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Wal-Mart facts for Sandhusker only

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agman

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I apoligize for the length of this artilce but it is necessary to dispell the many myths that permeate the countryside. I am certain most readers will appreciate the FACTS that follow. agman

Wal-Mart supports communities financially and provides hundreds of jobs. Our property taxes, sales tax revenue and community giving help fund basic services like police and fire departments and schools, and support for invaluable charities. The typical Supercenter raises or gives $30,000 to $50,000 a year to local charitable needs ranging from youth programs to literacy councils. In fact, Wal-Mart is the largest corporate cash contributor in America. In fiscal year ending 2005, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and the Wal-Mart & SAM'S CLUB Foundation contributed more than $170 million to support communities and local non-profit organizations. More than 90 percent of cash donations from Wal-Mart Stores and the Wal-Mart & SAM'S CLUB Foundation target local communities. That’s $18,000 an hour or $5 a second. Last year, Wal-Mart collected $10.2 billion in state and local sales taxes and paid millions in property taxes.

A UBS Warburg study found that Wal-Mart grocery prices are 17 to 20 percent lower than other supermarkets, which has the greatest benefit for a community’s low-income families. According to a study done by the Los Angeles Economic Development Council, Wal-Mart potentially saves individual families more than $500 a year. This is money that can be used to buy food, gas or any other priorities for that family.

Studies show that new businesses spring up near Wal-Marts and existing stores flourish as they take advantage of the increased customer flow to and from our stores. Drive by any Wal-Mart store and count the number of businesses operating nearby, many are independent local businesses or locally owned franchises. The most definitive look at this issue, by Dr. Emek Basker at the University of Missouri, showed average increases of 50 retail jobs in communities five years after the entry of Wal-Mart.

Employment:
More than 1.2 million Associates work at Wal-Mart in the U.S. Seventy-four percent of Wal-Mart's hourly store associates in the U.S. work full-time. That's well above the 20 - 40 percent typically found in the retail industry. We are a leading employer of Hispanic Americans, with more than 128,000 Hispanic associates. Wal-Mart is one of the leading employers of African Americans, with more than 206,000 African-American associates. More than 220,000 of our associates are 55 or older. We project we will create positions for more than 100,000 new jobs in 2005.

Our health care plan insures full-time and part-time associates once eligible. Last year, this was more than 500,000 associates, including many family members. Currently, 86 percent of Wal-Mart hourly store associates surveyed have medical insurance - 56 percent of those with coverage received health care insurance from Wal-Mart and the remainder receive health care through another source such as another employer, a family member, the military or Medicare. Unlike many plans, after the first year, the Wal-Mart medical plan has no lifetime maximum for most expenses, protecting our associates against catastrophic loss and financial ruin.

Associates enrolled in the Associates’ Medical Plan also have access to world class health care at the Mayo Clinic, Stanford University Hospital, Johns Hopkins University Hospital and many other health care facilities, all without insurance

Wages:
Currently, 74 percent of Wal-Mart’s hourly store associates in the United States work full-time. That is well above the 20 - 40 percent typically found in the retail industry. Our average hourly wage for regular full-time associates in the U.S. is $9.68 an hour, almost double the federal minimum wage. Wal-Mart’s average full-time wage in urban areas is slightly higher than the national average. For example: Chicago, $10.69; Austin, TX, $10.69; Washington D.C./Baltimore, $10.08; Atlanta, $10.80; and in Los Angeles, $9.99.

China Imports:
Wal-Mart estimates that we purchased about $18 billion from China last year -- about $9 billion imported from direct sources and about $9 billion from indirect sources -- compared to $137.5 billion spent last year with all kinds of suppliers in the U.S.

Wal-Mart buys merchandise and services from more than 68,000 U.S suppliers and supports over 3.5 million supplier jobs in the United States. In fiscal year ending 2004, Wal-Mart spent over $137.5 billon with suppliers in the U.S. We buy billions of dollars worth of goods in the United States, from large suppliers and from “mom and pops,” including small farmers, and minority and women-owned businesses. Many Wal-Mart Stores participate in our “Store of the Community,” which showcases local products from local producers. We buy apples in Washington, pumpkins in Illinois, bacon in Minnesota, barbecue in Missouri, and many other products from every corner of the country.

