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what are round bales bring out there?

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eatbeef

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$60 for straw, $125 for grass, $180 for grinding alfalfa and 200 plus for good alfalfa and its only gonna get worse i think, because even though we could get some rains and put up some quality alfalfa the rest of the summer there isnt gonna be anything for tonnage to speak of.
 

littlejoe

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Larrry said:
Do you think CRP will help ease the situation?


I found this:
http://www.civisauction.com/image/jhr.pdf

i was on fsa board---always contended they should open crp up in the non-drought counties as well---
 

Red Barn Angus

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Around here we are seeing $140-$150 a ton for prairie hay, 50-60 for straw and I read $130 to 160 for soybean bales. Have never baled or fed soybean hay but it is sure tempting to try baling some.

Have started feeding hay here recently. Grass all burned up and ponds getting low. How about those guys who bought those $1,800 pairs last spring?
 

eatbeef

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Have never baled or fed soybean hay but it is sure tempting to try baling some.

Starting to look at that option here, beans are still green but no pods at all and i have heard of irrigated farmers saying that there are no pods yet. Looks like the best thing would be to windrow and chop the beans, but the cost of chopping around here seems to be outrageous.
 

eatbeef

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Do you think CRP will help ease the situation?

Not around here, because there isnt much of any CRP left and i have heard of some selling for $100 at ton.
 

Faster horses

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Conservation Reserve Program--through the government. I think it was
started in 1987 or 1988. It gets cussed and discussed....but the gov't
is phasing it out. The hunters loved it as it gave a great cover to game
birds, etc. It was not supposed to be used, but in drought years there
are programs so that it can be hayed or grazed after the nesting season.
Ranchers lose a % of their payment for using it. I think it is 25%, but
during droughts they cut it to 10% at times. You also can't use it all,
someone told me this year that you had to leave half; sometimes it has
been so you only leave 1/4.

I saw in the newspaper where they were offering it in Idaho to help
the pheasants as there has been a high number of pheasants lost due
to one thing or another. Anyway, the birds love it.
 

3 M L & C

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It's land that farmers own. The gov pay you per year to take it out of farming. Most are on like a 15 year contract around here. And you plant a mix of grass that they want you to. They are kind of phasing it out. Most if not all crp ground should not have been farmed in the first place. As it is usually rough ground with a lot of slope to it. Not very productive farm ground.
 

LazyWP

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Deeded land that land owners got paid to plant back to native grass. The problem is, without hoof action, and letting it stand for 10 years, you have all the fuel for a horrific fire, and most of the hay is JUNK too.
 

Hayguy

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3 M L & C said:
It's land that farmers own. The gov pay you per year to take it out of farming. Most are on like a 15 year contract around here. And you plant a mix of grass that they want you to. They are kind of phasing it out. Most if not all crp ground should not have been farmed in the first place. As it is usually rough ground with a lot of slope to it. Not very productive farm ground.

thanx, theres a lot of land everywhere that should have never been broke, but high grain prices influenced those decisions as they do now. does the farmer still pay land tax on these pieces? is he allowed to use it in any way?
 

Red Barn Angus

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It is deeded land. Back 25 years ago or so the govt thought it would be a good idea to take some of the more erodable land out of production. Back then we had surpluses and the payment they offered was as much or more than one could get farming it. Since then the payments have remained about the same or even less it isn't a good program at all financially. It did make possible the seeding down of land that should probably have never been plowed up. There are some nice meadows and pastures now that would have never been possible otherwise. The problem now is that the fickle government has decided they don't want to pay more and grain prices have gone up and the surpluses are gone so economically it isn't a very good deal. Much is being put back into crops as the contract expires. Politically they make a big deal of opening up the CRP land for haying but they only let you hay half the acres and then want 10% of their payment back so they are making a lot of talk and really helping very little. It seems to me the wildlife are more important to the govt than the food production made possible by the farmers and ranchers. Ok, guess you figured out my opinion!
 

