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Yeast culture in mineral or in general

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Faster horses

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I was looking for an article I had on 'twinning in beef cattle'. Didn't find it, but I did find this article. Since it is weaning time, and I constantly beat this drum, I thought it was worth posting here.

Sick calves and hospital pen stays are expensive. Costs extend beyond lost production, lost animals, veterinary bills and additional staffing needs. They include longer feedlot stays and reduced carcass quality.

Results from the highly respected, ongoing Ranch-to-Rail Program of Texas A&M University helps quantify the difference. In 2001, 39% of healthy cattle graded Choice and above, while 27 percent of those requiring medical treatment rolled Choice or higher. The premiums and discounts received also were affected.

Numerous trials and years of research by Diamond V Mills reveals a key management tool for kekeping catle healthy and shortening hospital-pen stays: Yeast Culture.

Yeast Culture nutures the rumen microbes that support the efficient break down of feed stuffs into nutrients for absorption by the animal for growth, maintenance and production.

Nutrient availablity significantly impacts calf health and hospital-pen visits.
Calves with optimally performing rumens typically have stronger immune responses, better performance and higher average daily gains.

Stress and disease disrupt rumen performance and devastate the microbial populations. These microbial populations consist of various bacteria and protozoa. "Stress deals rumen performance a crippling blow," says Craig Belknap, technical service, Diamond V Mills. "Research shows that as a result of stress, remen fermentation decreased to 10 to 15% of normal, rumen bacteria plummets to just 10% of normal and a total disruption occurs in the balance among the various bacterial species. Rumen performance gets tied up in a big knot.

Loosening and untying that knot helps keep calves out of the hospital-pen and helps shorten hospital-pen stays for better feedlot performance and higher quality beef grades at slaughter. This can be done with good management, proper nutrition and supplementatin with Diamond V Yeast Culture, according to Belknap. Yeast culture also enhances ration palatibility to help draw sick or finicky calves to the bunk.

The rumen microbial populations serve a double purpose, says Belknap. "After supporting feedstuff digestibility in the rumen, the microbes move with the rumen contents into the intestine. Here, the microbes serves as a source of protein for growth and lean muscle development. This microbial protein comprises the vast majority of the animals total protein requirement and is typically the highest quality protein source available to the animal."

Existing research indicates that including Diamond V Yeast Culture in feedlot rations contributes to a reduction in the number of sick calves. This results in reduced treatment and labor costs, reduced death loss and higher quality carcasses. It also contributes to improved daily gains for reduced yardage and interest. And it contributes to improved feed efficiency for redeuced feed expenses.
 

George

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I looked at the tag on the ADM mineral for fescue and it does not mention yeast - - -I then looked at the tag for the Moorman IGR I use in the other pastures and again it does not mention yeast- - - I guess I will have to start a VigorTone dealership or have it shipped in as we don't have an active dealer
 

Faster horses

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I'm really suprised that ADM mineral does not contain yeast culture. Interesting.

Archers-Daniel Midland does own Moormans.

I bet it has soy in it because they own most of the soybean plants. :wink:

The tag doesn't say ANYTHING about yeast culture of any kind?

I know that many of the feeders receiving calves add yeast culture right to the feed, that's how important they think it is.

Are you planning on weaning your calves or buying some calves to feed? Maybe you could get in touch with Diamond V Yeast Culture direct. Maybe they could help. I think they might have something to add to the feed.

Call Vigortone and tell them you are interested in becoming a dealer. They might want someone in your area.
 

George

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I did not know that ADM owned Mooremans - - - - it seems this is the normal any more.

The tags just do not mention Yeast - - - I will get with mt dealer and see what he has to say
 

shorthorn

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Hubbard feeds is in the process of buying moormans last that i heard. And george there is a hubbard plant in castleton that could hook you up with some yeast or a mineral that has it.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Just weaned the calves. Put Vigortone out for them in the same blue tubs that we used all summer with the cows and calves. The calves are digging right in to the mineral. It has the yeast culture for the rumen salt for water consumption and vit A. The hair is the nicest I can ever remember and I sure hope the health stays good as they seem to be off to a great start. :cowboy:
 

Faster horses

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Yep!!! The yeast culture makes 'em really like the mineral. No grain of any kind to get sour or hard, just yeast culture to enhance palatability and enhance rumen function.

It contains Vitamin E also, for optimum health.

Thanks for posting BMR. I love good news! :clap: :clap: :nod: :clap:
 

EJ

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FH, I`ve been useing Diamond V yeast for several decades. It is a top notch product that appears to a be well kept secret.
 

alabama

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I brought this back to the top because I also want to know how to use the yeast culture “Diamond V.”
When I have feed mixed, how much do I use?
Do we need to keep feeding it after the yeast is established in the rumen or can we stop using it after a few days?
Will it affect the shelf life of the feed?
 

Mike

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http://www.vigortone.com/probiotics.htm

An interesting article on rumen microorganisms.
 

Randy

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Diamond V Yeast Culture is not a “live yeast” product. The environment in the rumen is generally not favorable for live yeast to survive. Live yeast cells do not break down feedstuffs like bacteria. Live yeast cells are lacking the necessary hydrolytic enzymes like amylase and cellulase, which are needed to digest complex carbohydrates. Rather they can only digest simple sugars like fructose, glucose, and the disaccharides sucrose and maltose. These simple sugars are in demand in the rumen by billions of rumen bacteria. As well, yeast cell walls are made up of carbohydrates, which makes them a source of food for rumen bacteria. One final thought is that live yeast do not stand up to heat, which may come by way of a pelleting process or warmer warehouse conditions. Nor do they stand up to the jagged edges of minerals. The manufacturer’s guarantee does not always hold true!