As Wal-Mart’s U.S. customer base continues to grow in diversity and as we expand our retail stores internationally, we must offer a mix of products to these customers around the world. We source from the global market to offer our customers who live paycheck to paycheck the greatest value for their money on many essential products. To do this, we buy, in addition to the U.S., from many regions, such as Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

Nebraska only:

In Nebraska, the total number of Wal-Mart associates is 9,659 (as of 10/15/04)..
The average wage for regular full-time hourly associates in Nebraska is $9.73 per hour (Wal-Mart Discount Stores, Supercenters and Neighborhood Markets). Additionally, associates are eligible for performance-based bonuses.
In recent years, Wal-Mart has contributed four percent of an associate's eligible pay to their combined Profit Sharing and 401(k) Plan.
Suppliers
During the past year, Wal-Mart spent $235,251,442 for merchandise and services with 697 suppliers in the state of Nebraska. As a result of Wal-Mart's relationship with these suppliers, Wal-Mart supports 36,665 supplier jobs in the state of Nebraska.
Supplier figures provided by Dun & Bradstreet

Taxes and Fees
Wal-Mart collected on behalf of the state of Nebraska more than $66.1 million in sales taxes last year.
Wal-Mart paid more than $5.9 million in state and local taxes in the state of Nebraska last year.
Community Involvement
During the past year, Wal-Mart Stores and SAM'S CLUBS contributed $1,176,279 to local causes and organizations in the communities they serve in the state of Nebraska, and raised an additional $420,311, for a grand total of $1,596,590.

BTW Sandhsuker you never did tell me how many beans were in the can?!!! I expect your information regarding that issuse is about as inaccurate as your many other views. As far as the trade deficit I will do a new post. Have a grat day.
 

Sandhusker

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I've got numbers for you as well. If I don't post right away, I'm not ducking.
 

Mike

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Both sides of the Wal-Mart story from "Business Week":

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/03_40/b3852001_mz001.htm
 

agman

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Mike said:
Both sides of the Wal-Mart story from "Business Week":

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/03_40/b3852001_mz001.htm

Resposne... There several article regarding Wal-Mart over various issues. Most are positive toward the impact on the overall economy. Even in the article you cite they make little comparative analysis. That is kinda like saying they pay only $6.25 wage to a starter plus benefits while the local mom and pop shop only pays $5.00 per hour and no benefits. That is the real story.
 

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Some reading for now. Notice how much taxpayers are mentioned. It appears there is a cost for our "savings".

More later.

A Harvard Business School case study on Wal-Mart found that, in 2002, Wal-Mart spent an average of $3,500 per employee. By comparison, the average spending per employee in the wholesale/retailing sector was $4,800. For U.S. employers in general, the average was $5,600 per employee.47 In the end, because they cannot afford the company health plan, many Wal-Mart workers must turn to public assistance for health care or forego their health care needs altogether. Effectively, Wal-Mart forces taxpayers to subsidize what should be a company-funded health plan. According to a study by the Institute for Labor and Employment at the University of California-Berkeley, California taxpayers subsidized $20.5 million worth of medical care for Wal-Mart in that state alone.48 In fact, Wal-Mart personnel offices, knowing employees cannot afford the company health plan, actually encourage employees to apply for charitable and public assistance, according to a recent report by the PBS news program Now With Bill Moyers.49 When a giant like Wal-Mart shifts health insurance costs to employees, its competitors invariably come under pressure to do the same. Wal-Mart has sparked a new race to the bottom among American retail employers. Undeniably, such a race threatens to undermine the employer-based health insurance system. LOW WAGES MEAN HIGH COSTS TO TAXPAYERS Because Wal-Mart wages are generally not living wages, the company uses taxpayers to subsidize its labor costs. While the California study showed how much taxpayers were subsidizing Wal-Mart on health care alone, the total costs to taxpayers for Wal-Mart’s labor policies are much greater.

