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shearing and lambing

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gcreekrch

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Thanks Jody, I see you use the same type lambulance as we do. It still amazes me how tough those little boogers are when they are born.

I like your grafting stantion, I will be constructing one here.
 

RSL

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neat. It brought flashback of before my brother went off to school (interestingly enough it was not long after the sheep must have followed him)...
 

jodywy

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gcreekrch said:
Thanks Jody, I see you use the same type lambulance as we do. It still amazes me how tough those little boogers are when they are born.

I like your grafting stantion, I will be constructing one here.
http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/publist/Leaflets/Sheep/352-12.pdf
tis is close to what we built.
here another idea
http://www.beefextension.com/research_reports/research_56_94/rr78/rr78_28.pdf
 

Red Barn Angus

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Jody, I found your thread very interesting. Way back when I was a kid in high school I had sheep as a FFA project. There had never been sheep on the farm before so it was a real learning experience. My FFA teacher said they were an excellent project for someone with minimal facilities and little money. That fit me pretty well. This was around 1960. You could buy bred ewes locally for around $18 to $19 per head but my teacher strongly recommend western ewes which were raised on large ranches in Texas and cost about $23. They were mostly Colombia and Ranboulette (sp?) and all had open faces. Some faces were white and some were black. I can't remember the price of wool but I do remember you could get $4 to $5 per head from the wool. One time I sold some good fat lambs and the commission company in Kansas City, we didn't have sale barns then, sent me a letter saying I had gotten the extreme top price of $28.50 per hundred. Seemed like a lot of money to a kid over 50 years ago. The sheep did buy my first car and paid for my first three years of college so they were a very good project. I'd be real interested in what the prices are now for lambs and wool. Today in this country there are no sheep and no markets if you did have some. I will always have fond memories of those sheep. They sure did give me a start that I wouldn't have had any other way.
 

jodywy

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SHEEP
DENKE, DON [ PAVILLION WY ] 46 Lamb 103lbs 192.00
GRANT, NANA (RUSTY) [ RIVERTON WY ] 7 Lamb 55lbs 214.00
HAMPTON, ERIN * [ PAVILLION WY ] 3 Lamb 66lbs 207.00
LYNCH, CORINNA* [ RIVERTON WY ]20 Lamb 72lbs 204.00
WHITEMAN, CAMILLE [ RIVERTON WY ]3 Lamb 83lbs 203.00

$200 feeder lambs and $8/lb for super fine clean wool
I only got $1.40 /lb for my course white face wool but that came out better then $14/head
 

jodywy

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Market Summary, Week ending April 29, 2011
The updated Market Summary can be accessed each Monday at www.sheepusa.org/Weekly_Market_Summary or by calling 303-771-3500, ext. 37.
Feeder Prices, San Angelo, new crop 45-70 lbs. for 190-214 $/cwt.
Slaughter Prices - Negotiated, Live, wooled and shorn 125-180 lbs. for 165.59-210 $/cwt.(wtd. ave. 186.43); dressed, no sales reported.
Slaughter Prices - Formula, 3,982 head1 at 276-370 $/cwt. for 78.90 ave. lbs.; 7,567 head at 319.99-375.04 $/cwt. for 90.40 ave. lbs.
Equity Electronic Auction, no sale.
Cutout value/Net carcass value2 $375.13/cwt.
Carcass Price, Choice and Prime, YG 1-4, weighted averages, 406 head at 55-65 lbs. for $391.81/cwt., 795 head at 65-75 lbs. for $361.45/cwt., 2,789 head at 75-85 lbs. for $355.90/cwt., 2,415 head at 85 lbs. and up for $338.36/cwt.
Boxed Lamb, weighted average prices ($/cwt.), Trimmed 4" Loins $502.17, Rack, roast-ready, frenched, $1,685.72, Leg, trotter-off, partial boneless, $631.04, Ground lamb $567.55, Shoulder, square-cut, $324.91.
Imported Boxed Lamb, weighted average prices ($/cwt), AUS Rack (fresh, frenched, cap-off, 20 oz/dn to 28 oz/up) $1,334.98, AUS Rack (frozen, frenched, cap-off, 20-24 oz) $1,183.49, NZ Rack (frozen, frenched, cap-off, (12 oz/dn) $1,221.32, AUS Shoulder (fresh, square-cut) $296.15, AUS Leg (semi boneless, fresh) $514.97.
Exported Adult Sheep, 775 sheep.
Wool, Price ($/pound) Clean, Delivered, No new prices reported. 18 micron (Grade 80s) 7.81, 19 micron (Grade 80s) 6.71, 20 micron (Grade 70s) 5.38-5.55, 21 micron (Grade 64-70s) 5.29, 22 micron (Grade 64s) 4.96-5.14, 23 micron (Grade 62s) 4.73, 24 micron (Grade 60-62s) 4.39, 25 micron (Grade 58s) 3.81, 26 micron (Grade 56-58s) 3.20-3.46, 27 micron (Grade 56s) NA, 28 micron (Grade 54s) NA, 29 micron (Grade 50-54s) NA, 30-34 micron (Grade 44-50s) NA.
Australian Wool, Clean, delivered FOB warehouse & gross producers ($/pound), 18 micron (Grade 80s) 7.40-8.39, 19 micron (Grade 80s) 5.95-6.74, 20 micron (Grade 70s) 5.05-5.72, 21 micron (Grade 64-70s) 4.75-5.38, 22 micron (Grade 64s) 4.67-5.29, 23 micron (Grade 62s) 4.50-5.10, 24 micron (Grade 60-62s) 3.91-3.61, 25 micron (Grade 58s) NA, 26 micron (Grade 56-58s) 3.19-3.61, 27 micron (Grade 56s) NA, 28 micron (Grade 54s) 2.49-2.82, 29 micron (Grade 50-54s) NA, 30-34 micron (Grade 44-50s) 2.26-2.56., Merino Clippings 3.02-3.42
1Prices reported for the two weight categories of the largest volume traded. 2The cutout value is the same as a net carcass value. It is a composite value that sums the value of the respective lamb cuts multiplied by their weights. It is also the gross carcass value less processing and packaging costs.
(Source: USDA/Agricultural Marketing Service)
 

