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Wolves to be considered for culling elk herds

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Larrry

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Wolves to be considered for culling elk herds
Natural predators only one option available to planners.


Wolf
The reintroduction of wolves will be considered as a means of controlling elk herds on the Baca National Wildlife Refuge in the San Luis Valley.

.


Wolves to be considered for culling elk herds By MATT HILDNER | [email protected] The Pueblo Chieftain | 8 comments

ALAMOSA — An examination of wolf reintroduction to the San Luis Valley didn't come at the prompting of federal wildlife officials.

But they'll still have to take a look at it, thanks to public comment last year urging the idea be considered as a means of controlling elk herds on the Baca National Wildlife Refuge, where elk have taken a heavy toll on the cottonwoods and willows lining stream banks.

"Right now, it's a question. You have a lot of elk, a lot of people would say you need a large predator," said Laurie Shannon, a planning team leader for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "We may not move forward with it, but right now it's on the table."

The mention of wolves takes up only one sentence in a 13-page document laying out the potential management strategies for the Alamosa, Baca and Monte Vista national wildlife refuges.

And it's not a part of the proposed option favored by the agency.

Still, the possibility of wolf reintroduction drew opposition at a Monday night meeting where possible strategies were unveiled.

Steve Russell said the move would be bad for livestock producers.

"I would like it kicked out regardless of how we merge alternatives," he said.

Paul Robertson oversees the Nature Conservancy's Medano-Zapata Ranch, which neighbors the Baca.

‘‘I don't think ‘C’ is a politically wise decision,’’ he said of the alternative that included the mention of wolves.

There were no public comments Tuesday in favor of the idea.

Researchers have cited the 1996 reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park for scattering elk herds and allowing the recovery of riparian shrubs like willows.

But wolves outside the park's boundaries have been a controversial topic, arousing opposition from ranchers, hunters and even governors.

Idaho and Montana have established wolf hunting seasons and a proposal to do so in Wyoming is under review.

The use of predators may receive some consideration in how the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve manages its elk herds.

Park officials are conducting a study of bison and big game at the park that is due out at the same time as the management plan for the wildlife refuges.

Then-acting Superintendent Karl Cordova said in November the Park Service had not ruled out considering predators as a means to control the elk herds.
http://www.chieftain.com/news/region/wolves-to-be-considered-for-culling-elk-herds/article_f3bb655c-4719-11e1-9fa5-001871e3ce6c.html
 

smalltime

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It does work to control the elk population.Mountain lions do a good job too but its true also that cowboys and sheepherders won't like it.Let the fight begin. :)
 

flounder

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why not, stupid is as stupid does, and some times you just can’t fix stupid here. i.e. wolves and mountain lions are susceptible to TSE prion disease, so you may as well and go and expose them too.



Monday, February 14, 2011

THE ROLE OF PREDATION IN DISEASE CONTROL: A COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE REMOVAL ON PRION DISEASE DYNAMICS IN DEER


NO, NO, NOT NO, BUT HELL NO !

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 47(1), 2011, pp. 78-93 © Wildlife Disease Association 2011


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2011/02/role-of-predation-in-disease-control.html


http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2011/11/03/jackson-hole-newsguide-retired-biologist-stop-feeding-make-elk-migrate/





Thursday, December 25, 2008

Lions and Prions and Deer Demise

snip...

Greetings,

A disturbing study indeed, but even more disturbing, the fact that this very study shows the potential for transmission of the TSE agent into the wild of yet another species in the USA. Science has shown that the feline is most susceptible to the TSE agent. Will CWD be the demise of the mountain lions, cougars and such in the USA? How many have ever been tested in the USA? I recall there is a study taking place ;

Review A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease Christina J. Sigurdson et al ;

Mountain lion (Puma concolor) susceptibility to experimental feeding of CWD prions is currently under investigation (M. Miller and L. Wolfe, personal communication).

WHAT about multiple strains of CWD ?

0C7.04

North American Cervids Harbor Two Distinct CWD Strains

snip...

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/12/lions-and-prions-and-deer-demise.html


SNIP...SEE ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/deer-carcass-decomposition-and.html



Wednesday, July 06, 2011

Swine Are Susceptible to Chronic Wasting Disease by Intracerebral Inoculation

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2011/07/swine-are-susceptible-to-chronic.html


Wednesday, October 12, 2011

White-tailed deer are susceptible to the agent of sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2011/10/white-tailed-deer-are-susceptible-to.html


Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Evidence for distinct CWD strains in experimental CWD in ferrets

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2011/09/evidence-for-distinct-cwd-strains-in.html


Thursday, December 10, 2009

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Susceptibility of Several North American Rodents That Are Sympatric with Cervid CWD Epidemics

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/12/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd.html


Chronic Wasting Disease Susceptibility of Four North American Rodents

Chad J. Johnson1*, Jay R. Schneider2, Christopher J. Johnson2, Natalie A. Mickelsen2, Julia A. Langenberg3, Philip N. Bochsler4, Delwyn P. Keane4, Daniel J. Barr4, and Dennis M. Heisey2 1University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Comparative Biosciences, 1656 Linden Drive, Madison WI 53706, USA 2US Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 6006 Schroeder Road, Madison WI 53711, USA 3Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 101 South Webster Street, Madison WI 53703, USA 4Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, 445 Easterday Lane, Madison WI 53706, USA *Corresponding author email: [email protected]