The Democratic Staff of the Committee on Education and the Workforce estimates that one 200-person Wal-Mart store may result in a cost to federal taxpayers of $420,750 per year – about $2,103 per employee. Specifically, the low wages result in the following additional public costs being passed along to taxpayers: • $36,000 a year for free and reduced lunches for just 50 qualifying Wal-Mart families. • $42,000 a year for Section 8 housing assistance, assuming 3 percent of the store employees qualify for such assistance, at $6,700 per family. • $125,000 a year for federal tax credits and deductions for low-income families, assuming 50 employees are heads of household with a child and 50 are married with two children. • $100,000 a year for the additional Title I expenses, assuming 50 Wal-Mart families qualify with an average of 2 children. • $108,000 a year for the additional federal health care costs of moving into state children’s health insurance programs (S-CHIP), assuming 30 employees with an average of two children qualify. • $9,750 a year for the additional costs for low income energy assistance. Among Wal-Mart employees, some single workers may be able to make ends meet. Others may be forced to take on two or three jobs. Others may have a spouse with a better job. And others simply cannot make ends meet. Because Wal-Mart fails to pay sufficient wages, U.S. taxpayers are forced to pick up the tab. In this sense, Wal-Mart’s profits are not made only on the backs of its employees – but on the backs of every U.S. taxpayer. The ultimate costs are not limited to subsidies for underpaid Wal-Mart workers. When a Wal-Mart comes to town, the new competition has a ripple effect throughout the community. Other stores are forced out of business or forced to cut employees’ wages and benefits in order to compete with Wal-Mart. The Los Angeles City Council commissioned a report in 2003 on the effects of allowing Wal-Mart Supercenters into their communities. The report, prepared by consulting firm Rodino and Associates, found that Supercenters drive down wages in the local retail industry, place a strain on public services, and damage small businesses. It recommended that the City Council refuse to allow any Supercenters to be built in Los Angeles without a promise from Wal-Mart to increase wages and benefits for its employees.51 The findings of the Rodino report are alarming. The labor impacts of a Wal-Mart Supercenter on low-income communities include: • “Big box retailers and superstores may negatively impact the labor market in an area by the conversion of higher paying retail jobs to a fewer number of lower paying retail jobs. The difference in overall compensation (wages and benefits) may be as much as $8.00.” • “Lack of health care benefits of many big box and superstore employees can result in a greater public financial burden as workers utilize emergency rooms as a major component of their health care.” •

“In 1995, Wal-Mart claimed only 6 percent of its merchandise was imported. Today an estimated 50-60 percent of its products come from overseas.71 In the past five years, Wal-Mart has doubled its imports from China. In 2002, the company bought 14 percent of the $1.9 billion of clothes exported by Bangladesh to the United States. Also in 2002, the company purchased $12 billion in merchandise from China, or 10 percent of China’s total U.S.-bound exports, a 20 percent increase from the previous year. In 2003, these Chinese purchases jumped to $15 billion, or almost one-eighth of all Chinese exports to the United States.72 Today, more than 3,000 supplier factories in China produce for Wal-Mart.73 Wal-Mart maintains an extensive global network of 10,000 suppliers.74 Whether American, Bangladeshi, Chinese, or Honduran, Wal-Mart plays these producers against one another in search of lower and lower prices. American suppliers have been forced to relocate their businesses overseas to maintain Wal-Mart contracts.75 Overseas manufacturers are forced to engage in cutthroat competition that further erodes wages and working conditions of what often already are sweatshops. To keep up with the pressure to produce ever cheaper goods, factories force employees to work overtime or work for weeks without a day off. A Bangladeshi factory worker told the Los Angeles Times that employees at her factory worked from 8 a.m. to 3 a.m. for 10 and 15 day stretches just to meet Wal-Mart price demands.
 

koj

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Excellent post. I don't see much arguement. Facts (not taken out of context) tell the tale. I think that is the problem with a lot of posters on this site, they use facts, but only partial facts. Keep it coming.
 

Jason

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koj said:
Excellent post. I don't see much arguement. Facts (not taken out of context) tell the tale. I think that is the problem with a lot of posters on this site, they use facts, but only partial facts. Keep it coming.

Agman's post is indeed excellent. It quotes many studies from reliable sources.

Sandblamer's post is full of the word assuming, and we all know what happens when you assume.

Agman, with all due respect, could I ask you a hypothetical question here?

Would you want your children to work for a supplier of goods for Wal-Mart?

Wal-mart supports 3.5 million supplier jobs in the US. Chances are all Americans already know someone who works for a Wal-mart supplier.
 

