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Tainted Mexican Imported Beef

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Anonymous

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October 21, 2011 Phone: 406-252-2516; [email protected]



Renewed Reports of Tainted Mexican Meat Highlight Need for USDA to Strengthen U.S. Country of Origin Labeling Rules for Consumers


Billings, Mont. – Just months after the Miami Herald’s June 13, 2011 headline, “Much of Mexican meat tainted with steroids,” which preceded an article that stated, “Much of Mexico’s beef is so tainted with the steroid clenbuterol that it sickens hundreds of people each year,” today’s news reports indicate Mexico’s tainted beef problem persists.


Meatingplace reported today that more than 100 Mexican athletes tested positive for clenbuteral after eating contaminated meat while “Mexican authorities have acknowledged issues in feeding banned steroids to livestock.”


As reported by Drovers CattleNetwork in July, the United States prohibited clenbuteral for extra-label uses in all food producing animals under the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification of 1994.



“Mexican beef is being imported into the United States in record volumes, with 2011 imports through August already exceeding levels for all of 2010,” said Mike Schultz, R-CALF USA COOL (Country of Origin Labeling) Committee Chair who added, “We’ve already imported nearly 90 million pounds of Mexican beef this year and if the number of Mexican live cattle imports keep pace with last year, we’re likely to import another 1.2 million head of live Mexican cattle.”



Schultz said these Mexican imports enter our U.S. food supply and the only way a consumer can choose to avoid products from countries with ongoing food safety problems like Mexico is by looking for the new country-of-origin label (COOL) that is required on ground beef and whole muscle cuts of beef sold at retail in the United States.



But Schultz said there’s a problem with those new COOL labels.



Schultz said foreign countries like Mexico and multinational meatpacker associations like the American Meat Institute (AMI) and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) pressured the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to include a huge loophole in the COOL rule to undermine Congress’ intent to reserve the USA label for meat exclusively born, raised, and slaughtered in the United States.



“USDA caved under the industry pressure and now allows USA meat products that are exclusively of U.S. origin to bear the label “Product of U.S. and Mexico,” or “Product of U.S., Mexico, and Canada,” Schultz said adding, “USDA kowtowed to foreign countries and to the multinational meatpackers who don’t want U.S. consumers to be able to differentiate U.S.-produced meat from foreign meat.



The USDA states, “Clenbuterol residues can affect lung and heart function in persons who have eaten liver or meat of animals given the drug.”



“American cattlemen and American consumers should be outraged that USDA has purposely written rules to make it extremely difficult for consumers to identify meat exclusively produced in the U.S. so they can avoid purchasing meat for their families that originates in countries with ongoing food safety issues,” Schultz added.



Schultz said R-CALF USA has made repeated requests to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack urging him to strengthen the U.S. COOL regulations.



“Our requests to USDA continue to fall on deaf ears, meanwhile demand for our U.S.-produced meat is being seriously harmed by imports of questionable safety,” Schultz concluded.


Industry News - AM
Mexican athletes test positive for clenbuterol, tainted meat to blame
By Andre Sulluchuco on 10/21/2011



More than 100 participating players in the “Under-17 World Cup” in Mexico tested positive for clenbuterol after eating contaminated meat, FIFA said on Monday.
Tests conducted in Germany found the agent in 109 of 208 urine samples, accounting for players from 19 of the 24 teams, the Associated Press reported.

Jiri Dvorak, FIFA medical officer, labeled the results as "highly surprising" but insisted that teenage soccer players were not cheating.

"It is not a problem of doping, but a problem of public health," Dvorak told reporters.

FIFA and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) have declined to prosecute anyone because evidence has pointed to contamination.

Mexican authorities have acknowledged issues in feeding banned steroids to livestock.
"Now it's known it's an issue, warnings are going to be sent," Olivier Niggli, the anti-doping watchdog's legal director, said in a conference call.

Mexico is now hosting the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, and athletes have been advised to eat in designated cafeterias.