We intracerebrally challenged four species of native North American rodents that inhabit locations undergoing cervid chronic wasting disease (CWD) epidemics. The species were: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), white-footed mice (P. leucopus), meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), and red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi). The inocula were prepared from the brains of hunter-harvested white-tailed deer from Wisconsin that tested positive for CWD. Meadow voles proved to be most susceptible, with a median incubation period of 272 days. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of PrPd in the brains of all challenged meadow voles. Subsequent passages in meadow voles lead to a significant reduction in incubation period. The disease progression in red-backed voles, which are very closely related to the European bank vole (M. glareolus) which have been demonstrated to be sensitive to a number of TSEs, was slower than in meadow voles with a median incubation period of 351 days. We sequenced the meadow vole and red-backed vole Prnp genes and found three amino acid (AA) differences outside of the signal and GPI anchor sequences. Of these differences (T56-, G90S, S170N; read-backed vole:meadow vole), S170N is particularly intriguing due its postulated involvement in “rigid loop” structure and CWD susceptibility. Deer mice did not exhibit disease signs until nearly 1.5 years post-inoculation, but appear to be exhibiting a high degree of disease penetrance. White-footed mice have an even longer incubation period but are also showing high penetrance. Second passage experiments show significant shortening of incubation periods. Meadow voles in particular appear to be interesting lab models for CWD. These rodents scavenge carrion, and are an important food source for many predator species. Furthermore, these rodents enter human and domestic livestock food chains by accidental inclusion in grain and forage. Further investigation of these species as potential hosts, bridge species, and reservoirs of CWD is required.

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/08/third-international-cwd-symposium-july.html


please see ;

http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/3rd_CWD_Symposium_utah.pdf



Thursday, January 26, 2012

The Risk of Prion Zoonoses

Science 27 January 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6067 pp. 411-413 DOI: 10.1126/science.1218167


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/01/risk-of-prion-zoonoses.html



Thursday, January 26, 2012


Facilitated Cross-Species Transmission of Prions in Extraneural Tissue


Science 27 January 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6067 pp. 472-475 DOI: 10.1126/science.1215659


http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6067/472.full


more here ;


“which may prompt a reevaluation of the effectiveness of species barriers”



http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/01/facilitated-cross-species-transmission.html




tss
 

Triangle Bar

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The Baca Refuge is just 8 miles south of my place. There was a public meeting at the school on Wednesday about the planning process and wolves were never mentioned. That is until the question was directly asked of them... and typical of the government employee, a very coy answer was given, neither confirming or denying that was an option being considered.

When this Baca Land Grant was purchased by the fed, the promise was made that it would be maintained as a working ranch and that hunting would be allowed since the previous owner didn't allow hunting. The grazing and haying by the surrounding ranchers has continued, so far, but hunting has not been allowed. So for the last 10 years and proceeding 30 years plus of private ownership, the elk herds have expanded and grown into considerable problems. When multiple herds of 800 to 1000 head each move off the baca they destroy every fence in their way and graze to the ground the surrounding ranch land. Wildlife officers in the attempt to reduce the population harvested 150 cow elk last winter. The meat went to the valley's food banks but more work needs to be done. A few wolves are not going to solve this problem, just create more conflicts.
 

smalltime

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I am asumming flounder you are against that type of control because the cats and wolves will get prion desease and then spread it to other spieses?
 

flounder

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smalltime said:
I am asumming flounder you are against that type of control because the cats and wolves will get prion desease and then spread it to other spieses?



that's my take, the threat is real, and in the end, it's not going to control anything, other than enhance the exposure of the TSE prion agent. if you must reduce the herd, then shoot them, test them (wait for results), and then eat them.

it's been documented that cats can easily become infected with the TSE prion disease. in fact, a study out last year about cwd to domestic cats ;



Oral.29: Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to CWD Infection


Amy Nalls, Nicholas J. Haley, Jeanette Hayes-Klug, Kelly Anderson, Davis M. Seelig, Dan S. Bucy, Susan L. Kraft, Edward A. Hoover and Candace K. Mathiason†

Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO USA†Presenting author; Email: [email protected]

Domestic and non-domestic cats have been shown to be susceptible to one prion disease, feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), thought to be transmitted through consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) contaminated meat. Because domestic and free ranging felids scavenge cervid carcasses, including those in CWD affected areas, we evaluated the susceptibility of domestic cats to CWD infection experimentally. Groups of n = 5 cats each were inoculated either intracerebrally (IC) or orally (PO) with CWD deer brain homogenate. Between 40–43 months following IC inoculation, two cats developed mild but progressive symptoms including weight loss, anorexia, polydipsia, patterned motor behaviors and ataxia—ultimately mandating euthanasia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the brain of one of these animals (vs. two age-matched controls) performed just before euthanasia revealed increased ventricular system volume, more prominent sulci, and T2 hyperintensity deep in the white matter of the frontal hemisphere and in cortical grey distributed through the brain, likely representing inflammation or gliosis. PrPRES and widely distributed peri-neuronal vacuoles were demonstrated in the brains of both animals by immunodetection assays. No clinical signs of TSE have been detected in the remaining primary passage cats after 80 months pi. Feline-adapted CWD was sub-passaged into groups (n=4 or 5) of cats by IC, PO, and IP/SQ routes. Currently, at 22 months pi, all five IC inoculated cats are demonstrating abnormal behavior including increasing aggressiveness, pacing, and hyper responsiveness. Two of these cats have developed rear limb ataxia. Although the limited data from this ongoing study must be considered preliminary, they raise the potential for cervid-to-feline transmission in nature.