Diamond V Yeast Culture is a fully fermented yeast culture made up of metabolites that stimulate the bacteria in the rumen – essentially it is food for the bugs! When these bacteria are stimulated, they grow, reproduce, and breakdown feedstuffs in the rumen. The end result is that Diamond V Yeast Culture helps the animal to more efficiently utilize all the nutrients provide in the supplement or ration. Yeast culture also provides a palatability factor and aroma that will encourage supplement or feed intake.

Feeding rates for Diamond V Yeast Culture depend on the age of the animal and the type of yeast culture you purchase. YC is the original yeast culture. XP is the same as YC, except that it is 2.5 times more concentrate, meaning that you will not need to feed as much. For those that get their supplements or rations made off-site at a mill, there is XPC; 4 times more concentrated that XP. YC or XP can be used by feed manufacturers too. Both YC and XP can be top-dressed, or put in a supplement or total mixed ration. XPC is solely for further manufacture of feed.

The feeding rates below are given on a per head per day basis:

Creep fed calves = YC-35 grams (1.25 oz), XP-7 grams (0.5 oz)
Starting/Receiving Cattle = YC-140 grams (5 oz), XP-56 grams (2 oz)
Grow-Finish Cattle = YC-70 grams (2.5 oz), XP = 28 grams (1 oz)
Breeding Animals = YC-70 grams (2.5 oz), XP = 28 grams (1 oz)

For animals that encounter environmental, physiological, or nutritional stress, it is recommended that you DOUBLE (2x) the rates above. The shelf life of Diamond V Yeast Culture is up to 2 years if properly stored like other feed ingredients in a cool, moisture free environment – discard any product that is clumping or has a moldy smell. Diamond V Yeast Culture will not affect the shelf life of any ingredients that it may be mixed with. You need to read labels and product tags carefully. There are many companies that call their yeast product "yeast culture", even though it may just be a blend of live yeast and some carrier like distiller's grain. Accept no substitute - Diamond V is a truly fully fermented product!

Hope this helps!
 

Juan

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In the probiotics link posted by Mike........."An increase of cellulose-digesting rumen bacteria should result in more forage in the ration being digested" Notice they said"should".
The whole deal is to help ruminants digest starch.They do fine on cellulose with their own "bugs"
 

Mike

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Juan said:
In the probiotics link posted by Mike........."An increase of cellulose-digesting rumen bacteria should result in more forage in the ration being digested" Notice they said"should".
The whole deal is to help ruminants digest starch.They do fine on cellulose with their own "bugs"

Juan, I went to a seminar last year on "Feeding the Bugs" in cattle. The speaker said there were 2 distinct strains of cattle rumen bugs. One for starch and one for roughage (cellulose). He went on to say that the two are basically incompatible, or, they do not get along well in the same rumen environment Thus the reason for either feeding a cow on full feed or feed them only 3-5 lbs of grain per day. You will always have both but one will always be predominant above the other.

It usually takes a month to convert cattle from one bug to the other and for her to become adjusted and gaing well. This is why there is always a "warm-up" period at the feedyard or in a bull test.
 

George

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I really appricate the help I get here :D - - - I never knew there was a special mineral for fescue forage :? .

I put it out for my cattle about 3 weeks ago and WOW what a differance :!:

My cattle acted tender footed after about three days on the fescue :???: and would spend considerable time standing in the creek. :(

It was so bad that I would pull them off the fescue every three days and rotate them to the pastures of mixed orchard grass and timothy with some blue grass. I have tried to eliminate the fescue but the ground where it is is to hilly to get a tractor over. Now with this new information ( mineral) I have left them on the same ground and they are giving the other lots a needed break and I don't see the tender feet or the standing in water. :D :D

Now I will explore the yeast and see if I can improve even more. :!:
 

EJ

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Agreed FH yeast culture should be "shouted out". My only means of supplying it is throught the mineral tubs. I mix app 8lbs to 100 lbs of mineral. Depending on the time of year I also mix 5lbs of 50gm ctc.

Most minerals already have added yeast but in this case I`ve found that a little more enhances the mineral and ups the amount of intake. I want the mineral in the cow not in the tub.
 

Denny

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Around or area it's common practice to mix a 100#s of mineral with 50#s of salt.I keep mine seperate but lot's of people mix it what do you think of that?
 

Faster horses

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Here is what I KNOW to be true.

Mineral that is already mixed with salt is mixed at the plant with sophisticated machinery. When you mix salt in by hand with a shovel, you cannot adequately mix it. Cows might not get their mineral requirement for the day, yet get their salt requirement for several days, due to poor mixing. Another thing that we run across, people think they are paying too much for salt when they buy it already mixed in the mineral. Big companies can buy salt cheaper than we can at the feed store. We have done a run-down and shown what salt is actually costing when buying it already mixed with the mineral. We have proven that point and consequently, we sell NO mineral that needs salt mixed with it.

We do have some products that contain less salt. It is mainly for areas where consumption is a problem. In areas high in salt, cattle usually don't eat much mineral, so we have mineral with less or NO salt for those places.

If you wish to feed salt with mineral, we advise putting salt out BESIDE the mineral. Loose salt, preferably. We don't advocate blocks of any kind. Cattle will leave blocks before they get enough of whatever it is the block contains. We never advise hand mixing salt with mineral.

So, I guess my answer would be: if you buy mineral without salt, or want to keep salt out, put loose salt out beside the mineral. Do not hand mix it.

Here is another little tip: If your cattle aren't eating enough mineral and you are feeding loose salt beside the mineral, take the salt completely away. That will cause the cattle to eat the mineral.

George, I'm glad the mineral designed for use with fescue is working out well for you. I'm glad to be of help. Do you remember when we had that discussion on here? I did a search and couldn't find it.
 

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