• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Trailers

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Nicky

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
3,223
Reaction score
108
Location
N.E. Oregon
What kind of aluminum trailers are you liking. Ours is about shot. It is a welded one and on all the welds have been welded and rewelded. We've got it in getting worked on, want to get it sellable then get a new one (if that is possible in the somewhat near future). We've been looking at Wilson's and Merrit's.
 

leanin' H

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
6,350
Reaction score
842
Location
Western Utah Desert
Hard to beat either a Wilson or Merrit. Friends have both and love them. These desert roads are hard on trailers but both seem to hold up well. I’ve got an old Sooner and it’s been a great stock trailer. I’ve had to work on it too but it’s still doing the job for me
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,225
Reaction score
445
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
We have pulled Featherlite's for years. Delivered a lot of mineral down gravel and scoria roads, besides hauling cattle and horses and they have held up extraordinarily well.
Good luck finding what you want. Mr. FH thinks the new Wilsons are really slick. FWIW.
 

Haytrucker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
761
Reaction score
49
Featherlite or Merritt, they both have strong points. I have seen, and helped, both tried out to extremes; neither will disappoint. I've used shorter models of the former and a 32 foot Merritt, but that was behind a 550 Super-duty. Your pickup can pull 4 foot more aluminum, the question's are what will it carry and stop.
 

Haytrucker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
761
Reaction score
49
Some neighbors pull a Wilson and it's a solid trailer. My brother put over 40,000 miles on an Exiss 36 foot, no pasture use. They probably cost the most, but Featherlite. I've hauled bulls and the horses that gathered them out of some rough terrain. 28 foot behind a Dodge Cummins single rear. That was '08, it's still in use. Merritt may not last that long or well, on second thought.
 

webfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
556
Reaction score
591
Location
NE Oregon
I have a 2013 Wilson which is most likely going to out last me. I really like the trailer.
 

webfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
556
Reaction score
591
Location
NE Oregon
I had an old Morgan built steel trailer that was rusting out. When I picked up my new Wilson on my way home I kept looking in the rear view mirror. Is it still back there? It pulled so much easier it was like it wasn't there.
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,225
Reaction score
445
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
We had a Wilson but traded it for a Featherlite because the Wilson was too low to the ground and the rubber bumper started to tear off out in the hills. We had trouble with the brakes on it too. Took it in for repair and they loaned us the Featherlite so we wouldn't be without a trailer. It was higher off the ground, so we just kept it and didn't go back for the Wilson. The Wilson also had ridges that ran the full length of the floor which wouldn't be an issue for most people. We were delivering mineral on small pallets and that made it hard to wheel the cart into the trailer to unload the mineral in the trailer. That was a long time ago though and we would be the last ones to say Wilson's aren't good trailers, because they are. Before that we had Titan steel trailer. Before that a SWAN trailer. We bought that Swan in 1974, gooseneck trailers were fairly new then. It was made out of iron. We used it for years. It was double tough, only 16' long so not too heavy to pull. We have lots of stories about that old trailer. We loved it. It was nothing like an aluminum trailer, but for the time, it was the best trailer.
 

Latest posts

Top