http://www.prion2011.ca/files/PRION_2011_-_Posters_(May_5-11).pdf



Hunting and diet




A successful generalist predator, the cougar will eat any animal it can catch, from insects to large ungulates (over 500 kg). Like all cats, it is an obligate carnivore, feeding only on meat. The mean weight of vertebrate prey (MWVP) was positively correlated (r=0.875) with puma body weight and inversely correlated (r=-0.836) with food niche breadth in all America. In general, MWVP was lower in areas closer to the Equator.[3] Its most important prey species are various deer species, particularly in North America; mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and even large moose are taken by the cat. Other species such as Bighorn Sheep, wild horses of Arizona, domestic horses, and domestic livestock such as cattle and sheep are also primary food bases in many areas.[38] A survey of North America research found 68% of prey items were ungulates, especially deer. Only the Florida Panther showed variation, often preferring feral hogs and armadillos.[3]



Shown eating. Cougars are ambush predators, feeding mostly on deer and other mammals. Investigation in Yellowstone National Park showed that elk, followed by mule deer, were the cougar's primary targets; the prey base is shared with the park's gray wolves, with whom the cougar competes for resources.[39] Another study on winter kills (November–April) in Alberta showed that ungulates accounted for greater than 99% of the cougar diet. Learned, individual prey recognition was observed, as some cougars rarely killed bighorn sheep, while others relied heavily on the species.[40]



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cougar





Oral.22:



Transmission and Pathogenesis of Chronic Wasting Disease in Cervid and Non-Cervid Species



Edward Hoover,† Candace K. Mathiason, Nicholas J. Haley, Timothy D. Kurt, Davis M. Seelig, Amy V. Nalls, Mark D. Zabel, Glenn C. Telling Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology; Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO; Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and Neurology; University of Kentucky Medical Center; Lexington, KY USA †Presenting author



Now recognized in 18 states in the US, two Canadian provinces, and one Asian country, efficient horizontal transmission is a signature trait of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids. The facile spread of CWD appears linked to the prion/host relationship facilitating efficient mucosal uptake, peripheral lymphoreticular amplification, and horizontal dissemination exploiting excretory tissues and their products. In addition, recent studies suggest the likelihood of early life mother to offspring transmission. Growing evidence from studies of cervid CWD exposure by natural routes indicate that the incubation period for overt infection detection and disease onset (if any) may be much longer than originally thought. Whether non-cervid species (including humans) may be susceptible to CWD infection and/or act as reservoirs for infection in nature remains unknown. In vitro and in vivo studies of the CWD species barrier indicate the potential for a host range extending beyond cervid species, although no evidence for this has thus far been detected in nature. Interestingly, rodent and mustelid species sympatric with free ranging cervids have been shown susceptible to CWD prions and such trans-species infection broadens the host range/strain characteristics of CWD prions. While the origins of CWD remain unknown, the relationship between sheep scrapie and CWD and the existence of multiple CWD prion strains/quasispecies remain interesting and merit further investigation.


snip...more here ;




Monday, August 8, 2011


Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to CWD Infection



Oral.29: Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to CWD Infection



http://felinespongiformencephalopathyfse.blogspot.com/




now, canine spongiform encephalopathy has never been documented to date. however, like the bungling brains episode of the sheep and cattle in the UK, something similar happened in the 'hound study'. you can take this with how ever many grains of salt you wish, but something was fishy about those hound brains ;



TSE & HOUNDS

GAH WELLS (very important statement here...TSS)

HOUND STUDY

AS implied in the Inset 25 we must not _ASSUME_ that transmission of BSE to other species will invariably present pathology typical of a scrapie-like disease.

snip...

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/01/04004001.pdf


NEW URL ;


http://web.archive.org/web/20010305222642/www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/01/04004001.pdf





76 pages on hound study;


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/sc/seac16/tab04.pdf



NEW URL ;


http://web.archive.org/web/20030327022236/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/sc/seac16/tab04.pdf



I thought that in Britain dogs had contracted BSE, but perhaps not?


not so fast here;


The spongiform changes were not pathognomonic (ie. conclusive proof) for prion disease, as they were atypical, being largely present in white matter rather than grey matter in the brain and spinal cord. However, Tony Scott, then head of electron microscopy work on TSEs, had no doubt that these SAFs were genuine and that these hounds therefore must have had a scrapie-like disease. I reviewed all the sections myself (original notes appended) and although the pathology was not typical, I could not exclude the possibility that this was a scrapie-like disorder, as white matter vacuolation is seen in TSEs and Wallerian degeneration was also present in the white matter of the hounds, another feature of scrapie.


