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U. S. Military deaths in Iraq

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Cowpuncher

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Something to chew on:

By Samuel H. Preston and Emily Buzzell
Saturday, August 26, 2006; Page A21



The consequences of Operation Iraqi Freedom for U.S. forces are being documented by the Defense Department with an exceptional degree of openness and transparency. Its daily and cumulative counts of deaths receive a great deal of publicity. But deaths alone don't indicate the risk for an individual. For this purpose, the number of deaths must be compared with the number of individuals exposed to the risk of death. The Defense Department has supplied us with appropriate data on exposure, and we take advantage of it to provide the first profile of military mortality in Iraq.



Between March 21, 2003, when the first military death was recorded in Iraq, and March 31, 2006, there were 2,321 deaths among American troops in Iraq. Seventy-nine percent were a result of action by hostile forces. Troops spent a total of 592,002 "person-years" in Iraq during this period. The ratio of deaths to person-years, .00392, or 3.92 deaths per 1,000 person-years, is the death rate of military personnel in Iraq.



U.S. Fatalities



Portraits of U.S. service members who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001. Search for soldiers by state or territory, city, age, date or branch of service and see them plotted on a map.



How does this rate compare with that in other groups? One meaningful comparison is to the civilian population of the United States. That rate was 8.42 per 1,000 in 2003, more than twice that for military personnel in Iraq.



The comparison is imperfect, of course, because a much higher fraction of the American population is elderly and subject to higher death rates from degenerative diseases. The death rate for U.S. men ages 18 to 39 in 2003 was 1.53 per 1,000 -- 39 percent of that of troops in Iraq. But one can also find something equivalent to combat conditions on home soil. The death rate for African American men ages 20 to 34 in Philadelphia was 4.37 per 1,000 in 2002, 11 percent higher than among troops in Iraq. Slightly more than half the Philadelphia deaths were homicides.



The death rate of American troops in Vietnam was 5.6 times that observed in Iraq. Part of the reduction in the death rate is attributable to improvements in military medicine and such things as the use of body armor. These have reduced the ratio of deaths to wounds from 24 percent in Vietnam to 13 percent in Iraq. Some other factors to be considered:



Branch of service: Marines are paying the highest toll in Iraq. Their death rate is more than double that of the Army, 10 times higher than that of the Navy and 20 times higher than for the Air Force. In fact, those in the Navy and Air Force have substantially lower death rates than civilian men ages 20 to 34.



Among the Marines, there is in effect no difference in the mortality risks for members on active duty and those in the reserve. In the Army, on the other hand, reservists have 33 percent of the death rate of those in active service because they are not assigned to combat positions. Members of the Army National Guard are intermediate in assignments and in mortality.



Rank: In both the Army and the Marines, enlisted personnel have 40 percent higher mortality than officers. The excess mortality of enlisted soldiers is diminished by the high mortality of the lowest-ranking officers, lieutenants, who are typically the leaders of combat patrols. Lieutenants have the highest mortality of any rank in the Army, 19 percent higher than all Army troops combined. Marine Corps lieutenants have 11 percent higher mortality than all Marines. But the single highest-mortality group in any service consists of lance corporals in the Marines, whose death risk is 3.3 times that of all troops in Iraq.



Age, sex , race and ethnicity: In contrast to the civilian population, mortality rates decline precipitously with age. Troops ages 17 to 19 have a death risk 4.6 times that of those 50 and older. Differences in rank by age undoubtedly contribute to this pattern, and so do differences in branch of service. Sixty-five percent of Marine deployments to Iraq were of those age 24 or younger, compared with only 39 percent of Army deployments. Women are not assigned to combat specialties in Iraq, although they do see enemy fire; their death rate is 18 percent that of men.



Identifying racial and ethnic differences in mortality is not straightforward because the Defense Department uses a different classification system for deaths than for deployments. Nevertheless, all attempts we have made to reconcile the two systems reach the same conclusion: Hispanics have a death risk about 20 percent higher than non-Hispanics, and blacks have a death risk about 30 to 40 percent lower than that of non-blacks. That low death rate appears to result from an overrepresentation of blacks in low-risk categories: For example, 19 percent of blacks in Iraq are women, compared with 9 percent of non-blacks, while 7 percent of blacks in Iraq are Marines, compared with 13 percent of non-blacks.