Cal

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Faster horses said:
Agman, with all due respect, could I ask you a hypothetical question here?

Would you want your children to work for a supplier of goods for Wal-Mart?

Aren't we already suppliers of the meat counter?
 

Itrap4u

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Faster horses wrote: do you want your childern working for a wal mart supplier!
Faster horses lets see, do you know anyone who works for: Procter and Gamble? Wrangler jeans, hanes, fruit of the loom, Nabisco, General Mills,charmin,tide,goodyear tire,Berkley fishing tackle,remington,winchester,Mossy Oak, Primos calls,Real tree, woolrich, coca cola,pepsi, frito lay, blue bunny ice cream, quaker state,pennzoil, and the list goes on, if you do guess what? there a wal mart supplier, and I can tell you alot of these companys without wal mart would have massive gross sales losses and people laid off.
I knew a lady that worked for a place at 9.00 pr hr for 12 years in a small town, and they did nothing but combo packing for Wal mart stores, if you bought a bottle of scope mouthwash and it came with a free tooth brush, she and others shrink wrapped the toothbrush to the bottles, without wal mart they would have been all out of a job. They did many different promos that are Wal Mart exclusives, so they employe more than just the people in the store.
 

agman

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Sandhusker said:
Some reading for now. Notice how much taxpayers are mentioned. It appears there is a cost for our "savings".

Response...The result, Wal-mart continues to grow, the U.S. economy continues to grow and people like yourself only focus on the negatives while missing the bigger issue. I can find a negative article on virtually any subject. A different analysis using the same data can draw a far different conclusion.

The simple fact is if Wal-mart does not treat their employees or customers fairly they would go the way of the dinosaur. Are 100 million shoppers a month wrong or is your view wrong? Was rural America not in decline before Wal-Mart's existence? What was the cause then if Wal-mart is the cause for decline now? These are basic questions to address the big picture which shows the folly of your negative and false arguments.

The same holds true for your phony trade deficit view. In all but five of the last 45 years the U.S has posted a trade deficit. During that period the U.S. economy has added $8.4 trillion in GDP while creating 78.5 million new jobs and added $26,200 in per capita disposable income. All the while people such as yourself have been crying "wolf". We are all blessed that only the few misinformed listen to your cry. You fail to realize the deficit is a result of a strong and growing economy. Would you care to check the job and economic growth rates in some trade surplus countries? The other side of the trade deficit is: in the last five years or so the U.S. has attracted $100 billion more a year than it needs to finance it's trade deficit. What a crisis!!!!!
 

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Faster horses said:
Agman, with all due respect, could I ask you a hypothetical question here?

Would you want your children to work for a supplier of goods for Wal-Mart?

Respose... Why not-I don't care if they dig ditches. If that is what they choose. I just want them to dig faster and deeper than the next guy. That is where satisfaction and prosperity is. As competitive as they are they don't need any additional encouragement from dad!!!

As a rancher I expect you have a substantial net worth which you have accumulated over MANY years of service. There are many Wal-Mart employees adn suppliers who have accomplished the same by starting at the bottom and working up the ladder. So to answer your question; if either of my children choose to work for Wal-Mart I would just encourage them to out work the next person. Remember, Wal-mart is not union so hard work is recognized and still rewarded. Remember, they develop their management expertise internally. Have a great day.
 

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agman said:
Sandhusker said:
Some reading for now. Notice how much taxpayers are mentioned. It appears there is a cost for our "savings".

Response...The result, Wal-mart continues to grow, the U.S. economy continues to grow and people like yourself only focus on the negatives while missing the bigger issue. I can find a negative article on virtually any subject. A different analysis using the same data can draw a far different conclusion.

The simple fact is if Wal-mart does not treat their employees or customers fairly they would go the way of the dinosaur. Are 100 million shoppers a month wrong or is your view wrong? Was rural America not in decline before Wal-Mart's existence? What was the cause then if Wal-mart is the cause for decline now? These are basic questions to address the big picture which shows the folly of your negative and false arguments.