Mexico's players tested “clean” because they switched to a fish and vegetables diet before the competition, Dvorak said.

The team management took those precautions when five members of Mexico's senior squad were suspended for testing positive for clenbuterol at a training camp for the Gold Cup.
 

flounder

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October 21, 2011 Phone: 406-252-2516; [email protected]

Renewed Reports of Tainted Mexican Meat Highlight Need for USDA to Strengthen U.S. Country of Origin Labeling Rules for Consumers


snip...


“USDA caved under the industry pressure and now allows USA meat products that are exclusively of U.S. origin to bear the label “Product of U.S. and Mexico,” or “Product of U.S., Mexico, and Canada,” Schultz said adding, “USDA kowtowed to foreign countries and to the multinational meatpackers who don’t want U.S. consumers to be able to differentiate U.S.-produced meat from foreign meat...snip...end



:nod: :nod: :nod:




it's the truth, and the BSe is political mad cow disease, or what i call the SSS policy, shoot, shovel and shut up. the trace back after the three cases of mad cow disease in the USA was a joke, and everybody knows it. YES, multinational meatpackers don’t want U.S. consumers to be able to differentiate U.S.-produced meat from foreign meat, because if by chance another mad cow ( FAD :liar: ) slipped through the cracks, and was documented by accident, with this loophole or the many loopholes in the surveillance and testing, USDA et al can blame it on the infamous FAD (foreign animal disease :liar: ) on Mexico, Canada, or any other country but the USA et al $$$


:nod: :arrow:



when in fact, it all probably started right here in the USA i.e. the mad cow, TSE, prion debacle $



Saturday, June 25, 2011

Transmissibility of BSE-L and Cattle-Adapted TME Prion Strain to Cynomolgus Macaque


"BSE-L in North America may have existed for decades"


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/06/transmissibility-of-bse-l-and-cattle.html



Over the next 8-10 weeks, approximately 40% of all the adult mink on the farm died from TME.

snip...

The rancher was a ''dead stock'' feeder using mostly (>95%) downer or dead dairy cattle...


http://web.archive.org/web/20030516051623/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m09/tab05.pdf



Sunday, June 26, 2011

Risk Analysis of Low-Dose Prion Exposures in Cynomolgus Macaque

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/06/risk-analysis-of-low-dose-prion.html



Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Galveston, Texas - Isle port moves through thousands of heifers headed to Russia, none from Texas, Alabama, or Washington, due to BSE risk factor

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/06/galveston-texas-isle-port-moves-through.html



Thursday, July 28, 2011

An Update on the Animal Disease Traceability Framework July 27, 2011

http://naiscoolyes.blogspot.com/2011/07/update-on-animal-disease-traceability.html



NAIS, COOL, FROM FARM TO FORK, MAD COW DISEASE AND

http://naiscoolyes.blogspot.com/



Monday, October 10, 2011

EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story

snip...

EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) recently delivered a scientific opinion on any possible epidemiological or molecular association between TSEs in animals and humans (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) and ECDC, 2011). This opinion confirmed Classical BSE prions as the only TSE agents demonstrated to be zoonotic so far but the possibility that a small proportion of human cases so far classified as "sporadic" CJD are of zoonotic origin could not be excluded. Moreover, transmission experiments to non-human primates suggest that some TSE agents in addition to Classical BSE prions in cattle (namely L-type Atypical BSE, Classical BSE in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) agents) might have zoonotic potential.

snip...

http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/e991.htm?emt=1


http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/e991.pdf


see follow-up here about North America BSE Mad Cow TSE prion risk factors, and the ever emerging strains of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in many species here in the USA, including humans ;

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/10/efsa-journal-2011-european-response-to.html



tss
 

Mike

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Wonder how OT gets by with the obvious Anti-Latino sentiment towards Mexicans and their imports to the U.S..

Another form of "Racism" that slips through the cracks?
 

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