38.I reviewed the literature on hound neuropathology, and discovered that micrographs and descriptive neuropathology from papers on 'hound ataxia' mirrored those in material from Robert Higgins' hound survey. Dr Tony Palmer (Cambridge) had done much of this work, and I obtained original sections from hound ataxia cases from him. This enabled me provisionally to conclude that Robert Higgins had in all probability detected hound ataxia, but also that hound ataxia itself was possibly a TSE. Gerald Wells confirmed in 'blind' examination of single restricted microscopic fields that there was no distinction between the white matter vacuolation present in BSE and scrapie cases, and that occurring in hound ataxia and the hound survey cases.


39.Hound ataxia had reportedly been occurring since the 1930's, and a known risk factor for its development was the feeding to hounds of downer cows, and particularly bovine offal. Circumstantial evidence suggests that bovine offal may also be causal in FSE, and TME in mink. Despite the inconclusive nature of the neuropathology, it was clearly evident that this putative canine spongiform encephalopathy merited further investigation.


40.The inconclusive results in hounds were never confirmed, nor was the link with hound ataxia pursued. I telephoned Robert Higgins six years after he first sent the slides to CVL. I was informed that despite his submitting a yearly report to the CVO including the suggestion that the hound work be continued, no further work had been done since 1991. This was surprising, to say the very least.


41.The hound work could have provided valuable evidence that a scrapie-like agent may have been present in cattle offal long before the BSE epidemic was recognised. The MAFF hound survey remains unpublished.


Histopathological support to various other published MAFF experiments


42.These included neuropathological examination of material from experiments studying the attempted transmission of BSE to chickens and pigs (CVL 1991) and to mice (RVC 1994).


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/witness/htm/stat067.htm


It was thought likely that at least some, and probably all, of the cases in zoo animals were caused by the BSE agent. Strong support for this hypothesis came from the findings of Bruce and others (1994) ( Bruce, M.E., Chree, A., McConnell, I., Foster, J., Pearson, G. & Fraser, H. (1994) Transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie to mice: strain variation and species barrier. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 343, 405-411: J/PTRSL/343/405 ), who demonstrated that the pattern of variation in incubation period and lesion profile in six strains of mice inoculated with brain homogenates from an affected kudu and the nyala, was similar to that seen when this panel of mouse strains was inoculated with brain from cattle with BSE. The affected zoo bovids were all from herds that were exposed to feeds that were likely to have contained contaminated ruminant-derived protein and the zoo felids had been exposed, if only occasionally in some cases, to tissues from cattle unfit for human consumption.

snip...

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s324.pdf


NEW URL ;


http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102174910/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s324.pdf




2005

DEFRA Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs

Area 307, London, SW1P 4PQ Telephone: 0207 904 6000 Direct line: 0207 904 6287 E-mail: h.mcdonagh.defra.gsi.gov.uk

GTN: FAX:

Mr T S Singeltary P.O. Box 42 Bacliff Texas USA 77518

21 November 2001

Dear Mr Singeltary

TSE IN HOUNDS

Thank you for e-mail regarding the hounds survey. I am sorry for the long delay in responding.

As you note, the hound survey remains unpublished. However the Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC), the UK Government's independent Advisory Committee on all aspects related to BSE-like disease, gave the hound study detailed consideration at their meeting in January 1994. As a summary of this meeting published in the BSE inquiry noted, the Committee were clearly concerned about the work that had been carried out, concluding that there had clearly been problems with it, particularly the control on the histology, and that it was more or less inconclusive. However was agreed that there should be a re-evaluation of the pathological material in the study.

Later, at their meeting in June 95, The Committee re-evaluated the hound study to see if any useful results could be gained from it. The Chairman concluded that there were varying opinions within the Committee on further work. It did not suggest any further transmission studies and thought that the lack of clinical data was a major weakness.

Overall, it is clear that SEAC had major concerns about the survey as conducted. As a result it is likely that the authors felt that it would not stand up to r~eer review and hence it was never published. As noted above, and in the detailed minutes of the SEAC meeting in June 95, SEAC considered whether additional work should be performed to examine dogs for evidence of TSE infection. Although the Committee had mixed views about the merits of conducting further work, the Chairman noted that when the Southwood Committee made their recommendation to complete an assessment of possible spongiform disease in dogs, no TSEs had been identified in other species and hence dogs were perceived as a high risk population and worthy of study. However subsequent to the original recommendation, made in 1990, a number of other species had been identified with TSE ( e.g. cats) so a study in hounds was less

critical. For more details see- http://www.bseinquiry, gov.uk/files/yb/1995/06/21005001 .pdf


As this study remains unpublished, my understanding is that the ownership of the data essentially remains with the original researchers. Thus unfortunately, I am unable to help with your request to supply information on the hound survey directly. My only suggestion is that you contact one of the researchers originally involved in the project, such as Gerald Wells. He can be contacted at the following address.

Dr Gerald Wells, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT 15 3NB, UK

You may also wish to be aware that since November 1994 all suspected cases of spongiform encephalopathy in animals and poultry were made notifiable. Hence since that date there has been a requirement for vets to report any suspect SE in dogs for further investigation. To date there has never been positive identification of a TSE in a dog.

I hope this is helpful

Yours sincerely 4

HUGH MCDONAGH BSE CORRESPONDENCE SECTION


===============end...tss==============





HOUND SURVEY

I am sorry, but I really could have been a co-signatory of Gerald's minute.