Hayguy

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Red Barn Angus said:
It is deeded land. Back 25 years ago or so the govt thought it would be a good idea to take some of the more erodable land out of production. Back then we had surpluses and the payment they offered was as much or more than one could get farming it. Since then the payments have remained about the same or even less it isn't a good program at all financially. It did make possible the seeding down of land that should probably have never been plowed up. There are some nice meadows and pastures now that would have never been possible otherwise. The problem now is that the fickle government has decided they don't want to pay more and grain prices have gone up and the surpluses are gone so economically it isn't a very good deal. Much is being put back into crops as the contract expires. Politically they make a big deal of opening up the CRP land for haying but they only let you hay half the acres and then want 10% of their payment back so they are making a lot of talk and really helping very little. It seems to me the wildlife are more important to the govt than the food production made possible by the farmers and ranchers. Ok, guess you figured out my opinion!


and how do you REALLY feel :wink: :lol: :lol:

as with most gov't programs, not much common sense involved
 

Red Barn Angus

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Still have to pay land taxes on it. In fact, in Kansas, you pay more on crp land than you do on pasture or meadow. Kansas has the opinion that the crp land is more valuable as it has a fixed income each year.

No, you can't use it for anything and you do have to keep the trees and brush down. Most here burn it in the spring. And, yes, it makes a heck of a fire.
 

Faster horses

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Red Barn Angus said:
It is deeded land. Back 25 years ago or so the govt thought it would be a good idea to take some of the more erodable land out of production. Back then we had surpluses and the payment they offered was as much or more than one could get farming it. Since then the payments have remained about the same or even less it isn't a good program at all financially. It did make possible the seeding down of land that should probably have never been plowed up. There are some nice meadows and pastures now that would have never been possible otherwise. The problem now is that the fickle government has decided they don't want to pay more and grain prices have gone up and the surpluses are gone so economically it isn't a very good deal. Much is being put back into crops as the contract expires. Politically they make a big deal of opening up the CRP land for haying but they only let you hay half the acres and then want 10% of their payment back so they are making a lot of talk and really helping very little. It seems to me the wildlife are more important to the govt than the food production made possible by the farmers and ranchers. Ok, guess you figured out my opinion!

Great explanation!
Some farmers in Montana were about done for financially til this
program came along--good, bad or otherwise. :D
 

3 M L & C

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Faster horses said:
Red Barn Angus said:
It is deeded land. Back 25 years ago or so the govt thought it would be a good idea to take some of the more erodable land out of production. Back then we had surpluses and the payment they offered was as much or more than one could get farming it. Since then the payments have remained about the same or even less it isn't a good program at all financially. It did make possible the seeding down of land that should probably have never been plowed up. There are some nice meadows and pastures now that would have never been possible otherwise. The problem now is that the fickle government has decided they don't want to pay more and grain prices have gone up and the surpluses are gone so economically it isn't a very good deal. Much is being put back into crops as the contract expires. Politically they make a big deal of opening up the CRP land for haying but they only let you hay half the acres and then want 10% of their payment back so they are making a lot of talk and really helping very little. It seems to me the wildlife are more important to the govt than the food production made possible by the farmers and ranchers. Ok, guess you figured out my opinion!

Great explanation!
Some farmers in Montana were about done for financially til this
program came along--good, bad or otherwise. :D

What are the payment in Montana? Around here they are only around 35 dollars an acre. That dosn't go to far. My opinion you would be better off just using it as pasture. Even if it dosn't make that good of pasture here because of the grass they want you to plant. It's not native to this area. By the time you get the gov involved and have to follow their guidlines. It's a joke, then they come up with the idea that you have to "enhance" your crp by seeding two pounds an acre of alfalfa into red grass thats waist high. You might as well just drive around on the atv in the winter and throw it out by hand. The 10 percent payback is usually 25 or even 50 in most years, but they cut it back to 10 just for this year.
 

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