• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Yank PETA's tax-exempt status

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Liberty Belle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
4
Location
northwestern South Dakota
Click on the link to sign the petition to have PETA's tax exempt status yanked away from them for funding enviro-terrorists.

http://www.consumerfreedom.com/article_detail.cfm/article/154
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
LB,

A while back you said there would be no hunting on thousands of acres of Harding Co. land due to the end result of the open fields doctrine.

The next thing I see is that you are having a coyote calling contest in Buffalo and everyone is welcome.

Excuse me for pointing out the obvious but what is the point for people to come call coyotes if the land is closed to hunting?

Were you specific to big game and bird hunting but making an exception for predators?


~SH~
 

rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,059
Reaction score
0
This is none of my business, but will stick my nose out anyways. The difference I see is land shut down to hunting that Fish and Game makes money off of selling license for.
 

CW

Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Location
North Dakota
SH...So happy to have you back, I really miss your point of view on things.
It is very important that everyone on here sign that PETA petition! I have been forwarding the consumerfreedom.com site to everyone I can think of for a year and hope that we can continue this communication. If these nuts get their tax exempt status withdrawn, they will lose their funding as it will no longer be a tax right-off for the liberal richies! Maybe if PETA loses, others will follow...we can only hope!
The link...activistcash.com, will give folks an insite into other organizations, their purpose and funding and is very enlightening. Check the RC affiliates before you visit!!! :roll: Agfreedom.com is another very interesting site and says it like it is, in my opinion!
Cowboy Up and Ride Hard! :cboy:
CW
 

Liberty Belle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
4
Location
northwestern South Dakota
SH - Welcome back!

SH: "A while back you said there would be no hunting on thousands of acres of Harding Co. land due to the end result of the open fields doctrine.

The next thing I see is that you are having a coyote calling contest in Buffalo and everyone is welcome.

Excuse me for pointing out the obvious but what is the point for people to come call coyotes if the land is closed to hunting?

Were you specific to big game and bird hunting but making an exception for predators?"

You darn tootin' we make an exemption for coyotes. We have sheep and our heifers start calving tomorrow. Duh! Now I don't know that these guys will have to buy an expensive license from GF&P to shoot these miserable varmints or not, but it's worth it to us to have them dead. And GF&P had still better check with me before coming in and interupting an ongoing coyote hunt if they know what's good for them. They prevent one coyote from being shot by driving across my pasture without my permission to check on some coyote hunter and there is going to be one very irate women screaming at them in court. Hell hath no fury like a sheepwomen with coyotes in her calving pasture.
 

Jason

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,994
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta Canada
Isn't one of the main predators to the gopher (prairie dog) the coyote?

Food for thought.
 

PPRM

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,951
Reaction score
0
Location
NE Oregon
LB,

If you hat epredators so much, why would you prevent the depopulation of their primary food source??????? You can find guys to hunt game on your land that respect it.



PPRM
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
LB: "Hell hath no fury like a sheepwomen with coyotes in her calving pasture."

Hahaha! Absolutely!

I just wanted to make sure we were clear on the coyote exemption from "no hunting". Thanks for the vivid clarification. LOL!

I doubt you have to worry about any GF&P representative messing with an organized coyote hunt. Don't be so paranoid. If I was there, I would assist with the organization of the hunt any way I could because they are a lot of fun.

A good friend of mine spent the last two months trapping in Harding Co. and he removed 40 coyotes during that time period which is respectable considering the coyote population in that area due to predator control efforts and mange.

Although every coyote that is taken can help, especially any older resident coyotes, these calling contests usually target areas of highest coyote populations as opposed to problem areas. Someone still needs to take out those denning pairs in March and April to prevent problems later.

By having the contest this late, you are definitely doing more good than you would during the peak of the immigration period of Nov. Dec. and Jan.

Best of luck in your contest. No way I can get away now.



~SH~
 

Liberty Belle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
4
Location
northwestern South Dakota
SH - I'm not that paranoid! I'm sure our CO wouldn't dream of messing up a coyote hunt in this county. He's had his troubles in the past, but he's not stupid.

I'm curious. Is your friend who was trapping in HC also a friend of DeBow's in Camp Crook? Matt told me they had a friend from over east doing a lot of trapping here this winter with really good results.

Oh, and just to make our hunting position really clear, we also encourage prairie dog hunters. Just call and we'll let you know where to find the little yapping rodents.

Jason: The coyotes can’t begin to keep up eating prairie dogs and they would rather eat lamb and veal.

