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Chuckie

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first--if there's a funky "chuckie" avatar attached, it's my dear daughter's idea of fun! i wanted a dobie, but "we" couldn't get it the right size. i'm REALLY not a freako murderer. i'm just not smart enough with this techno stuff to fix it right now :oops:

anyway: do any of you use tennessee walkin' horses? if so, what do you think? i know there're some breeders in the wild west that use them for cow work, packing, paid hunters,etc. i also know they aren't "cowy" like a good quarter horse, but boy, can they cover ground, and at a really comfortable gait.

i love 'em myself, but don't work cows horseback, either. what do ya think?

btw, it's GOOD to back on! :D
 

Faster horses

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Chuckie, glad to have you back.

Let's see. Tennessee Walking Horses. Here in Montana they are popular for Forest Service Personnel to use in the mountains. Very popular, in fact. They never have quite made the grade for cow horses. Along with not being known as a 'cowy' breed, they just aren't quick enough. Their forte is walking, not turning, not jumping out to catch a fast calf or yearling. So there is my opinion. And it is worth just what it cost. :wink:

Hey, if someone comes one here and posts that they love 'em for cow work, that's terrific. There are exceptions to everything, and I am talking generalities.

I know folks who have them that wouldn't ride anything else.
 

Chuckie

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well, they just are not bred for cow work, and i don't think they'll ever come close to a cowy QH for it, but i've seen a few breeders in MT/WY which interested me: i can see where they would be plumb handy in certain situations, but not necessarily for cow work. because, believe me, they are the most comfortable ride for covering ground that there is.

you might get the idea that i'm a little predjudice in their favor, and you'd be right. it all depends on what you use your horse for, doesn't it?

i have an 83 yr old friend, whose Dad was a horse trader, grew up with broncs, mules, drafts--i would Love to get him on a walkin' horse, cause he can't stand a trottin' sob...and he'd love to ride again...

of course, i do love a walker--they ARE a ride... :)
 

carole3218

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Chuckie said:
well, they just are not bred for cow work, and i don't think they'll ever come close to a cowy QH for it, but i've seen a few breeders in MT/WY which interested me: i can see where they would be plumb handy in certain situations, but not necessarily for cow work. because, believe me, they are the most comfortable ride for covering ground that there is.

you might get the idea that i'm a little predjudice in their favor, and you'd be right. it all depends on what you use your horse for, doesn't it?

i have an 83 yr old friend, whose Dad was a horse trader, grew up with broncs, mules, drafts--i would Love to get him on a walkin' horse, cause he can't stand a trottin' sob...and he'd love to ride again...

of course, i do love a walker--they ARE a ride... :)

I read an article in the July/August 2005 issue of the American Cowboy magazine on the Tennessee Walking horse. It said it is the fastest growing breed due to all the baby boomers who can't take the jolt anymore in riding. You might want to check it out as it appears on page 54. They have 3 gaits, the flat walk, running walk and rocking-horse cantor that comes from deep within its hind quarters. They are good looking horses in the pictures. Hope that helps you, Chuckie, Cheers

Check out my husband's daughter ad on page 119 for www.artoutwest.com. It is a great site but I am biased since I was the one who started it. :lol:
 

Soapweed

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The big buckskin horse that I've pictured on Ranch Talk, "Yellowstone", is half Tennessee Walking Horse and half Quarter Horse. He isn't super cowy but he's cowy enough, and he can get the job done. He's smooth riding, good for lots of miles, and big enough to hold anything you can get a loop on. Like other horses I've had through the years, I like him real well and it would take a lot of money for me to sell him. Yet a new owner might not like him at all. Guess everyone has different standards and that is what makes the world go around.

Personally, I'd say give a TWH a try. They might just be your cup of tea.
 

Faster horses

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I was pretty sure you mentioned earlier that your Yellowstone horse was part Tennessee Walker, Soapweed. And I agree that they can be really good to ride. Some of the little cuttin' horses just wouldn't 'cut it' out in your big pastures. They have bred much of the size and bone out of some of the QH's.

My daughter's ex-in-laws (how's that for a word?) raise Missouri Fox Trotters and they are nice horses with nice smooth gaits, similar to Tennesse Walkers. They sure are gentle horses, too.


I guess I just appreciate a good horse, doesn't matter what breed they are. Some are just naturally a little better at some things than others.
 

Silver

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In my own humble opinion, another great ride can be the Paso Fino. I can hardly believe I'm saying this, but after being around them for several years now I've come to see that not only are they smooth, but athletic and often quite cowy too. My dad's girlfriend raises them, and crossed with quarter horse often you get the gait and the cow with enough muscle and bone.
 

Chuckie

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i've seen a couple of paso's gaiting, and when you first see it, it looks like they're doing a lot of work and not covering much ground, but it does look smooth. i heard/read somewhere that they are cowy, but that's kinda in their breeding anyway, isn't it? but the ones i saw were small--like 14'2 or so..my legs would come down past their knees :roll:

one thing i've always loved about a walker is that they are the SWEETEST tempered breed i've ever worked with; you can hardly find a bad-tempered one.

and i've always wanted to try a MFT, but never had a chance..so far... :cry:
 

carole3218

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There is a old line of horses that is coming around the bend called
Rocky Mountain Horses and I will enclose the web site for you guys to reveiw. I remember reading about them some where but I couldn't remember the specific. www.rmhorse.com

Giving you guys the website is better than me writing a bunch of stuff that I am not sure about.

I went back and read the story of the Rocky Mountain Horses history to the late 1890's and it is pretty remarkable. It sounds like to me they are also gaited, drivable and friendly.

:)
Beautiful Sunday in the Rockies!
 

Silver

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Chuckie said:
but the ones i saw were small--like 14'2 or so..my legs would come down past their knees :roll:



Gee, how tall are you? Lots of the great cutters are less than 14'2, with big guys on them. My favorite horse right now is a Big Step horse, just makes 14, and let me tell you I feel very well mounted on her, and I'm not little.
Oh... and another nice ride (and there is a lot of prejudice against them, but thats for another thread) is a good old fashioned appy.
 

Nicky

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Well, since I finally made it back to computer land, and we raise TWH's I'll put my two bits in also!
We ranch in rough, steep, rocky country and all we own are TWH's, our neighbors have lived and ranched here forever and even if their horses are shod, they call to borrow horses when they have to go do something horseback. You aren't going to take them to a snaffle bit futurity or big time teamroping but for ranch cutting and ropeing they do great. We have several that will make you sit up and pay attention when cutting something out. And of course if you have a lot of country to cover you really like them :)
 

Nicky

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Another thing, there are two types of walking horses - the real loose moving "show" type and the shorter gaited "using" type. We prefer the latter type. A real long gaited horse will be smooth in tall cover, mud, uphill etc but won't be as athletic, and won't do as well in rough country.
Foxtrotters make great ranch horses as well, in fact that is what they were originally bred for. My hubby had one that just died last summer, he was a HORSE!
 

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