I do NOT think that we can justify devoting any resources to this study, especially as larger and more important projects such as the pathogenesis study will be quite demanding.

If there is a POLITICAL need to continue with the examination of hound brains then it should be passed entirely to the VI Service.


J W WILESMITH
Epidemiology Unit
18 October 1991

Mr. R Bradley

cc: Mr. G A H Wells


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/10/18001001.pdf



NEW URL ;


http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20081106102318/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/10/18001001.pdf





3.3. Mr R J Higgins in conjunction with Mr G A Wells and Mr A C Scott would by the end of the year, indentify the three brains that were from the ''POSITIVE'' end of the lesion spectrum.


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1993/12/06001001.pdf


NEW URL ;


http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080103034308/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1993/12/06001001.pdf





37. Putative TSE in hounds - work started 1990 -(see para 41)

Robert Higgins, a Veterinary Investigation Officer at Thirsk, had been working on a hound survey in 1990. Gerald Wells and I myself received histological sections from this survey along with the accompanying letter (YB90/11.28/1.1) dated November 1990. This letter details spongiform changes found in brains from hunt hounds failing to keep up with the rest of the pack, along with the results of SAF extractions from fresh brain material from these same animals. SAFs were not found in brains unless spongiform changes were also present. The spongiform changes were not pathognomonic (ie. conclusive proof) for prion disease, as they were atypical, being largely present in white matter rather than grey matter in the brain and spinal cord. However, Tony Scott, then head of electron microscopy work on TSEs, had no doubt that these SAFs were genuine and that these hounds therefore must have had a scrapie-like disease. I reviewed all the sections myself (original notes appended) and although the pathology was not typical, I could not exclude the possibility that this was a scrapie-like disorder, as white matter vacuolation is seen in TSEs and Wallerian degeneration was also present in the white matter of the hounds, another feature of scrapie.

38.I reviewed the literature on hound neuropathology, and discovered that micrographs and descriptive neuropathology from papers on 'hound ataxia' mirrored those in material from Robert Higgins' hound survey. Dr Tony Palmer (Cambridge) had done much of this work, and I obtained original sections from hound ataxia cases from him. This enabled me provisionally to conclude that Robert Higgins had in all probability detected hound ataxia, but also that hound ataxia itself was possibly a TSE. Gerald Wells confirmed in 'blind' examination of single restricted microscopic fields that there was no distinction between the white matter vacuolation present in BSE and scrapie cases, and that occurring in hound ataxia and the hound survey cases.

39.Hound ataxia had reportedly been occurring since the 1930's, and a known risk factor for its development was the feeding to hounds of downer cows, and particularly bovine offal. Circumstantial evidence suggests that bovine offal may also be causal in FSE, and TME in mink. Despite the inconclusive nature of the neuropathology, it was clearly evident that this putative canine spongiform encephalopathy merited further investigation.

40.The inconclusive results in hounds were never confirmed, nor was the link with hound ataxia pursued. I telephoned Robert Higgins six years after he first sent the slides to CVL. I was informed that despite his submitting a yearly report to the CVO including the suggestion that the hound work be continued, no further work had been done since 1991. This was surprising, to say the very least.

41.The hound work could have provided valuable evidence that a scrapie-like agent may have been present in cattle offal long before the BSE epidemic was recognised. The MAFF hound survey remains unpublished.

Histopathological support to various other published MAFF experiments

42.These included neuropathological examination of material from experiments studying the attempted transmission of BSE to chickens and pigs (CVL 1991) and to mice (RVC 1994).


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/witness/htm/stat067.htm



1. I have had no further submission of material or communication regarding this survey since January 1991.


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/10/17001001.pdf



NEW URL ;


http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080103024918/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/10/17001001.pdf




HOUND SURVEY PATHOLOGICAL REPORT (see positive results)


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/11/28001001.pdf


NEW URL ;


http://web.archive.org/web/20030605233318/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/11/28001001.pdf





kind regards, terry



###########bse-l ############




http://caninespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/





5. A positive result from a chimpanzee challenged severely would likely create alarm in some circles even if the result could not be interpreted for man.



***********************



***I have a view that all these agents could be transmitted provided a large enough dose by appropriate routes was given and the animals kept long enough. Until the mechanisms of the species barrier are more clearly understood it might be best to retain that hypothesis.***



************************


6. A negative result would take a lifetime to determine but that would be a shorter period than might be available for human exposure and it would still not answer the question regarding mans' susceptibility. In the meantime no doubt the negativity would be used defensively. It would however be counterproductive if the experiment finally became positive. We may learn more about public reactions following next Monday' s meeting.



R. Bradley

23 September 1990

CVO (+Mr Wells' comments)

Dr T W A Little

Dr B J Shreeve

90/9.23/1.1.



http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102222950/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/09/23001001.pdf



2012


“which may prompt a reevaluation of the effectiveness of species barriers”






Thursday, January 26, 2012

The Risk of Prion Zoonoses


Science 27 January 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6067 pp. 411-413 DOI: 10.1126/science.1218167



http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/01/risk-of-prion-zoonoses.html







http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/01/facilitated-cross-species-transmission.html




now, what have we been feeding cats and dogs ???





