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Northern Rancher

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Took the purdy blue stud home today-just found out he's a half brother to 'Big Deal' BB horse of the year. Was looking through Dusty's young broncs when he showed me this young fella-hopefully coming next spring to some mares near me lol.

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Northern Rancher

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He's double bred Major so he should buck-I can't thank Dusty enough for giving us a chance to use these studs-can't wait for those first colts to come off the blue roan-I didn't realize how many U.S contractors are packing broncs bred up here-alot of them for sure
 

Chuckie

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this is kinda sideways to the subject, but there's enough of you really good horse people on here to help me out: i am the WORST when it comes to looking at a yearling and imagining what it'll look like grown. they're always too long, too tall, too short, out of proportion--they drive me nuts!!!!!

i don't usually buy colts, but this subject has been aggravating me for years--i probably should've started a new post, but i'm too lazy to move this (if i knew how :roll: ). i'd like some input just out of curiosity and because i'm not too old to learn something (i hope... :cry: )
 
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Anonymous

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Chuckie said:
this is kinda sideways to the subject, but there's enough of you really good horse people on here to help me out: i am the WORST when it comes to looking at a yearling and imagining what it'll look like grown. they're always too long, too tall, too short, out of proportion--they drive me nuts!!!!!

i don't usually buy colts, but this subject has been aggravating me for years--i probably should've started a new post, but i'm too lazy to move this (if i knew how :roll: ). i'd like some input just out of curiosity and because i'm not too old to learn something (i hope... :cry: )

Chuckie- Its tough to tell when they are a weanling or yearling--about all you can get is an idea of how big boned they will be...Best bet is if you can look at the Dam and Sire and/or some siblings or half siblings...I can usually tell you how big they will be from knowing the past history of the parents....
 

Chuckie

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ok, that's fine--the mare's there, but not the stud, no pics, and you have one of those godarned yearlins'?? what do you look for? they drive me nuts!!!!

i can get the bone, the head's easy, but that doesn't matter much in the long run because they are SO out of proportion--half the time they look like mules :!:

so-what do y'all look for in a yearlin' , and what do you all look for in a yearlin'?? :???:
 

Chuckie

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well, i just don't THINK so. :shock: how about a hard-bellied guy? :wink: that MIGHT do it, but from what i've learned what i need is a good wife, and i'm the wrong sex to marry a wife, so what do i do :???:

at any rate, youngsters (as in horses, lest someone take this wrong :wink: ), drive me nuts, and i think you all are right--get an eye on dam/sire.

but what if you're at a sale ?????? (bet i getcha on that--or you guys'll say 'don't buy what you can't afford to lose'), which brings me back to the first ?: how do you judge a weanling/yearling when no parents are present?

so there..
 

PPRM

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Chuckie,


Several things,


I'd say to develop an eye, watch a lot of yearlings grow out....Be they nieghbors or what have you....Also watch what they are fed up to when first see them and compare....feeding has a lot of influence...

Second thing, look at a lot of liked age horses. Look at how bakanced they are relative to the rest of thier bidy. Compare thier bady against the other horses of similar age. I will say it seems to me that the ones with big butts at 12 months have the same at 3 and 5 years. The shorter cutting horses at 12 months will be the shorter 5 year olds to. Helps to know what pedigrees tend to through.

But balance at a young age tells me as much as anything,


My question would be why buy a yearling???? There's a ton of ready to start 2-3 year olds that you can tell more on for about the same price. Cheapest horse in the world is a 3 year old that needs rode,


Good luck,


PPRM
 

Chuckie

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pprm--you said a mouthful there. and i think you're right on the 3-yr old deal. but i can't help it: the weanling/yearling year DRIVES ME NUTS. these guys are SO out of proportion. i doubt i'll ever buy another youngster, but who knows?

just another one of my pet peeves--they should just skip the adolescent phase and be grown-ups (make it easier on the mom, ie, ME). oops--changing subject (i have teenager blues :? )....
 

RRoss

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Chuckie~If the pedigree means anything to you, it will tell you alot in what they will turn out like. If the pedigree is not real strong top and bottom leave it alone and save your money.
 

Chuckie

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i'm evidently not being real clear here.

i ask the question as a general question, ie, there's a theory on how horses should be proportioned using a triangle to determine how close they are to "perfection".

but if a person went to a sale, there are (i think they call them) "free-running" (unbroke) horses, you know nothing about them, they're yearlings, they're all over the place proportionally, what do you look for? or is there any way to really look at a yearling and know what they'll be like as grown-ups?

remember--the crucial point here is, you know nothing about them other than maybe the dam was registered, or the sire was registered, or maybe nothing at all (BLM colts, for example).

come on OT, FH, Soap, etc, etc--educate me here--it's gonna be a LONG old winter... :)
 
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Chuckie said:
but if a person went to a sale, there are (i think they call them) "free-running" (unbroke) horses, you know nothing about them, they're yearlings, they're all over the place proportionally, what do you look for? or is there any way to really look at a yearling and know what they'll be like as grown-ups?

Too many good bred horses with pedigrees, performance and/or family history out there for me to even look at those "run thrus"....I haven't bought a horse that I didn't have a good background to decide from for over 40 years...
 

Soapweed

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Doc Harris would probably say you need to buy a nice looking young horse with good EPDs. :wink:

It depends on what you want the finished product of the grown horse to be. A small yearling will undoubtedly be a small horse when full grown. A rat-tailed Appaloosa youngster will be a rat-tailed full grown horse also, but you could always buy a fake long tail. :wink: If you want a cowhorse, buy a young colt with cutting horse bloodlines.

Many times a yearling is a better buy than a weanling. The weanlings still carry bloom and baby fat thanks to their momma's milk. Yearlings sometimes look rougher, but they are one year closer to becoming a mature saddle horse. I agree with PPRM that "the cheapest horse in the world is a 3 year old that needs rode." That is an apt obseration, and many times there are bargains to be had by getting a young started horse that is tractable and just needs some miles. You can "finish" the horse to your own specifications.
 

Northern Rancher

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I've never bought many horses always prefered to raise my own-always had pretty good horses to ride too.Some of those cutting bred horses are a bit small for our country in fact alot of guys ride horses with a shot of draft back in them somewhere.
 

Northern Rancher

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I've never bought many horses always prefered to raise my own-always had pretty good horses to ride too.Some of those cutting bred horses are a bit small for our country in fact alot of guys ride horses with a shot of draft back in them somewhere. You get gathering those big bush meadows with lots of soft ground you need some pony under you-or you end up with some on top of you-never any fun lol.
 

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