Red Barn Angus

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Wow, thanks for the information. Now there is some real sticker shock! I assume that $200 is per hundredweight and not per head. And $8 per pound for top wool....wow, I guess a few things have changed in 50 years! I know lamb prices are like every thing else but I really had no idea. Thanks for enlightening me. I do remember a few of my ewes had really fine wool and it brought quite a bit more than the normal wool. I went on a tour of a wool buying business one time and got to see them grade a bag of my wool. That was quite interesting.
 

Red Barn Angus

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Jody, thanks for the market information. Sounds like your son did real well. I know my lamb crop paid for the ewes I had first purchased and kept adding to the ewes each year with the lamb crop money. After I left for college my dad figured he had enough work to do so we sold the sheep but they were sure good to me.

One more reason I enjoy this site. I sure enjoyed your pictures and information. Thank you.

Don
 

jodywy

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most figure 5, some of the BLM and Forest service permits figure 7 with todays bigger cows, but thos range ewes are bigger then my ewes.
I always used 5
 

jodywy

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over the years I averaged around 150% weaned. this year we sitting at 190% (never done that well before) but got a few ewes to lamb and got to get the lambs thru the summer.
Some of those big range outfits wean between 90% to 120%(higher end probally shed lamb. but they run big numbers and have alot more predation.
Ther a few small farm flocks around here that will wean close to a 200% lamb crop
 

gcreekrch

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They are quoting .35 to .55 per lb for farm flock wool here. The freight from Williams Lake to Lethbridge Alberta is free. A truck picks up all the area's wool on one pass sometime in June.
I shipped 390 lbs 2 years ago and got a cheque for $157.24, hardly worth the effort of talking Debbie into packing the bags. :(

Lambs are comparable in price.

Thanks for the links Jody.
 

jodywy

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gcreekrch said:
They are quoting .35 to .55 per lb for farm flock wool here. The freight from Williams Lake to Lethbridge Alberta is free. A truck picks up all the area's wool on one pass sometime in June.
I shipped 390 lbs 2 years ago and got a cheque for $157.24, hardly worth the effort of talking Debbie into packing the bags. :(

Lambs are comparable in price.

Thanks for the links Jody.
Notice photo bucket will not let me show a top view of a ewe in a Stanchion but I can show front and side pics.
 

gcreekrch

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jodywy said:
gcreekrch said:
They are quoting .35 to .55 per lb for farm flock wool here. The freight from Williams Lake to Lethbridge Alberta is free. A truck picks up all the area's wool on one pass sometime in June.
I shipped 390 lbs 2 years ago and got a cheque for $157.24, hardly worth the effort of talking Debbie into packing the bags. :(

Lambs are comparable in price.

Thanks for the links Jody.
Notice photo bucket will not let me show a top view of a ewe in a Stanchion but I can show front and side pics.


Likely thinking someone might get excited one way or another. :roll:
 

Kato

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I've been toying with the sheep idea for a while, especially since I got myself a spinning wheel. After all, I already have guard donkeys to spare. :wink:

What's been holding me back is the fence issue. What kind of fences work best? Is it possible to use electric? Or just bite the bullet and go with sheep wire?
 

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