Saturday, August 29, 2009

FOIA REQUEST FEED RECALL 2009 Product may have contained prohibited materials Bulk Whole Barley, Recall # V-256-2009

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/08/foia-request-feed-recall-2009-product.html




Thursday, September 3, 2009

429,128 lbs. feed for ruminant animals may have been contaminated with prohibited material Recall # V-258-2009

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/09/429128-lbs-feed-for-ruminant-animals.html




Friday, September 4, 2009

FOIA REQUEST ON FEED RECALL PRODUCT 429,128 lbs. feed for ruminant animals may have been contaminated with prohibited material Recall # V-258-2009

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009_09_01_archive.html




Tuesday, November 3, 2009

re-FOIA REQUEST ON FEED RECALL PRODUCT contaminated with prohibited material Recall # V-258-2009 and Recall # V-256-2009

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/11/re-foia-request-on-feed-recall-product.html


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
To: [email protected]
Cc: [email protected] ; [email protected] ; [email protected] ; [email protected]

FOIA REQUEST ON FEED RECALL PRODUCT 429,128 lbs. feed for ruminant animals may have been contaminated with prohibited material Recall # V-258-2009

September 4, 2009

TO:

Food and Drug Administration

Division of Freedom of Information (HFI-35)

Office of Shared Services

Office of Public Information and Library Services

5600 Fishers Lane

Rockville, MD 20857

Or requests may be sent via fax to: fax number 301-443-1726 or 301-443-1719. If experience difficulty sending a fax, please call (301) 443-2414.

FROM:

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

P.O. Box 42

Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

Greetings FDA FOIE, and the Honorable Phyllis Fong et al @ OIG FOIA,

ANOTHER FOIA REQUEST PLEASE !

I apologize for wasting your time. this could have been handled differently if the FDA et al would just clearly identify these feed recalls with exactly what was in them, and what type recall it is.

I was told that the only way to find any more information on the following recall, i would have to submit a FOIA ? why, i do not know ?

----- Original Message -----

From: Pritchett, Burt
To: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2009 3:26 PM
Subject: RE: hello Mr. Pritchett Sir !!! mad cow feed question

Terry,

That is the extent of the public information on the recall. If you wish to obtain additional information, you should submit a freedom of information act request through our communications staff. You could send an email request to: [email protected]ov

Burt

================end...TSS

Greetings again FDA, OIG et al,

I am trying to find out more information on another recall, that contains possible mad cow protein? but we do not know for sure, the way the recall warning letters are being wrote up now.

I had to file FOIA last week for the same thing. see ;

Saturday, August 29, 2009

FOIA REQUEST FEED RECALL 2009 Product may have contained prohibited materials Bulk Whole Barley, Recall # V-256-2009

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/08/foia-request-feed-recall-2009-product.html


and I recieved 'confirmation' of my request in the postal mail with Log No. xx-xxxxx.

HOWEVER, SADLY, I requested another explaination again from Pritchett, Burt on this newest suspect mad cow feed recall this week below, explaining to him that this is rediculous to have to file a FOIA on every feed recall now, and that all he had to do was to explain exactly what we are speaking of in these recalls, and I have gotten no response to date. SO, I will continue to write these FOIA request, until we get this straightened out, even if it takes another 6+ years to find the truth.

F.O.I.A request on the following please ;

PRODUCT Bulk ground corn; distributed by Saginaw Flakes, Saginaw, TX, Recall # V-258-2009

CODE Bulk ground corn shipped between 05/13/-14/09

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER Recalling Firm: Fargam Land & Grain, Saginaw, TX, by telephone on May 21, 2009. Manufacturer: Mars Petcare US, Clinton, OK.

Firm initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON Bulk ground corn used as feed for ruminant animals may have been contaminated with prohibited material.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE 429,128 lbs.

DISTRIBUTION TX, LA

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

###

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/EnforcementReports/ucm181251.htm


IS this is a BSE/TSE feed ban violation of some sort, or exactly what ?

NOT KNOWING EXACTLY what this recall is about, we must assume it is just more mad cow feed in commerce, but they refuse to tell us exactly what it is.

ruminant animals may have been contaminated with prohibited material

exactly what was it ???

under regs just previously posted, if i understand this right, you now have 3

Subpart B-Listing of Specific Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food or Feed ;

§ 589.1000 Gentian violet.

§ 589.1001 Propylene glycol in or on cat food.

§ 589.2000 Animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed.

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=8f6d4f71330c3337921d820e1854476e&rgn=div5&view=text&node=21:6.0.1.1.26&idno=21


SO, which one is it ???

THIS recall is not confusing ;

10,000,000+ LBS. of PROHIBITED BANNED MAD COW FEED I.E. BLOOD LACED MBM IN COMMERCE USA 2007

Date: March 21, 2007 at 2:27 pm PST

RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: VETERINARY MEDICINES -- CLASS II

___________________________________

PRODUCT

Bulk cattle feed made with recalled Darling's 85% Blood Meal, Flash Dried, Recall # V-024-2007

CODE

Cattle feed delivered between 01/12/2007 and 01/26/2007

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Pfeiffer, Arno, Inc, Greenbush, WI. by conversation on February 5, 2007.

Firm initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON

Blood meal used to make cattle feed was recalled because it was cross- contaminated with prohibited bovine meat and bone meal that had been manufactured on common equipment and labeling did not bear cautionary BSE statement.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE

42,090 lbs.