The same holds true for your phony trade deficit view. In all but five of the last 45 years the U.S has posted a trade deficit. During that period the U.S. economy has added $8.4 trillion in GDP while creating 78.5 million new jobs and added $26,200 in per capita disposable income. All the while people such as yourself have been crying "wolf". We are all blessed that only the few misinformed listen to your cry. You fail to realize the deficit is a result of a strong and growing economy. Would you care to check the job and economic growth rates in some trade surplus countries? The other side of the trade deficit is: in the last five years or so the U.S. has attracted $100 billion more a year than it needs to finance it's trade deficit. What a crisis!!!!!

You want to tell me how the burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense, too?
 

Jason

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agman said:
Wages:
Currently, 74 percent of Wal-Mart’s hourly store associates in the United States work full-time. That is well above the 20 - 40 percent typically found in the retail industry. Our average hourly wage for regular full-time associates in the U.S. is $9.68 an hour, almost double the federal minimum wage. Wal-Mart’s average full-time wage in urban areas is slightly higher than the national average. For example: Chicago, $10.69; Austin, TX, $10.69; Washington D.C./Baltimore, $10.08; Atlanta, $10.80; and in Los Angeles, $9.99.
sandblamer said:
You want to tell me how the burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense, too?

Slightly above average wages is a real burden!?!. Imagine what kind of a burden greatly above average wages would bring!!!.
 

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Myths and Reality


Myth: Wal-Mart creates "hundreds" of new jobs for communities.
Fact: Studies show that for every two jobs created by a Wal-Mart store, the community loses three. Jobs that are retained by a community are merely shifted from local businesses to the giant retailer. In a 1994 report, the Congressional Research Service warned Congress that communities need to evaluate the significance of any job gains at big-box stores against any loss of jobs due to reduced business at competing retailers. The report also pointed out that these so-called new jobs "provide significantly lower wages then jobs in many industries, and are often only part-time positions, seasonal opportunities, or subject to extensive turnover." The Real Story is that when Wal-Mart moves into the neighborhood, it devours local businesses and lowers community living standards.

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Myth: Wal-Mart has "always low prices, always."
Fact: The local newspaper in Carroll County, Arkansas conducted a test of Wal-Mart's low price claim. Surveying a list of 19 common household items at six Wal-Mart stores over a one month period, the newspaper staff found that Wal-Mart was cheapest on only two of the items . The lowest register receipt for all 19 items was $12.91. The highest total for all items came from Wal-Mart at $15.86. The Real Story is the high cost of Wal-Mart's prices: lower wages, more imports, lost U.S. jobs, lower community living standards.

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Myth: Wal-Mart's presence in a community generates tax revenues.
Fact: Studies conducted by small towns on the impact of proposed Wal-Mart stores have shown that tax revenue reductions are more likely to occur after a Wal-Mart moves into an area.
A Maryland study showed that in the years following the arrival of Wal-Mart, "town tax receipts from personal property and ordinary business corporation taxes grew but at a declining rate." The study said that "the expected growth in income taxes may have been offset by low-wage jobs offered by the large retailer and by the loss of employment in competing businesses. . . ."


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Myth: Wal-Mart's workers receive good health benefits.
Fact: Wal-Mart's Health Coverage Leaves Most Workers Uncovered.

Huge employee premium payments and big deductibles keep participation in Wal-Mart's health plan to 38% of employees. That's 6 out of every 10 employees--more than 425,000 Wal-Mart employees, most of them women, who have no company provided health coverage. Nationally, more than 60% of workers are covered by company paid health plans. There's more: Wal-Mart workers pay insurance premiums that cover close to half of Wal-Mart's health plan expenses. The national average shows that employee premiums cover just over 25% of health plan expenses incurred by companies nationwide. The Real Story is that Wal-Mart freely acknowledges shifting its health care costs to taxpayers and responsible employers. A company spokesperson said, "[Wal-Mart employees] who choose not to participate in [Wal-Mart's health plan] usually get their health-care benefits from a spouse or the state or federal government." Wal-Mart is the biggest beneficiary of its health plan because the company shifts $1 billion in health care costs to the government and responsible employers.


