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Texas herd to be "Surveyed"

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Bill

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"Surveyed", "trying to identify" Those are terms which should really instill confidence in the US system. I am starting to wonder if it wouldn't have been better if the second US BSE case could also have been traced back to Canada. At least we could do a proper investigation and confidence towards safety of North American cattle and beef may be re-established. Oh and she wasn't a "Downer" she was DEADwhich is a big freakin' difference.


Posted on Fri, Jul. 01, 2005

Officials to survey Texas herd for mad cow

BETSY BLANEY
Associated Press
LUBBOCK, Texas - Animals in the Texas herd that produced the first homegrown case of mad cow disease will be surveyed in coming weeks to identify cattle born around the same time and the infected bovine's recent offspring.

The checks come as agriculture officials work to ensure that other cattle in the herd are not carrying the brain-wasting disease.

The infected 12-year-old beef cow was born, raised and used for breeding at the same ranch and had never left the property, authorities said Thursday. They would not identify the ranch or the size of the herd.

Agriculture officials announced Wednesday the latest confirmed case of mad cow disease in the United States had been traced to the animal, which was a "downer" that could not walk. The cow arrived dead at a pet-food plant in Waco, Texas, in November and never entered the nation's human food supply.

It was the first time the disease has been confirmed in a U.S.-born cow. The other U.S. case was in a dairy cow imported from Canada.

The state Animal Health Commission put a hold on the ranch's cattle earlier this month when tests indicated a mad cow case among the herd.

Officials have said the infection most likely started with contaminated feed eaten before August 1997, when the United States and Canada began banning cow parts in cattle feed. The cow was born about four years before the feed ban was implemented.

Officials also are trying to identify herd mates born within one year of the infected cow's birth, as well as any offspring born within the past two years and other related cattle.

USDA Chief Veterinarian John Clifford said it is "highly unusual" to find the disease in more than one animal in a herd or in an affected animal's offspring.

The animal arrived dead at Champion Pet Food. An initial screening indicated the presence of mad cow, but more sophisticated follow-up tests were negative. However, samples were sent to a British lab that found the animal had the disease. The carcass was later incinerated.

Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration will trace the feed history of animals born on the ranch around the same time as the infected cow, including any animals no longer on the farm.

Investigators will also examine compliance records for plants that may have processed meat and bone meal from relatives or herd mates of the sick animal to see whether the companies complied with the feed ban regulations.

The Agriculture Department began monitoring cattle more aggressively after the first U.S. case of mad cow disease was discovered in December 2003 in Washington state. More than 400,000 cattle have been tested since June 2004.

Texas is the leading cattle state in the nation with 13.8 million head or 15 percent of the U.S. cattle inventory.

Mad cow disease, medically known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, is a brain-wasting illness that infects cattle. It is believed to be spread when a cow eats meal that contains spinal or brain tissue of an animal infected with BSE. Humans can get a related illness, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, if they eat infected tissue.
 

HAY MAKER

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One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck
 

HAY MAKER

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reader (the Second) said:
HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

Now Haymaker, be honest, the confusion and lack of transparency and mixups with this one cow suggest that the entire 400,000 tested could be at question. Certainly, the one cow that was accidentally found implies that USDA should continue the ban on downers and should continue testing at the current level or higher with changes in testing protocol. All of which they have said they would do. Yea for them.

I have to agree reader,test em all here and canada,lets see where we are at and where we are going I believe this foot dragging has been going on long enough ,the more we test the faster we all get back to normal,damn packers hollering about a two dollar test when the long term consequences could be devastating................good luck
 

Manitoba_Rancher

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HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

I think the same should go for us in Canada..... what do ya think haymaker?
 

Tam

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HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

Wasn't the Alberta May 2003 cow just one cow born well before the feed bans were implimented Haymaker? Why is it so much different now that it is the US?
 

Bill

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Tam said:
HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

Wasn't the Alberta May 2003 cow just one cow born well before the feed bans were implimented Haymaker? Why is it so much different now that it is the US?
The difference is that Haymaker has been putting his money and support behind R-Calf and now he is worried that Leo will be demanding the Texas border be closed for 7 years. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Tam

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HAY MAKER said:
reader (the Second) said:
HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

Now Haymaker, be honest, the confusion and lack of transparency and mixups with this one cow suggest that the entire 400,000 tested could be at question. Certainly, the one cow that was accidentally found implies that USDA should continue the ban on downers and should continue testing at the current level or higher with changes in testing protocol. All of which they have said they would do. Yea for them.

I have to agree reader,test em all here and canada,lets see where we are at and where we are going I believe this foot dragging has been going on long enough ,the more we test the faster we all get back to normal,damn packers hollering about a two dollar test when the long term consequences could be devastating................good luck

Haymaker wasn't it R-CALF that were holloring about the cost of a ID tag and refusing to be burden with the cost of traceback of the US herd, which is now proving to be a problem. and Why would the packers hollor about the cost of a test they will just pass the cost of the test back to the feedlot guy which in turn with pass it back to the cow calf guy which by the way has no one to pass the cost back to. When and If the US goes to 100% testing for market access it will be a cost the producers will be bearing not the packers. Just like it will be the Producer that will be bearing the cost of guaranteeing the M"COOL" label with a National ID tagging system. Look who will be holloring then Haymaker it will be those same guys that are holloring about how long it is taking the USDA to find the cattle involved in your first BSE native born case, the producers themselves.
 

