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CCA says Canadian Cattle Industry just Hunky-dory!!!

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Anonymous

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Wildeman says consumers will pay for a better product but will not pay for something they don't feel is safe.

Interesting--Vedddy Interesting...You Canucks have to quit whining--CCA says everythings gonna be just great :roll: :shock:

Funny how this CCA high potentate mentions consumers not wanting anything they don't feel is safe- and how they will be willing to pay for a better product--but says not a word about BSE testing for marketing... :???: :shock:

I wonder how he figures he is going to get these Chinese, Indian, Asian markets and people in that market feeling safe with the product- with the positive mad cow of the month continuing to pop up for the next 10-15 years..... :???:

Cattlemen's V.P. bullish on future



Written by Mark Beaton

Bayshore Broadcasting - Canada

January 8th, 2008



There is a bright light at the end of the tunnel for the Cattle Industry.



Vice President of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association Brad Wildeman says the industy is going through some tough times but believes there is a bright future for the industry.



Wildeman spoke at Beef Day yesterday at the Grey Bruce Farmers Week in Elmwood.



Wildeman says he knows there are markets in China and India are unable to grow enough beef on their own and believes Canada will be able to sell into those markets in the long term.



Wildeman says with the many of the markets that use their beef, they are looking for better safety regulations.



Wildeman says a big issue facing the Cattle Industry is ecoli.



Wildeman says there is a way to cure ecoli with radiation, which he says is safe but the Industry isn't using it.



Wildeman says consumers will pay for a better product but will not pay for something they don't feel is safe.



Wildeman says many of the markets want to be informed when there is an ecoli break out and the break out has been dealt with.



Wildeman says there was always be a few people who will be hesitant about eating beef beacuse of the ecoli problem.



radioowensound.com
 
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Anonymous

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One day we have news articles that all Canadian cattle producers need taxpayer funded loans and welfare-- then a week later we get one of their "leaders" saying things are looking bright :???: - and not a comment one from a Canadian.... :wink: :lol:
 

TimH

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Oldtimer said:
One day we have news articles that all Canadian cattle producers need taxpayer funded loans and welfare-- then a week later we get one of their "leaders" saying things are looking bright :???: - and not a comment one from a Canadian.... :wink: :lol:

Oldtimer, which part of "light AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL" or "going through some tough times" or "future" is it that you don't get?? :roll:
Do you even read the articles you post? Can you?
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
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Anonymous

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TimH said:
Oldtimer said:
One day we have news articles that all Canadian cattle producers need taxpayer funded loans and welfare-- then a week later we get one of their "leaders" saying things are looking bright :???: - and not a comment one from a Canadian.... :wink: :lol:

Oldtimer, which part of "light AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL" or "going through some tough times" or "future" is it that you don't get?? :roll:
Do you even read the articles you post? Can you?
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

"end of tunnel"-- "future" -- 1 year or 20 years :roll: ...USDA/CFIA says you will continue having a BSE problem for 15-20 years.....

Can you hang on 15-20 years there Timmy :???:
 

Manitoba_Rancher

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oldtimer,


Talked to some guys today that said feeder hiefers here are bringing any where from .45-.60 now do you call that a good price?
 
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Manitoba_Rancher said:
oldtimer,


Talked to some guys today that said feeder hiefers here are bringing any where from .45-.60 now do you call that a good price?

Pretty sad MR-- but your CCA boys are out there back slapping and giving you moral support....Can't see where they're doing anything else for you like fighting to get/allow Packers to test to open new markets--or even trying to get new markets (most are happy with the old status quo of depending on the US) --but at least you get a cheerleader :roll: .......Kind of the same thing we got for years from the NCBA.....
 
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Calgary study looks at mental and physical health impact of BSE on producers
16 hours ago

CALGARY - University of Calgary researchers want to know if Canadian beef producers are suffering long-term physical and mental health problems because of the mad cow crisis.

The discovery of the disease on an Alberta farm in May 2003 prompted the United States and other countries to shut their borders to Canadian beef for years, costing the industry more than $1.7 billion and forcing some people off their farms.

Professor Ryan Brook said they hope to find 1,000 farm families who are willing to fill out questionnaires to help measure the human cost of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy scare.

