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stopgap failure

Lonecowboy

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On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives rejected a stopgap spending bill that would have funded the federal government through mid-November while also providing $3.7 billion for disaster relief. Conservative House members rejected the bill in a shocking 230 to 195 defeat.

While Democrats rejected the bill because of the spending cuts to a government loan program to help car companies build fuel-efficient vehicles, conservatives in the GOP felt that the bill in fact cut too little and spent too much.

The failed stopgap bill would have funded the federal government through November 18, permitting lawmakers yet more time to reach an agreement for the 2012 budget year.

GOP leadership in the House forged ahead with the vote on Wednesday, uncertain of the outcome. When it became clear during the roll call vote that the bill would fail, Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy approached three leading Republican conservatives in the chamber in the hopes of convincing them to switch their votes in support of the measure. However, Republican Study Committee Chairman Jim Jordan (pictured above) of Ohio, Joe Walsh of Illinois, and Jason Chaffetz of Utah all remained unmoved.

Two more House Republicans who were absent would likely have voted against the bill, given their history for fiscal conservatism.. Both GOP presidential hopefuls, Texas Congressman Ron Paul and Minnesota Representative Michele Bachmann, missed the vote on Wednesday in order to take part in presidential campaign-related activities.

:D Paul, in particular, has been an adamant opponent of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), asserting that federal disaster relief is “bad economics, bad morality, and bad constitutional law.” It is very unlikely he would have voted in favor of a bill to assign even more money to an agency which he contends is a great contributor to deficit financing.

Congressional Quarterly remarked on the significance of the outcome: “The decisive outcome, a 195-230 rejection of the measure, delivered a stunning and painful message. After nearly nine months in the majority, House GOP leaders still cannot count on their conference to work effectively as a unit.” Particularly telling is that House Speaker John Boehner proved unable to sway even members of his own state delegation, as three other Ohio Republicans — Jim Jordan, Steve Austria, and Michael Turner — voted against the measure as well.

Majority Whip McCarthy did manage to convince Dan Burton of Indiana to support the bill, but when it became clear that the bill would fail, Burton switched back to a negative vote.

As a result of the bill’s failure to pass, Congressional leaders must start over and formulate a measure that will prevent the government from shutting down at the end of next week, and also keep the government’s disaster relief program from running out of money early next week.

Fox News reports:

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has only a few days' worth of aid remaining in its disaster relief fund, lawmakers said Wednesday. The agency has already held up thousands of longer-term rebuilding projects — repairs to sewer systems, parks, roads and bridges, for example — to conserve money to provide emergency relief to victims of recent disasters.

If House Republicans do not yield on disaster relief funding, the bill will likely face confrontation in the Senate, which could force a government shutdown at the end of the week. As it stands now, however, the bill does not have a chance of passing in the House without additional spending cuts.

Republicans should be familiar with this territory, however, as they found themselves in a similar predicament in July. Congressional Quarterly writes:

Facing a similar choice in late July, when conservatives balked at his debt limit proposal, Boehner bowed to GOP conservatives, although their demand for congressional endorsement of a balanced-budget constitutional amendment appeared to be a non-starter with Democrats. The House passed a new version of Boehner’s bill, but the debt limit and deficit reduction stalemate was settled — and default averted — through negotiations with the White House.

However, this particular instance may prove to be more difficult for the House Speaker. During past votes, the loss of support among fiscal conservatives was balanced by a gain in support from House Democrats, as in the case of the debt ceiling vote. With this bill, however, House Democrats were not inclined to support the bill because it included disaster aid.
 

hypocritexposer

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Sun, Jul. 31 2011

“The leaders of both parties, in both chambers, have reached an agreement that will reduce the deficit and avoid default,” announced President Obama Sunday night.

The agreement would cut $1 trillion from a 10-year budget, and would raise the debt ceiling enough to get past the 2012 elections. There would be a second round of deficit reduction that would come from a bipartisan committee of 12 senators and congresspersons.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/debt-ceiling-agreement-reached-says-obama-53139/
 

Lonecowboy

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Do you think ot and flounder and all the other liberals will now accuse reid and the dems of being obstructionists for not hurrying to pass this bill? reid and the dems are holding America hostage and trying to blackmail for more spending$$$----- come on guys reid is trying to single handedly shut down FEMA :D

With the economy sputtering, the warring factions of Congress have lurched toward gridlock over the usually noncontroversial process of approving disaster aid and keeping the government from shutting down.