Murgen

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The animal arrived dead at Champion Pet Food. An initial screening indicated the presence of mad cow, but more sophisticated follow-up tests were negative. However, samples were sent to a British lab that found the animal had the disease. The carcass was later incinerated

When was this cow incinerated? After the first, second or third test? She must have been laying around for quite awhile.
 

Clarence

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Come now you dumb Canadians, yes I said "Dumb". You are trying to fish for something. You take some reporters words, " surveyed" and "trying to identify" and attempting to make something of it. Didn't Canada kill and test 2700 cows un-necessaryly and didn't come up with a d----ed thing.

My thinking is that this cow and the Canadian infected cows were fed imported meat and bone meal. It was believed that feed was the cause of the infection long before the feed ban was in place, but some were still importing it from countries known to have BSE. There is a difference between legal and ethical. Now both of our governments are unwilling to go and find those who are responsible for importing questionable feed.

My biggest complaint on this cow is, Why didn't they do the complete test last November. This is what is hurting the USDA's creditability.
 

HAY MAKER

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Manitoba_Rancher said:
HAY MAKER said:
One case of BSE in a twelve year old,should have no bearing on the United States trading status,as she was born well before the feed ban..............good luck

I think the same should go for us in Canada..... what do ya think haymaker?

Was all your BSE cases in cattle born before the feed ban?...........PS if they were then yes,it should.
 

Mike

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Murgen said:
The animal arrived dead at Champion Pet Food. An initial screening indicated the presence of mad cow, but more sophisticated follow-up tests were negative. However, samples were sent to a British lab that found the animal had the disease. The carcass was later incinerated

When was this cow incinerated? After the first, second or third test? She must have been laying around for quite awhile.

Murgen, In case you might not know the way the process works. :roll: Brain samples are taken, then the cow can be incinerated and tests are run from those samples. Your question DOES bring up one fact though.
The May 2003 Canadian cow (or head-or samples?) DID IN FACT "lay around for quite awhile", as you said, didn't she?
I do not condone the mistakes made by any testing methods but we must start learning from these mistakes in order to insure consumer confidence.
 

Bill

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Clarence said:
Come now you dumb Canadians, yes I said "Dumb". You are trying to fish for something. You take some reporters words, " surveyed" and "trying to identify" and attempting to make something of it. Didn't Canada kill and test 2700 cows un-necessaryly and didn't come up with a d----ed thing.

My thinking is that this cow and the Canadian infected cows were fed imported meat and bone meal. It was believed that feed was the cause of the infection long before the feed ban was in place, but some were still importing it from countries known to have BSE. There is a difference between legal and ethical. Now both of our governments are unwilling to go and find those who are responsible for importing questionable feed.

My biggest complaint on this cow is, Why didn't they do the complete test last November. This is what is hurting the USDA's creditability.

A couple of points to you from a 'Dumb" Canadian. There were two reasons for Canada testing that many animals in the initial traceouts in May 2003.

1-THAT WAS THE STANDARD. Excuse us for for follwing the standard of the time. We also wanted to make sure the prevelance of BSE was as limited as we have found it to be or the US would have most definitely NOT have been re-opened to Canadian boxed beef. It wasn't until the USDA couldn't complete the traceouts from the first US case that these standards seemed to have changed because they couldn't be met due to the lack of a US I.D. system. It's a good thing we were that thorough and didn't come up with a d----ed thing. It restored confidence in the Canadian system. I hope we can soon say that about the US!

2-YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT. Both the US and Canada quit importing feed and animals from the UK too late.

This "dumb" Canadian is darn glad our system was as thorough or North American consumer confidence in beef would not be as strong as it is and the latest US case would be cast in a far different light. Canadians showed the world that BSE is not a reason to avoid beef unlike what happened in ALL other countries prior and it was ENTIRELY due to the thoroughness and openness displayed by CFIA. The USDA can take some lessons in that regard.
 

Maple Leaf Angus

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I don't think we will get too far by calling anyone dumb, (even if it's the truth :D ).


But, I will stand by a post that I made a few months ago. That post stated that this whole process of the discovery of BSE in North America was a setup designed to avoid the melt-down of the North American beef industry. Anyone with half a mind could not deny that BSE would eventually surface in our herds.

It was logical that it would be "discovered" in Canada first, and after the market absorbed that information without a huge consumer scare, it would be safe to "acknowledge" the presence of BSE in the U.S.

So, just like in WWII, we provided some good shock troops. Doesn't that make you proud to be a Canadian Rancher or Farmer? :x


So, if the market absorbs (without flinching) the "discovery" of BSE in the U.S. herd, it could very well be said that it is because the Canadians took the fall for the American sake. And some of you Americans wonder at the bitterness displayed by the Canadians!

Oh well, I guess we shouldn't be concerned about losing 10-15 years of equity, should we. After all, that's only half of my farming years!
 

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