"The premise is that BSE has obviously been devastating to farmers since 2003. There has been a fair amount of research that looks at the economic impacts but little or no research that looks on the health impacts," Brook, a community health expert, said Tuesday.

"There's a lot of people who think the BSE crisis is now over but farmers are saying it's not."

Brook expects that some farm and ranch families who cashed in life savings back in 2003 and 2004 or took extra jobs to keep their operations afloat have still not recovered even though the beef trade has largely resumed.

He said preliminary tests suggest the financial impact of the disease has shaken the confidence of some producers, put a strain on marriages or made it less attractive to pass a cattle operation down to sons and daughters.

Dealing with such a calamity on a day-to-day basis also put extreme stress on people, said Billy Thurston, another member of the research team.

"I expect there are going to be a lot of health impacts that haven't been documented," Thurston said.

"Stress means physical health problems because it has been four years since the first case. Also I think we're going to see some social health concerns - increased isolation and the ability to do some social things with a loss of networks and people having to move away."

The Canadian Cattlemen's Association is playing down the long-term impact of BSE on producers.

Rob McNabb, a spokesman for the 90,000-member organization, questioned the need for such a study.

"If they're trying to equate their current stress or financial concerns to BSE, there's really no significant connection," said McNabb, who is general manager of operations for the association.

"And yet I guess we've never fully recovered from the onset of BSE in some of the implications we've had in the industry."


McNabb said farming and ranching have always involved producers lurching from one disaster to the next.

Currently producers are suffering from high feed costs and the impact of the soaring value of the loonie, which makes Canadian beef exports more expensive in key markets such as the United States.

"I would say the current financial crisis in the industry ... is worse than what we went through in 2003 and 2004, which was more about uncertainty and losing money."

But Brook argues that for many producers the BSE crisis is not over, and the ongoing stress and uncertainty needs to be documented.

Families that agree to fill out the questionnaires will be interviewed again in five years to follow up on the study's initial findings.

"Health-care workers need to be aware of these kinds of impacts. Farmers need to be more aware of it as well. We hope to give a really good picture of what's going on across Canada in terms of BSE impact," he said.
http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5izsvHovnXlBIn8hk7HgRxjZfTaXw
 

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Russia asks Canada for electronic verification system for meat imports

MOSCOW. Jan 11


Russia is insisting that Canada implement an electronic verification system for meat deliveries to Russia, Sergei Dankvert, the head of Russia's agricultural watchdog, Rosselkhoznadzor, told Interfax.

Russia's request for the system's implementation is the result of the continuing import to Russia from Canada of meat of unknown origin with falsified veterinary certification.

"Discussion of this problem with Canada has been going on for more than a half year. Furthermore, the last time we discussed this was in November in Canada, however, the system has yet to be developed," Dankvert said. On Friday, he held negotiations with the acting Canadian ambassador to Russia, John Morrison.

Dankvert said that 250 containers of meat from Canada were recently delivered to Vladivostok. However, Canadian authorities have only been able to confirm the authenticity of only 84 veterinary certificates.

"The months when the cargo was in transport was not sufficient to confirm the authenticity of the documentation, and now, the containers remain in port," he said, adding that Rosselkhoznadzor requires veterinary certification for each container.

Dankvert said that Russian veterinary inspectors, as part of investigative efforts, conducted a check on the veterinary certifications, by which Canadian meat and meat production was imported into Russia through the Far East. As a result of the investigation, approximately 1,100 certifications were sent to Canada for confirmation, of which only around 130 were found to be authentic. An additional 270 certificates still await verification, however, Rosselkhoznadzor said that around 200 would not receive confirmation.

Dankvert added: "As of today, Russia is hindering the import of cargo shipments." "There is a system of electronic verification for cargo, which, by the way, we have developed with other countries. It should be implemented," he said. "However, we have no plans to let through production of an unknown origin and with unidentified documentation," Dankvert said.
IH pr (Our editorial staff can be reached at [email protected])

January 11, 2008
What Happens is the RFID tag is retired in Canada at slaughter,and you then have NO traceback to the farm of origin !
They should have used www.ScoringContainers.com
 

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