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they just don't get it

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Lonecowboy

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they just don't get it do they- now instead of listening to "We the People"obama and co. are blaming us.
Hello- the will of the people picked those "TEA party" Republicans to represent us for a reason- to shut off the money spigot to you big spending big borrowing liberals. so now obama is just complaining about what the people of America want. What an infant!


WASHINGTON -- Republican leaders are putting the demands of 30 Tea Party members over 300 million Americans, a top White House adviser said Sunday, insisting that Congress pass a resolution to keep government functioning and approve President Obama's jobs plan.

Senior adviser David Plouffe, who managed the president's 2008 campaign, said the Tea Party is controlling the debate in Congress, even as it comes close to a government shutdown over how to pay for disaster relief as part of a continuing resolution to keep government operating.

"We're not going to make progress on the deficit, on things we can do right now for jobs, on tax cuts, unless those 30 or 40 Tea Party members of the Republican House stop being the focal point of our discussion," Plouffe said.

Senate Democrats on Friday defeated a House GOP-backed stopgap continuing resolution to fund the government through Nov. 18 by a vote of 59-36. The $1.04 trillion measure contained $3.7 billion for disaster aid, $200 million of which was offset by cuts to green energy programs, including a loan account that once helped fund the now-defunct, controversial solar panel firm Solyndra.

Without a continuing resolution, government is set to shut down on Friday. But the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Disaster Relief Fund is poised to run out of cash by Tuesday, if not earlier, with the account at the dangerously-low level of $175 million, according to Senate aides.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has offered a substitute for the CR that strips the offsets, and a procedural vote is set for Monday night in the Senate. But the chamber's GOP leader, Mitch McConnell, predicted that bill's demise.

"Our friends on the other side don't like the idea. They'd rather just add these funds to the deficit. Why?," McConnell asked on Friday. "Because they say that's the way we've always done things around here. Well, I think there's a lesson we can draw from the debates we've been having here over the last six months, is that the American people won't accept that excuse any longer."
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaking after Plouffe on Sunday, said the government is not in danger of shutdown because Americans want a deal on disaster relief, but suggested Reid take up the House proposal because it provides a plan for paying for disasters while also cutting government "in other places where the money is not so important."

"We can't borrow money every time something bad goes wrong in America. Are you able to borrow money every time something bad goes with your business or your family? You have to have priorities. That's something we don't seem to accept up here," Graham said.

But Plouffe said the debt-ceiling negotiations have already set a floor for deficit reductions, and the CR should not be controversial.

It is a "basic function of Congress to keep the government running," he said, adding that lawmakers shouldn't "play politics" by tying disaster aid to offsets that critics say will force job cuts.

"Stop playing politics, do the right thing for the country and let's make sure that we are not playing politics with disasters," he said.

Plouffe added that many items Obama proposed over the spring to put the economy back on the right track would be part of law today had House Speaker John Boehner agreed to a "grand bargain" and not folded to the will of a minority in his party that refuses to allow tax increases.

He added that several items would pass with bipartisan support in the Senate and House if the GOP leadership's "entire approach" wasn't "how do we keep those Tea Party members happy?"

"And I think the country is tired of it because we are not going to move forward together as a country unless we do so in a bipartisan way," he said.

But even as Plouffe argues that the Tea Party is creating a barrier to compromise, the president's "class warfare" approach to tax rates has many questioning the foundation of the argument

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2011/09/25/white-house-aide-upper-income-dont-pay-fair-share-taxes/#ixzz1Z01rCZn3
 

Steve

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But even as Plouffe argues that the Tea Party is creating a barrier to compromise,

The $1.04 trillion measure contained $3.7 billion for disaster aid, $200 million of which was offset by cuts

that doesn't look like a barrier... a barrier would be them asking for 1.04 trillion in cuts... or 3.7 billion in cuts..

asking for 200 million in cuts to a floundering program is commonsense and more then a fair compromise..

my math may be off a bit,
overall as a percentage of the full bill.. it is less then 2%
and compared to the disaster funding it is only a little over 5%

asking liberals to accept a miniscule cut in a pet project to fund what is needed is apparently to much to ask.. :? :???: :roll:
 

Lonecowboy

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Great point with the percentages Steve!!

here is even more proof they don't get it:

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Sunday shows that 20% of the nation's voters Strongly Approve of the way that Barack Obama is performing his role as president. Forty-three percent (43%) Strongly Disapprove, giving Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of -23

43% strongly disapprove is not a very good way to start a reelection campaign is it? :shock:
 

Lonecowboy

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I think people are getting a little tired of the blame game- be a big boy and put on your pull ups obama!
it's always everyone elses fault!

ATHERTON, California – President Barack Obama charged that the Republican vision of government would "fundamentally cripple America," as he tried out his newly combative message on the liberal West Coast.

Aiming to renew the ardor of Democratic loyalists who have grown increasingly disenchanted with him, the president on Sunday mixed frontal attacks on Republicans with words of encouragement intended to buck up the faithful as the 2012 campaign revs up.

"From the moment I took office, what we've seen is a constant ideological pushback against any kind of sensible reforms that would make our economy work better and give people more opportunity," the president said at an intimate brunch fundraiser at the Medina, Wash., home of former Microsoft executive Jon Shirley, where about 65 guests were paying $35,800 per couple to listen to Obama.

Similar messages followed at an event in Seattle and two more in California's Silicon Valley Sunday evening, as Obama pushed through a seven-stop fundraising swing that was taking him from Seattle to Hollywood to San Diego through Monday. The three-day West Coast swing, ending Tuesday in Denver, offered him the chance to re-engage with some of his most liberal and deep-pocketed supporters.

The trip comes as Obama has shifted from focusing on compromise with Republicans on Capitol Hill to calling out House Speaker John Boehner and others by name. The president has criticized them as obstructionists while demanding their help in passing his $447 billion jobs bill.

The revamped approach is a relief to Democratic activists fed up by what they viewed as the president's ceding of ground to the Republicans on tax cuts and other issues while the U.S. economy has stalled and unemployment is stuck above 9 percent.

Obama said 2012 would be an especially tough election because people are discouraged and disillusioned with government, but he also said he was determined because so much is at stake
 
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