• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

What the Japanese are Reading- an Editorial

Help Support Ranchers.net:

A

Anonymous

Guest
asahi.com > ENGLISH > Opinion,Editorial
EDITORIAL/ How safe is U.S. beef?: U.S. testing system for BSE appears highly unreliable.
07/02/2005



A second case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has turned up in the United States, this time in a 12-year-old cow that was born in Texas. That in itself is not particularly surprising since many experts had predicted more cases of mad cow disease would be detected in the United States.

What is shocking, though, is that the DNA test results came out seven months after the first indication of possible BSE infection. In controlling BSE, it is imperative to quickly grasp the source and extent of infection. Whether the current U.S. testing system allows health officials to determine those criteria would appear to be extremely doubtful.

In Japan, the Food Safety Commission is discussing whether to resume U.S. beef imports after an 18-month hiatus. We urge the commission to hold thorough discussions on the effectiveness of the U.S. examination system.

When the infected animal was destroyed last November it was so wobbly, it could not even walk. It tested positive after a simple preliminary BSE test, but tested negative after a second test using a process called immunohistochemistry, or IHC, for conclusive proof. As a result, the cow was determined to be free of BSE.

The U.S. Agriculture Department's inspector-general questioned those findings, and in early June he ordered the USDA to conduct a more sensitive Western blot examination. The result was positive. A laboratory in Britain also provided confirmation.

In Japan and Europe, testing for BSE uses both the IHC and Western blot methods. If an animal tests positive in either instance, it is assumed to have the disease.

In the United States, both testing methods were used when the first case of BSE was suspected. However, for reasons that have not been explained, U.S. health officials stopped using the Western blot method. It was only in the current case that the USDA agreed to use both methods.

The USDA lab tested the animal tissue by using a newly revised version of the IHC method. Even though the animal tested positive, the results were withheld. Even if the revised exam method was only in the experimental stage, once it turned up a positive result, it should have been common sense to conduct further tests to make sure.

Perhaps the United States is trying hard not to uncover more cases of BSE. The turn of events makes us uneasy.

In Japan, BSE tests are done to locate infected animals and remove them from the distribution pipeline for eventual human consumption. In the United States, the testing is aimed at grasping the extent of the disease. As things now stand, we believe it would be difficult for U.S. officials to even ascertain whether a particular animal is infected or not.

During the past year, the USDA has tested 390,000 cows. Most of them could not walk. The number represents just 1 percent of the animals that were slaughtered for human consumption. So, if a seemingly healthy cow was infected, it would appear that it can easily be overlooked.

U.S. and Japanese health officials are now discussing resuming the beef trade using cattle that are less than 20 months old. The U.S. agriculture secretary was quick to point out that the latest case of BSE infection occurred in an animal that was 12 years old, and thus not eligible export to Japan.

The fact is, recent events have shaken our faith in the reliability of U.S. anti-BSE measures.

Ensuring that beef is safe to eat can only be maintained by a culmination of cautious steps to ascertain risk of infection, removing dangerous body parts, and controlling the quality of feed, et cetera.

How safe is U.S beef? As guardians of our food safety, the responsibilities of the Food Safety Commission continues to grow.

--The Asahi Shimbun, July 1(IHT/Asahi: July 2,2005)
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
In the United States, both testing methods were used when the first case of BSE was suspected.

However, for reasons that have not been explained, U.S. health officials stopped using the Western blot method.

It was only in the current case that the USDA agreed to use both methods.

Gee,I wonder if the anti bse test crowd ,Packers,Renders,NCBA,and USDA staff had reasons to not use the Western Blot TEST??????????
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
I wonder what the Japanese will be reading after RCALF gets their day in court? That should really help out with negotiations. Would they then believe in the tests that are done, even if done on 100% of the animals?
 

frenchie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
564
Reaction score
0
Location
nw manitoba
Oldtimer said:
asahi.com > ENGLISH > Opinion,Editorial
EDITORIAL/ How safe is U.S. beef?: U.S. testing system for BSE appears highly unreliable.
07/02/2005



A second case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has turned up in the United States, this time in a 12-year-old cow that was born in Texas. That in itself is not particularly surprising since many experts had predicted more cases of mad cow disease would be detected in the United States.

What is shocking, though, is that the DNA test results came out seven months after the first indication of possible BSE infection. In controlling BSE, it is imperative to quickly grasp the source and extent of infection. Whether the current U.S. testing system allows health officials to determine those criteria would appear to be extremely doubtful. )

Shocking]

.