PPRM: Our problem has never been with hunters. We have had all sorts of them who have been good about respecting the land and the landowners. We just don’t allow big game hunters because if we let them in to hunt, because they way things are in South Dakota, we also must give up our private property rights to the GF&P. They claim the right to come on our land without our permission, or even our knowledge. We aren’t willing to allow that trespass, hence no hunting. The license money for these hunts goes to fund GF&P and we object to that money being used against us, so we would just as soon no one would buy big game licenses.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
LB: "I'm curious. Is your friend who was trapping in HC also a friend of DeBow's in Camp Crook?"

My friend, TR, stayed in Camp Crook last year with his friend LC but not this year. They trapped together last year but seperately this year. This year TR stayed in Buffalo and LC stayed in Camp Crook.

LC used to trap for the state as a seasonal in Aberdeen. TR and I have been friends since college.

Hope that clarifies the situation a little.



~SH~
 

PPRM

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,951
Reaction score
0
Location
NE Oregon
LB,

If you let game hunters onto your property, does that allow Fish and Game on there ordoes it open your property up to all hunters????

I really wouldn't object to Fish and Game people in Oregon. I'm guessing there may have been a problemin the past??????
 

Liberty Belle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
4
Location
northwestern South Dakota
"If you let game hunters onto your property, does that allow Fish and Game on there ordoes it open your property up to all hunters???? "

It opens our property to trespass by the GF&P. They claim the right to violate our private property rights by coming onto our land, without our knowledge or consent, merely to do what they call "compliance checks" to see if the hunters have the proper tags, etc.

It does not open our property to all hunters. Hunters, unlike GF&P, usually have enough class to at least ask permission before coming onto private land and if they don’t we can have them prosecuted.

The South Dakota attorney general refused to proceed with trespassing charges brought against the local game warden caught trespassing on private land he had expressly been told stay away from, so we'll just keep hunters and GF&P both locked out until we get some protection written into law.
 

Manitoba_Rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
2,117
Reaction score
0
Location
Canada
PETA and R-calf are a fine pair. IS R-calf this dumb that they would align themselves with an animal protecting group. Shows what the leaders of R-calf think about the industry!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
LB: "Hunters, unlike GF&P, usually have enough class to at least ask permission before coming onto private land and if they don’t we can have them prosecuted."

To the contrary, unlike hunters, GF&P trappers have to have releases signed before conducting predator control on private land.

This notion that "GF&P" can go whereever it wants and do whatever it needs to do is absolutely untrue.

I have 400 landowner releases signed to prove otherwise.

As to the conservation officers, you already admitted that you have never seen a Conservation Officer on your place and so did SC.



~SH~
 

Liberty Belle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
4
Location
northwestern South Dakota
SH: "To the contrary, unlike hunters, GF&P trappers have to have releases signed before conducting predator control on private land.

This notion that "GF&P" can go whereever it wants and do whatever it needs to do is absolutely untrue.

I have 400 landowner releases signed to prove otherwise."

Sorry SH, I should have clarified my statement to say that GF&P game wardens can go wherever they want and do whatever they want without landowner knowledge or consent. I know that trappers are supposed to have signed landowner releases to come on private land. I don’t know about you, but our trapper has only lately started to get signed permission slips.

Do you find that getting those releases hinders your job in any way? Please tell me why game wardens shouldn't have to abide by the same rules that you do. You know that permission can be obtained months or even years before you need it and in the process of gathering those signatures, the CO would be forced to develop some of those "communication skills" that Sec. Cooper talks about so much and we have found to be almost totally lacking around here.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
LB: "Do you find that getting those releases hinders your job in any way?"

Absolutely not! In fact, for my job, I feel it's imperative.

What hinders my job is not having access to land where problem animals are coming from. Most landowners are cooperative in providing access to work problem animals especially now with lower fur prices.

Those permission releases also release the landowner from any liability that may come about as a result of my actions on his land. It's a win win.

We used to have to get "ANNUAL AGREEMENTS" signed. That was a pain when considering how many landowners I was working on within a single year. Now we are encouraged to get "AGREEMENTS" updated every 3 years which works better for me and has not created any problems.

A landowner can void the permission at any time by calling the number on the release. I can't remember ever being kicked off property that I had written permission on during the period of the release. I'm not there unless there is a problem or potential problem.

Any stipulation can be written on the contract such as staying x amount of distance from horses, not conducting ADC work during hunting season, etc. etc.