Other casualties: The number of wounded in Iraq through March 31, 2006, was 7.5 times the number of dead; the rate at which wounds are incurred was one per 33 troops per year. We do not have the same information about the characteristics of those wounded as we have about those killed. But given the overwhelming importance of hostile encounters in both wounds and deaths, it is likely that variations in the risk of being wounded are quite similar to those presented here.



Samuel H. Preston is the Frederick J. Warren professor of demography at the University of Pennsylvania. Emily Buzzell is a student in the Health and Societies Program at Penn.
 

Kathy

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Between March 21, 2003, when the first military death was recorded in Iraq, and March 31, 2006, there were 2,321 deaths among American troops in Iraq.

The authors of this article write about deaths while serving in Iraq. They fail to acknowledge the deaths and disabilities which have occurred once returned to America.

After the first Gulf War, over 265,433 veterans/soldiers applied to Veterans Affairs for permanent disability and medical care, for life.

As of the time May 30, 2006 - inclusive of the time from August 1990 to May 30, 2006 383,913 veterans/soldiers have applied for permanent disability and permanent medical care.

Of the total deployed since August of 1990, amounting to 1,129,340
only 943,000 are still alive. This means 186, 340 of America's sons and daughters who served in either GWI and/or GWII have DIED since the initial attacks.

The authors can play with numbers killed in Iraq til he** freezes over, it doesn't change the fact that outrages numbers of veterans have become sick and died as a result of exposures to depleted uranium and chemicals from their term in the region.

Naturally, a small percentage of these soldiers would die from various causes at home separate from these battlefield exposures; but, remember these people were fit, strong and ready to due their duty before they left the USA. They came home sick and got sicker. And the numbers will only increase as long as the military establishment allows the use of DU weapons and maintains troops in Iraq (and Afganastan). These regions have hot spots of contamination that will continue to inflict severe genetic damage and disease for centuries.

These numbers are a quote from retired Major Doug Rokke, USA taken from the Gulf War Veterans Compensation Statistics Report of May 30, 2006.
 

Judith

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Not to belittle deaths in Iraq. Each life is highly valued but this war has cost us very little in the way of man power. Reference casualties per DAY in World War II. The Second World War subjected humanity to the greatest loss of life in history. Representing the apex of "total war", World War II witnessed the destruction of entire cities, millions of civilian and military casualties, and horrific atrocities. Learn more about the greatest conflict in history here: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii19391945/index.htm

Again the lost of life in Iraq is tragic, I am not downplaying it. But our troops know why they are there and they are proud to serve and protect.
 

memanpa

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The authors of this article write about deaths while serving in Iraq. They fail to acknowledge the deaths and disabilities which have occurred once returned to America.

After the first Gulf War, over 265,433 veterans/soldiers applied to Veterans Affairs for permanent disability and medical care, for life.


As of the time May 30, 2006 - inclusive of the time from August 1990 to May 30, 2006 383,913 veterans/soldiers have applied for permanent disability and permanent medical care.

doesn't seem excessive to me considering the fact that as a veteran they have earned the right to apply and recieve benefits, but what you do not state is how many that appiled was for permanent disability? or how many actually recieved disability, or what percent of disability was awarded,,

Of the total deployed since August of 1990, amounting to 1,129,340
only 943,000 are still alive. This means 186, 340 of America's sons and daughters who served in either GWI and/or GWII have DIED since the initial attacks.

and what is the cause of all these deaths just because they have passed on does not mean they all were service related as you try to imply

The authors can play with numbers killed in Iraq til he** freezes over, it doesn't change the fact

remember KRAZY KATHY you said it they can play with numbers:D :D :D
so are you playing with numbers? , better go back to playing with blocks, or won't they let you have them in your padded cell :shock:
 

jigs

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the wacko liberals are right , in fact all deaths are unjust. I propose we destroy all motorized vehicles in this country. they kill far more people than we have lost in the Iraq war, yet no one is doing anything about this!!! it is a travesty that we ignore such a signifigant loss of life, as those the cars take every year! we gotta get out of the auto business. crush all the cars in this country

see, I can play Kathys game.
 

Kathy

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Naturally, a small percentage of these soldiers would die from various causes at home separate from these battlefield exposures

I did say that some of the soldiers were dying of unrelated battlefield causes.