Oldtimer said:
When the infected animal was destroyed last November it was so wobbly, it could not even walk. It tested positive after a simple preliminary BSE test, but tested negative after a second test using a process called immunohistochemistry, or IHC, for conclusive proof. As a result, the cow was determined to be free of BSE. )


I thought this animal was dead on arrival...All right how many more cows are you hiding Ot



Oldtimer said:
In Japan and Europe, testing for BSE uses both the IHC and Western blot methods. If an animal tests positive in either instance, it is assumed to have the disease.

In the United States, both testing methods were used when the first case of BSE was suspected. However, for reasons that have not been explained, U.S. health officials stopped using the Western blot method. It was only in the current case that the USDA agreed to use both methods.)

I wonder why



Oldtimer said:
Perhaps the United States is trying hard not to uncover more cases of BSE. The turn of events makes us uneasy. .)

You think ..As rancher used to say wheres there is smoke ,theres fire


How safe is U.S beef? .

--The Asahi Shimbun, July 1(IHT/Asahi: July 2,2005)[/quote]
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Oldtimer wrote:
When the infected animal was destroyed last November it was so wobbly, it could not even walk.

It tested positive after a simple preliminary BSE test, but tested negative after a second test using a process called immunohistochemistry, or IHC, for conclusive proof. As a result, the cow was determined to be free of BSE. )



I thought this animal was dead on arrival...All right how many more cows are you hiding Ot

Frenchie,has this happened in CANADA?
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
I thought this animal was dead on arrival...All right how many more cows are you hiding Ot

Not to speak for Frenchie, but we haven't seen a dead animal too wobbly to walk here in some time.

This might be in reference to that desease that I've mentioned before in Texas called "the wobbles", right Haymaker?
 

frenchie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
564
Reaction score
0
Location
nw manitoba
PORKER said:
During the past year, the USDA has tested 390,000 cows. Most of them could not walk.


what testing program is this...The same one that failed to catch the Texas cow. How many others slipped throught the gaping holes in the U.S b.s.e surviellence program.

Good thing Fong had some backbone.
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Well we got some beef to ship and some of them walk pertty good.Question Frenchie,Does Canada still put plate wastes in cattle feed that renders get from the eatery's?
 

frenchie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
564
Reaction score
0
Location
nw manitoba
PORKER said:
Well we got some beef to ship and some of them walk pertty good.Question Frenchie,Does Canada still put plate wastes in cattle feed that renders get from the eatery's?

Porker..Do you still feed chickensh!tt , boy I bet the customers line up to get the steaks off those animals.Yummy
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
But don't call it Montreal Steak spice, it's not the same!
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
If the cow was wobbling and could hardly walk in this article what other information the Oldtimer gave us about the dead cow was wrong? :???: can we be sure that she wasn't processed into pet food as she was at a pet food plant? :? By the way Porker Canada ban chicken litter, plate waste and condemned pet food for cattle feed back in 1998. :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tam said:
If the cow was wobbling and could hardly walk in this article what other information the Oldtimer gave us about the dead cow was wrong? :???: can we be sure that she wasn't processed into pet food as she was at a pet food plant? :? By the way Porker Canada ban chicken litter, plate waste and condemned pet food for cattle feed back in 1998. :wink:

TAM TAM TAM--Wake up--Oldtimer didn't tell you anything--that is what this Japanese news article said--this is what the Japanese are reading--Not what Oldtimer said...Get ahold of the Asahai Shimbun and see where they got the info.... :roll: :roll:
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
Wasn't it you Oldtimer that told us a few days ago that the cow arrived dead to a pet food plant at Waco Texas and a she and the other 4 cows on the same truck were incinerated? Now Where did Japan get the information she was just wobbling and if their story was the right verision could your information about what happen to her also be wrong? Just asking no need to get testy :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tam said:
Wasn't it you Oldtimer that told us a few days ago that the cow arrived dead to a pet food plant at Waco Texas and a she and the other 4 cows on the same truck were incinerated? Now Where did Japan get the information she was just wobbling and if their story was the right verision could your information about what happen to her also be wrong? Just asking no need to get testy :wink:

Tam- I'm not sure even the USDA knows again on this cow- They have versions out there from their "experts" and spokesmen saying both ways- just goes to verify what I've said for the last couple of years about USDA not knowing their head from their arse....
 

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Oldtimer said:
Tam said:
Wasn't it you Oldtimer that told us a few days ago that the cow arrived dead to a pet food plant at Waco Texas and a she and the other 4 cows on the same truck were incinerated? Now Where did Japan get the information she was just wobbling and if their story was the right verision could your information about what happen to her also be wrong? Just asking no need to get testy :wink:

Tam- I'm not sure even the USDA knows again on this cow- They have versions out there from their "experts" and spokesmen saying both ways- just goes to verify what I've said for the last couple of years about USDA not knowing their head from their arse....

I believe every one of them are ex packer employee's and ncba members,that are controlled by the ami,what does that tell you?........good luck
 

Latest posts

Top