With that said, my job is totally different than a Conservation Officer's job of enforcing game laws which would naturally lend itself to some landowners, who may be prone to breaking game laws, not granting permission.


LB: "Please tell me why game wardens shouldn't have to abide by the same rules that you do."

When it comes to checking hunting licenses, those who cater to game violations are not going to grant permission to a warden to check their licenses if they are illegal.

Public wildlife residing on private land lends itself to this problem.

You and I will continue to disagree on this issue so there is no sense to keep rehashing it.


LB: "You know that permission can be obtained months or even years before you need it and in the process of gathering those signatures, the CO would be forced to develop some of those "communication skills" that Sec. Cooper talks about so much and we have found to be almost totally lacking around here."

I think landowner relations is a very important part of being a Conservation Officer. Not just from the standpoint of getting permission to access the land for reasons other than law enforcement but to find out how landowners feel about hunting seasons, the number of licenses issued, etc. etc. Those contacts are very important.

Everytime I go into a classroom and talk to kids about wildlife I ask myself why I don't do it more because it's so rewarding. I think those things are important. Every GF&P employee should be encouraged to work with the kids in the area with archery, gun safety, fishing derby's, youth hunts, etc. etc. They should also be encouraged to be members of the volunteer fire department and ambulance crews. That's how you meet people on good terms.

My first experience with GF&P was a Conservation Officer that taught me how to reload shells and call coyotes. My idea of the ideal conservation officer is one who is well known, well liked, and well respected in the community. They prevent game violations simply by nobody wanting to be arrested by their friend. There is no better situation.

Believe it or not, we have many Conservation Officers that have that working relationship in their community. Dennis Lengkeek from Burke, Jim Schroeder from Sturgis, and Owen Meadows from Hot Springs are all examples of Conservation Officers that were well liked and respected in their communities. All three continue to serve in their communities after their retirement. Pat Dinkins had nearly 200 producers show up at his retirement in Bison. Those guys are all role models and they should set the stage for future employees.



~SH~
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
~SH~
You seem to be all for less government and protection of individual rights until it comes to this issue. Why does this attempt to protect private property rights bother you so much? It wouldn't have anything to do with who signs your paycheck would it?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Interesting article from Rounds' administration. They seem to be very selective about when property rights should be protected and when they can be ignored.
AW

LARRY GABRIEL, SECRETARYSouth Dakota Department of Agriculture523 East Capitol Avenue Pierre, SD 57501-3182 Telephone: (800) 228-5254 or (605) 773-5425 Fax: 605-773-5926 http://www.state.sd.us/doaWEEKLY NEWS FROM THE SECRETARYWhy does hunting bother so many landowners?Disputes between hunters, the government and landowners are as old as the idea of property ownership, and will probably continue for as long as the right to own private property exists.Actually it is not the hunting that bothers us. What bothers us is a lack of respect for us and our property rights. A man who has worked his entire life to build a farm or ranch deserves a little respect for that.Long ago, the public schools taught something called “citizenship” or civics. We received grades on it in various areas. One of the areas listed on every report card was “respect for the rights and property of others”.We presently have a landowner ban on hunting imposed in a large chunk of Western South Dakota. We have had several cases taken all the way to our Supreme Court at no small expense to landowners seeking to protect their rights. These disputes are not caused by any anti-hunting sentiments or philosophy. No such disputes would exist, if people were doing their best to “respect” the rights and property of others.If we truly “respect” the property owner’s rights, we will not go to the courthouse and search for a section line or other easement to gain access for hunting without permission.Legalistic technicalities have nothing to do with respect. I do not have to like what you do to respect it, just as I don’t have to like what some people say in order to respect their right to hold their own views and express their own opinions.I may not like it, but I respect the fact that the State holds wildlife in trust for the people of this state. I may not like it, but I respect the fact that wildlife numbers must be managed by professionals through controlled harvests called “hunting seasons”.What we farmers and ranchers really want, is the same “respect” from the hunters and government officials that was once taught in civics class. A good citizen has enough respect to ask, even if he doesn’t have to do it.You may not have to ask a farmer to hunt on the section lines across his property, but if you respect him and his property rights you will do it anyway.You may not have to ask a lessee of public grazing lands for permission to hunt in his pastures, but a respectful citizen will do it anyway.You may not have to ask the landowner who has opened a portion of his land to public hunting, but respect requires it when the law does not.Most of these problems will disappear when we all remember the civics and good manners we were taught as children. Those who were never taught will then learn by example. The only way to guarantee failure is to not try. Larry Gabriel
 

Latest posts

Top