge information on the supply of beef with which they can potentially use to manipulate the prices to producers more easily.

Are you sure packers don't already have other sources to get information on the supply of beef?

MRJ
 

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Its either the CME or the Gov. with a few private sites that can provide data.101 says I have my suspicions about this id program as it will give packers huge information on the supply of beef with which they can potentially use to manipulate the prices to producers more easily.We do too.
 

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