The GOP-dominated House early Friday muscled through a $3.7 billion disaster aid measure along with a stopgap spending bill to keep the government running past next Friday. The narrow 219-203 tally reversed an embarrassing loss for House GOP leaders that came Wednesday at the hands of rebellious tea party Republicans.

Even before the House vote, however, the leader of the Senate promised that majority Democrats will scuttle the measure as soon as it reaches the chamber on Friday. Democrats there want a much larger infusion of disaster aid and they're angry over cuts totaling $1.6 trillion from clean energy programs -- and the strong-arm tactics being tried by the House.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said the House plan "is not an honest effort at compromise. ... It will be rejected by the Senate."
The combination of events promises to push the partisan war into the weekend and could increase the chances that the government's main disaster aid account at the Federal Emergency Management Agency might run dry early next week.

More broadly, the renewed partisanship over what should be routine moves to help disaster victims and prevent a government shutdown sends a discouraging sign as a bitterly divided Washington looks ahead to more significant debates on President Barack Obama's jobs plan and efforts by a congressional supercommittee to slash deficits.

Thursday's maneuvering started as Republicans controlling the House moved to resurrect the disaster aid package after an embarrassing loss on Wednesday.

Instead of reaching out to Democrats, House GOP leaders looked to persuade wayward tea party Republicans to change their votes and help approve the assistance -- and try to force Senate Democrats into a corner with little choice but to accept cuts to clean energy programs they favor. One sweetener for conservatives was to add $100 million in savings from a program that financed a federal loan to the now-bankrupt solar panel maker Solyndra Inc.
Republicans had hoped that once the House passed the measure, Senate Democrats would have had little choice but to accept it, especially with lawmakers eager to escape Washington for a weeklong recess. The move instead infuriated Democrats, who felt GOP leaders were trying to "jam" them into accepting the GOP bill.

"We're fed up with this," said Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the Democratic Whip. "They know what it takes for us to extend (stopgap funding) and keep the government in business. And this brinksmanship ... we're sick of it."

Unless Congress acts by midnight next Friday, much of the government will shut down. More immediate is the threat that the government's main disaster aid account will run out of money early next week
 

Lonecowboy

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With the Senate rejecting the bill, the Federal Emergency Management Agency may be out of funds as early as next week.
Recognizing this impending reality, Boehner’s spokesman, Michael Steel, attempted to convince the Senate to forge ahead. “The Senate should pass this bill immediately, and the president should sign it, because any political games will delay FEMA money that suffering American families desperately need.”
FEMA’s funds sit at approximately $212 million, but the House passed bill would add $3.7 billion to it. The Senate proposed a separate measure that would provide $6.9 billion to FEMA’s disaster relief fund.

Meanwhile, the House stopgap spending bill would have kept the federal government running through November 18. The legislation includes a 1.5 percent cut on domestic and defense agencies in order to meet the target of $1.043 trillion for 2012.
 

hypocritexposer

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Dems risk government shutdown so they can fund Democratic-linked 'slush fund'

According to DOE, almost $1 billion in loans have gone to two companies - Fisker Automotive and Tesla Motors - that specialize in super high-end luxury electric cars. The Fisker Karma plug-in hybrid has a base price of around $95,000; Tesla's Roadster starts at $109,000.

Fisker Automotive received a 529 million loan to help build a hybrid sports car . The company was tiny until it was engorged with taxpayer money. But who is backing this company? None other than Al Gore.

As for Tesla, its investors are donors to Democratic campaigns.

The Wall Street Journal covered this cronyism back in 2009:

http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2011/09/dems_risk_government_shutdown_so_they_can_fund_democratic-linked_slush_fund.html
 

Lonecowboy

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isn't oldtimer opposed to cronyism like this?


what do you think oldtimer, is this right what the dems are doing?

and don't try and justify and change the subject and say everyone is doing it and pull up some archaic article of republicans doing the same thing- just yes or no is this right or wrong what the democrats are doing?
 

hopalong

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lonecowboy, oldtime is incapable of giving a straight answer, or answering a question either YES OR No!!!!

Eh oldtimer??????
 

Steve

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I only know of one political leader with a record of fighting cronyism and corruption.. but she is hated by liberals and so-called independents..
 

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