The problem with DU exposure is that the USA military tells the soldiers it's safe. It's not! The urine tests are usually taken weeks after exposure and are not reflective of the amounts they were exposed to - so again VA tells them their levels are acceptable. The USA military does not acknowledge the effects of DU contamination; soldiers who become sick have to fight for disability and prove the DU caused their sickness. This requires them first understanding their illness may be the result of the exposure, then researching it, finding organizations like Gulf War Veterans Association and putting together their case. Not an easy job when your very sick.

People know that driving is dangerous. Soldiers have been lied to that this stuff is not going to hurt them. Tell that to their widows, children, parents and deformed children.

All you have to do is a little research and reading and you'd find out the rules of the game are bogus.

This is a game to you. If you're so gung ho about the war, enlist and get your butt over to Iraq.
 

memanpa

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KRAZY KATHY
believe me if i could re enlist i would, something to do with some wounds I recieved in NAM prevent me from doing so, even so i support the military 100% unlike you who can only spout off about garbage!!!
once again what percentages of deaths are related to the wars?
what perceent of those seeking disability recieved 100%?

my dear mis informed KATHY i still carry bits and pieces of steel in my body from sharpnel recied in nam enough so i set off athe metal detector at airports etc. occasionally one of those pieces will work its way to the surface and fester enough it can be removed!!
so tell me to get off my bitt and go fight!! let me please please!!!!!!!!
i would willing do so again :D
 

Steve

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If you're so gung ho about the war, enlist and get your butt over to Iraq.

been there.....

By the way Kathy,...How many disabled Vets do you know?

I know quite a few, and I often give advice about disability claims.....Heck I am even a disabled vet,...actually make that a Gulf war disabled vet.....I know the facts.....why because I live them.....I was approved for benifits ...I was "represented" by the DAV...and so can any vet.....it is a fine organization, I am a life time member...and they will help you even if you are not a member...

in fact my e-mail is posted.....give it to every Vet you know, I will take the time to help them.
 

jigs

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no Kathy, it is not a game, but the point I was driving at is pretty simple to figure out, yet you blew right past it.....you are too driven to be anti Bush, that you forgot to be pro American.

that is what I do not agree with in your head in the sand propaganda tirades
 

Southdakotahunter

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Why does The sky is falling Kathy care about this? Your Canadian......You have no horse in this race.....How many troops has Canada sent or has deployed in this war on terror anyway? Would be nice to know so someday i can thank a Canadian serviceman for keeping me free and safe...............thanks to all that serve/served!
 

Mrs.Greg

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Southdakotahunter said:
Why does The sky is falling Kathy care about this? Your Canadian......You have no horse in this race.....How many troops has Canada sent or has deployed in this war on terror anyway? Would be nice to know so someday i can thank a Canadian serviceman for keeping me free and safe...............thanks to all that serve/served!
If I remember correctlySDH,we lost soldiers a couple weeks ago to friendly fire...a sad accident,second friendly fire accident as a matter of fact.So yes sir there are Canadians serving and fighting the war on terrorism,search Broke Cowboys threads,he explains Canadian Military better then anyone I know on here.
As for Kathy I've made it clear,she does not speak for Canada and esp. Alberta,Albertans have from the very beginning supported our troops,your troops and the war against terrorism.I couldn't begin to tell you how many troops we have deployed,but I do know there are alot :)
 

IL Rancher

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Lots of good Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan... Lots have paid the ultimate price for freedom over there as well. Canada is a good neighbor to have.
 

Steve

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I couldn't begin to tell you how many troops we have deployed,


"On September 12, 2001, the North Atlantic Council for the first time invoked Article 5 of the Washington Treaty. This pledge of collective defence requires NATO members to assist in responding to any armed attack on another ally in Europe or North America. Several NATO members—including Canada—pledged direct military support to the campaign against terrorism shortly thereafter."

"Following condemnation of the terror attacks by the UN Security Council, Canada announced that it would contribute air, land and sea forces to the international campaign against terrorism through."

"Canada contributed 16 of its 18 major warships to the coalition fleet in the Arabian Gulf-Arabian Sea area."

"Another demonstration of Canada's commitment to its coalition allies was its support of the U.S.-led operation Enduring Freedom, the U.S.-led international coalition in the campaign against terrorism. Canada deployed a battle group to Kandahar under this operation."

By a conservative count, Canada has maintained a combat force in excess of 2000 troops since Sept 12, 2001. in Afganastan...

" Among NATO states, Canada is one of the top contributors. "

Thank You!
 

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