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Jinglebob

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After reading Soap's thread on the shark cage and reading the comments, I thought I'd throw this one out there.

What kind of temperament do you expect from new mother cows and why?
 

Soapweed

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Jinglebob said:
After reading Soap's thread on the shark cage and reading the comments, I thought I'd throw this one out there.

What kind of temperament do you expect from new mother cows and why?

Moderation in all things. Not pets, but I want cattle that respect my space. Not flighty, but cattle that move out when called upon to do so. To be truthful, our cattle are trained just about perfect for the way we want them to be. They work well with horses, four wheelers, or when we are mere pedestrians. Many times we have had comments on how gentle our cattle handle when in sale barn conditions. They get lots of practice standing bunched in a fence corner while we sort on horseback. We sort for sex of calves before going to summer pasture. We sort for calf size and uniformity before selling. Replacement heifers are sorted while they still are sucking their mothers. This time of year, we sort heavies out of each bunch an average of twice a week. All of this killing time and messing around does keep our cattle quite docile.
 

rancherfred

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They can beller, blow snot in my face or breathe down my neck and I am fine, but the moment one of them starts actually threatening me she gets a black mark. I want a mother with a strong protective instinct, but that still understands and never forgets that I am at the top of the pecking order. If they threaten me beyond the bluster and bluffing I get rid of them. I don't have the time or the inclination to tolerate cattle that will injure me because I work alone almost all of the time when I am calving.
 

gcreekrch

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Ours don't get handled a lot but we try to handle them well when we do.

They can be worked the same as Soap's, from a saddle, bike seat or shank's mare when required. I want them to be protective of their calf. The best moms usually don't get their calves tagged for 2 or 3 days and after they have left them sleeping and gone to the feedrow. :lol:

As I said before, I would much rather a cow that moves off than one that closes her eyes and walks over you. Debbie says she knows the minute I get mad in the corrals as that is the only time I will pick up a weapon to sort with.

I have worked our cow herd many times when vaccinating by myself while Debbie feeds. Our system and handling allows me to average between 80 and 100 per hr. Don't think it could be done with cattle that were too gentle.
 
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I don't mine a cow thats protective, but I want it to settle down when that calf is about a week and half old.
 

randiliana

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With our system I want to be able to handle the calf, safely. I won't tolerate a cow that won't let me do it. The calm ones can be dangerous enough, I don't need a nasty one around. We tag, band and weigh all the calves, but always put a gate between us, just to be safe. If I can't walk up to the calf within a few hours of birth, chances are pretty good that that cow will go down the road in the fall. I want good mothers, but they should be able to tell the difference between me and a predator. We spend a lot of time on foot with them, so they are used to that.
 

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One advantage of not using cowdogs, is that our cows regard any dog or coyote as a predator and hopefully act accordingly. If cows get used to dogs being around, they are less apt to regard a coyote as an enemy. At least that is some soapweedy logic that possibly has merit. :wink:
 

randiliana

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Soapweed said:
One advantage of not using cowdogs, is that our cows regard any dog or coyote as a predator and hopefully act accordingly. If cows get used to dogs being around, they are less apt to regard a coyote as an enemy. At least that is some soapweedy logic that possibly has merit. :wink:

Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.
 

Soapweed

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randiliana said:
Soapweed said:
One advantage of not using cowdogs, is that our cows regard any dog or coyote as a predator and hopefully act accordingly. If cows get used to dogs being around, they are less apt to regard a coyote as an enemy. At least that is some soapweedy logic that possibly has merit. :wink:

Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.

Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
 

Jinglebob

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Soapweed said:
randiliana said:
Soapweed said:
One advantage of not using cowdogs, is that our cows regard any dog or coyote as a predator and hopefully act accordingly. If cows get used to dogs being around, they are less apt to regard a coyote as an enemy. At least that is some soapweedy logic that possibly has merit. :wink:

Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.

Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
Are you saying your cows are stupid? Can't tell the difference between a coyote and a dog? :wink:
 

Denny

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Jinglebob said:
Soapweed said:
randiliana said:
Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.

Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
Are you saying your cows are stupid? Can't tell the difference between a coyote and a dog? :wink:

A canine is a canine more damage done by the neighbors dog than coyotes here. Thats why I let the wind out of any canine.
 

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The most dangerous predator you can find is a pack of dogs. When they get to packing up watch out.
 

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Jinglebob said:
Soapweed said:
randiliana said:
Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.

Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
Are you saying your cows are stupid? Can't tell the difference between a coyote and a dog? :wink:

Stupid they ain't!

Our cows are quite accustomed to our dog walking around amongst them, but will go snaky if a stray or neighbor's dog shows up in the field, especially at calving.

A couple of springs ago, I went back to check or feed them and saw a coyote sneaking along the fence, back toward the bushlot. That explained why the cows were all antsy and dancey and heads up when I drove up toward them.

They know!
 

I Luv Herfrds

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Ones that do not mash us into the ground when we tag the calves, but will take a dog or coyote.

Unfortunately my dogs hide behind me when they tick off the cow.
 

Jake

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I am probably too lenient on "mothery" cows. As long as they don't smoke me I'm fine with them. We have had significant issues with predators so gotta keep a few of those coyote/dog killers around. For the most part they all settle down after a week or so.

My other issue is if I culled for all the cows that a lot of people would it would drastically hurt my ability to keep expanding.
 

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We don't tag at birth, so I am fine with cows that provide a good reason to stay on the horse. I don't like crazy, but I don't like pets. The worst cattle we have ever had are 4-H heifers that become cows. They don't have the same flight zone as the rest of the herd, and they are hugely in the way. I would rather have a cow that I know will come after me than one that will not get out of the road.
 

Justin

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Jinglebob said:
After reading Soap's thread on the shark cage and reading the comments, I thought I'd throw this one out there.

What kind of temperament do you expect from new mother cows and why?

seems like a silly question.
 

cure

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burnt said:
Jinglebob said:
Soapweed said:
Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
Are you saying your cows are stupid? Can't tell the difference between a coyote and a dog? :wink:

Stupid they ain't!

Our cows are quite accustomed to our dog walking around amongst them, but will go snaky if a stray or neighbor's dog shows up in the field, especially at calving.

A couple of springs ago, I went back to check or feed them and saw a coyote sneaking along the fence, back toward the bushlot. That explained why the cows were all antsy and dancey and heads up when I drove up toward them.

They know![/quote

our rule of thumb is no dogs till we get to the summer ground then release the hounds I have found that I can more cows with two dogs than I can with three riders I can send dogs off though the brush where a horse and ride can't go and get them out but I will say this and good dog is priceless but a bad one can't be shot fast enough. As for cows temperment I want some fire in them but I will not have a man hater around because of our winter permit and all the four wheelers out there my cows hate wheelers and I have concluded that if I want to work our cows nice and quite I get a horse
 

John SD

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Jinglebob said:
Soapweed said:
randiliana said:
Actually, I disagree with that. We have 3 dogs around, the very aggressive working cow dog Kit, the pyrenees guardian dog Rosa, and the more or less, useless yard dog Blue (heeler/basset hound). The cows act totally different around the working dog than they do around the other 2. They totally ignore Rosa and Blue, but when Kit is around, they are completely different.

Our two dogs and the Kosmo Kid's bloodhound all fall into the "useless" category, but when they do inadvertantly show up among the cattle, they don't get ignored. The cows don't like having them around, and that is fine with me. I don't like having them around, either. Our cows don't like having coyotes around, and quite a commotion is stirred up when any canines appear. I think a coyote is less able to slip in and do damage with this mindset in our cattle.
Are you saying your cows are stupid? Can't tell the difference between a coyote and a dog? :wink:

I'd say a cow that has just calved has raging hormones, possibly equal to or worse than wimmen with PMS. :wink: A newly calved cow cannot be trusted to think in normal "cow logic".

Any canine, any small animal like a cat or a skunk is seen as a threat. This also includes little kids who should not be in possible harms way around newly calved cows.

I've seen a cow get very involved with a porcupine and it wasn't pretty.
 

Jinglebob

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Justin said:
Jinglebob said:
After reading Soap's thread on the shark cage and reading the comments, I thought I'd throw this one out there.

What kind of temperament do you expect from new mother cows and why?

seems like a silly question.
Must be a lot of silly people on here that answered, huh? :wink:

While moving the neighbors cows to summer pasture late last May, all of a sudden there was wild things going on to the front of the bunch, cows milling and bawling. When we got there, there was a baby fawn, if real poor shape. Most had month to 2 or 3 month old calves following them. I'd say that is good mothering instinct.

Some guys who have been having trouble with coyotes need a couple big longhorn steers with HORNS, which God gave to bovines to protect them selves. Man, in his wisdom, has taken most of their defenses away from them.

By the way Justin, now I remember why I quit coming here.
 
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