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Myth: Wal-Mart "Buys American" and Wal-Mart "Brings it Home to the USA."
Fact: Two 1998 studies that surveyed clothing on Wal-Mart store racks and shelves found 80% and sometimes more thatn 9o% of the apparel items were produced overseas, many in countries where sweatshops and child labor are prevelant.
"The truth is," says the National Labor Committee, "Wal-Mart has moved far more production offshore than the industry average." There's more: Commenting on Wal-Mart's "Buy Mexican" program, an expert on economic nationalism said Wal-Mart is ". . .shamelessly manipulating nationalist sentiments in both countries. . . . For all its public nationalism, Wal-mart is reinvesting its all-American dollars overseas."


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Sandhusker

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A little more

http://www.pbs.org/now/transcript/transcript_walmart.html

You could plant a lot of potatos on all the dirt on Walmart.
 

Sandhusker

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Jason said:
agman said:
Wages:
Currently, 74 percent of Wal-Mart’s hourly store associates in the United States work full-time. That is well above the 20 - 40 percent typically found in the retail industry. Our average hourly wage for regular full-time associates in the U.S. is $9.68 an hour, almost double the federal minimum wage. Wal-Mart’s average full-time wage in urban areas is slightly higher than the national average. For example: Chicago, $10.69; Austin, TX, $10.69; Washington D.C./Baltimore, $10.08; Atlanta, $10.80; and in Los Angeles, $9.99.
sandblamer said:
You want to tell me how the burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense, too?

Slightly above average wages is a real burden!?!. Imagine what kind of a burden greatly above average wages would bring!!!.

Jason Ol Buddy,
Would you like to tell all of us how many hours worked Walmart considers full time?
 

agman

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Sandhusker said:
agman said:
Sandhusker said:
Some reading for now. Notice how much taxpayers are mentioned. It appears there is a cost for our "savings".

Response...The result, Wal-mart continues to grow, the U.S. economy continues to grow and people like yourself only focus on the negatives while missing the bigger issue. I can find a negative article on virtually any subject. A different analysis using the same data can draw a far different conclusion.

The simple fact is if Wal-mart does not treat their employees or customers fairly they would go the way of the dinosaur. Are 100 million shoppers a month wrong or is your view wrong? Was rural America not in decline before Wal-Mart's existence? What was the cause then if Wal-mart is the cause for decline now? These are basic questions to address the big picture which shows the folly of your negative and false arguments.

The same holds true for your phony trade deficit view. In all but five of the last 45 years the U.S has posted a trade deficit. During that period the U.S. economy has added $8.4 trillion in GDP while creating 78.5 million new jobs and added $26,200 in per capita disposable income. All the while people such as yourself have been crying "wolf". We are all blessed that only the few misinformed listen to your cry. You fail to realize the deficit is a result of a strong and growing economy. Would you care to check the job and economic growth rates in some trade surplus countries? The other side of the trade deficit is: in the last five years or so the U.S. has attracted $100 billion more a year than it needs to finance it's trade deficit. What a crisis!!!!!

You want to tell me how the burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense, too?

Response.. The burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense; there I told you. If that is all you got, and you could not back that argument, you just parroted another comment, you best go back to the drawing boards and start all over. Most economists in the fed attribute some of the reduction in inflation to Wal-Mart. What do you think that does to consumer's real income, their spending and taxes generated from that spending?
 

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Agman, "Response.. The burden on taxpayers caused by low wages is nonsense; there I told you. "

BULLSHIRT! I see tax returns on a near daily basis. Do you have any idea how much money a family of 4 has to make before they pay in? Do you realize there is a hell of a lot of folks who get tax refunds from the IRS and they NEVER PAID A DIME IN? I saw one just last week where they had combined income of over 28,000 (that would be an hourly wage of $13.66) - they never paid a red cent in, and got a check back for a little over $2800. This is not an isolated case - I see them all the time. WHERE DID THAT MONEY COME FROM, AGMAN?

My wife was once the secretary of the school system up here. I can tell you that there are many more kids receiving free or reduced school lunches than what are paying. WHERE DOES THAT MONEY COME FROM, AGMAN?

Do you want to talk about the unpaid emergency room visits from the uninsured who's costs end up getting shared by the government or those with insurance? WHERE DOES THAT MONEY COME FROM, AGMAN?

Don't give me that crap that low wages do not burden all of us one way or another. You save a buck at the Walmart checkout counter, and that buck gets refunded by the tax payers.
 

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