DISTRIBUTION

WI

___________________________________

PRODUCT

Custom dairy premix products: MNM ALL PURPOSE Pellet, HILLSIDE/CDL Prot- Buffer Meal, LEE, M.-CLOSE UP PX Pellet, HIGH DESERT/ GHC LACT Meal, TATARKA, M CUST PROT Meal, SUNRIDGE/CDL PROTEIN Blend, LOURENZO, K PVM DAIRY Meal, DOUBLE B DAIRY/GHC LAC Mineral, WEST PIONT/GHC CLOSEUP Mineral, WEST POINT/GHC LACT Meal, JENKS, J/COMPASS PROTEIN Meal, COPPINI - 8# SPECIAL DAIRY Mix, GULICK, L-LACT Meal (Bulk), TRIPLE J - PROTEIN/LACTATION, ROCK CREEK/GHC MILK Mineral, BETTENCOURT/GHC S.SIDE MK-MN, BETTENCOURT #1/GHC MILK MINR, V&C DAIRY/GHC LACT Meal, VEENSTRA, F/GHC LACT Meal, SMUTNY, A- BYPASS ML W/SMARTA, Recall # V-025-2007

CODE

The firm does not utilize a code - only shipping documentation with commodity and weights identified.

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Rangen, Inc, Buhl, ID, by letters on February 13 and 14, 2007. Firm initiated recall is complete.

REASON

Products manufactured from bulk feed containing blood meal that was cross contaminated with prohibited meat and bone meal and the labeling did not bear cautionary BSE statement.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE

9,997,976 lbs.

DISTRIBUTION

ID and NV

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR MARCH 21, 2007

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF00996.html

NEW URL

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/EnforcementReports/2007/ucm120446.htm


Thursday, March 19, 2009

MILLIONS AND MILLIONS OF POUNDS OF MAD COW FEED IN COMMERCE USA WITH ONGOING 12 YEARS OF DENIAL

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2009/03/millions-and-millions-of-pounds-of-mad.html



snip...full text ;



http://caninespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/






Saturday, July 23, 2011


CATTLE HEADS WITH TONSILS, BEEF TONGUES, SPINAL CORD, SPECIFIED RISK MATERIALS (SRM's) AND PRIONS, AKA MAD COW DISEASE


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/07/cattle-heads-with-tonsils-beef-tongues.html



Saturday, November 6, 2010


TAFS1 Position Paper on Position Paper on Relaxation of the Feed Ban in the EU


Berne, 2010 TAFS INTERNATIONAL FORUM FOR TRANSMISSIBLE ANIMAL DISEASES AND FOOD SAFETY a non-profit Swiss Foundation


http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/11/tafs1-position-paper-on-position-paper.html



Archive Number 20101206.4364 Published Date 06-DEC-2010 Subject PRO/AH/EDR>


Prion disease update 2010 (11) PRION DISEASE UPDATE 2010 (11)


http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=20101206.4364



October 2009 O.11.3 Infectivity in skeletal muscle of BASE-infected cattle


Silvia Suardi1, Chiara Vimercati1, Fabio Moda1, Ruggerone Margherita1, Ilaria Campagnani1, Guerino Lombardi2, Daniela Gelmetti2, Martin H. Groschup3, Anne Buschmann3, Cristina Casalone4, Maria Caramelli4, Salvatore Monaco5, Gianluigi Zanusso5, Fabrizio Tagliavini1 1Carlo Besta" Neurological Institute,Italy; 2IZS Brescia, Italy; 33FLI Insel Riems, D, Germany; 4CEA-IZS Torino, Italy; 5University of Verona, Italy


Background: BASE is an atypical form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy caused by a prion strain distinct from that of BSE. Upon experimental transmission to cattle, BASE induces a previously unrecognized disease phenotype marked by mental dullness and progressive atrophy of hind limb musculature. Whether affected muscles contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE strain is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible.


Objectives: To investigate the distribution of infectivity in peripheral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with BASE. Methods: Groups of Tg mice expressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV, n= 7-15/group) were inoculated both i.c. and i.p. with 10% homogenates of a variety of tissues including brain, spleen, cervical lymph node, kidney and skeletal muscle (m. longissimus dorsi) from cattle intracerebrally infected with BASE. No PrPres was detectable in the peripheral tissues used for inoculation either by immunohistochemistry or Western blot.


Results: Mice inoculated with BASE-brain homogenates showed clinical signs of disease with incubation and survival times of 175±15 and 207±12 days. Five out of seven mice challenged with skeletal muscle developed a similar neurological disorder, with incubation and survival times of 380±11 and 410±12 days. At present (700 days after inoculation) mice challenged with the other peripheral tissues are still healthy. The neuropathological phenotype and PrPres type of the affected mice inoculated either with brain or muscle were indistinguishable and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with natural BASE.


Discussion: Our data indicate that the skeletal muscle of cattle experimentally infected with BASE contains significant amount of infectivity, at variance with BSE-affected cattle, raising the issue of intraspecies transmission and the potential risk for humans. Experiments are in progress to assess the presence of infectivity in skeletal muscles of natural BASE.



http://www.prion2009.com/sites/default/files/Prion2009_Book_of_Abstracts.pdf




TSS







kind regards,
terry
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Faster horses said:
Raise your hand if you read flounders last post...or even the one before it...

Since I have never read one of his posts I was wondering if that's the same one he has been using since the first time he posted on ranchers? :???:
 

hopalong

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the flipper need to post just to feel good about himself!!!! :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

Rodney Dangerfield and bullhauler get more respect :wink:
 

smalltime

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Thanks flounder for the info.My thought has always been that if we cant shoot the the sick and overstocked herd of deer and elk at least the wolves and cats could be of some help.Although alot of the information and science is over my head I understand your concerns and will keep my mind open and try to learn more.To many times money and profits trump science.
 

EDarrell

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smalltime said:
Thanks flounder for the info.My thought has always been that if we cant shoot the the sick and overstocked herd of deer and elk at least the wolves and cats could be of some help.Although alot of the information and science is over my head I understand your concerns and will keep my mind open and try to learn more.To many times money and profits trump science.

Any significant news on chronic wasting disease in the last year?
 

littlejoe

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"Wolves Needed"?

Great idea!

Call Montana, Idaho or Wyoming--Collect!

Mt can also furnish mountain lions, grizzly bears and 'free roaming' bison!

Sadly, Nevada will be your best source for 'Magnificent' wild horses~~
 

Big Muddy rancher

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littlejoe said:
"Wolves Needed"?

Great idea!

Call Montana, Idaho or Wyoming--Collect!

Mt can also furnish mountain lions, grizzly bears and 'free roaming' bison!

Sadly, Nevada will be your best source for 'Magnificent' wild horses~~

NO,NO

Only Canadian wolves are the ones that will do the job.

We have lots at "Bargain" prices that we will ship down C.O.D.
:D :D :D [/b]
 

farmguy

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Compensation for lost livestock due to wolves is a complete farce. Don't even contact anyone about a loss. All you will do is draw attention to yourself when you do not want it. Take it from the wolf capital of the lower 48, Minnesota.
 

Whitewing

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Faster horses said:
Raise your hand if you read flounders last post...or even the one before it...

Flounder's posts are virtually un-readable. My eyes would bleed if I had to sift through all the lines of bs just to find what was meaningful.
 

Whitewing

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Triangle Bar said:
The Baca Refuge is just 8 miles south of my place. There was a public meeting at the school on Wednesday about the planning process and wolves were never mentioned. That is until the question was directly asked of them... and typical of the government employee, a very coy answer was given, neither confirming or denying that was an option being considered.

When this Baca Land Grant was purchased by the fed, the promise was made that it would be maintained as a working ranch and that hunting would be allowed since the previous owner didn't allow hunting. The grazing and haying by the surrounding ranchers has continued, so far, but hunting has not been allowed. So for the last 10 years and proceeding 30 years plus of private ownership, the elk herds have expanded and grown into considerable problems. When multiple herds of 800 to 1000 head each move off the baca they destroy every fence in their way and graze to the ground the surrounding ranch land. Wildlife officers in the attempt to reduce the population harvested 150 cow elk last winter. The meat went to the valley's food banks but more work needs to be done. A few wolves are not going to solve this problem, just create more conflicts.

As I read the story I was wondering if hunting the animals might not be a reasonable alternative to bring the populations under control. Lots of revenue generated from hunting aside from the recretional benefits.
 

okfarmer

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Whitewing said:
Triangle Bar said:
The Baca Refuge is just 8 miles south of my place. There was a public meeting at the school on Wednesday about the planning process and wolves were never mentioned. That is until the question was directly asked of them... and typical of the government employee, a very coy answer was given, neither confirming or denying that was an option being considered.

When this Baca Land Grant was purchased by the fed, the promise was made that it would be maintained as a working ranch and that hunting would be allowed since the previous owner didn't allow hunting. The grazing and haying by the surrounding ranchers has continued, so far, but hunting has not been allowed. So for the last 10 years and proceeding 30 years plus of private ownership, the elk herds have expanded and grown into considerable problems. When multiple herds of 800 to 1000 head each move off the baca they destroy every fence in their way and graze to the ground the surrounding ranch land. Wildlife officers in the attempt to reduce the population harvested 150 cow elk last winter. The meat went to the valley's food banks but more work needs to be done. A few wolves are not going to solve this problem, just create more conflicts.

As I read the story I was wondering if hunting the animals might not be a reasonable alternative to bring the populations under control. Lots of revenue generated from hunting aside from the recretional benefits.

Exactly! You know what kind of wait there is to draw into many areas? This is purely asinine. The out of state cost is somewhere around $500 for a tag! And people are waiting in line. This is a created problem. They limit the hunters, now need to fix the problem with wolves. Liberal logic through and through.

Flounder, seems like I read somewhere about you losing a family member to cjd. If that is the case, I give you my sincere condolences. That would be a very painful experience. I would understand your interest in the disease. You are probably well aware that it can form by pure happenstance in something like 1 in a few million people. Chronic wasting disease has never been shown to induce disease in people. It hasn't period. Bovine form can. Sheep and cervids (deer, elk) can share a prion, but not with bovines. Anyone stating otherwise is full of it and creating panic and misinformation.

It is a very interesting cituation to study.
 

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