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Community support for kids

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webfoot

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The wife went to visit her sisters. I had nothing to do so I went into Baker to watch the 4H and FFA kids sell their market animals. To say that this community supports the kids is an understatement. There was over 30 lambs. The top one sold for $15 a pound. There was only 2 that sold for under $10. Goats were bringing $12-15 a pound. There had to be over 40 steers. All big fat steers. The Grand Champion weighed over 1,500 pounds and sold for $6.00 a pound. There was another steer that sold for $6.90. The vast majority of the steers brought over $4.00. The few that didn't make $4 sold in the $3.80-3.90 range. The one i found good was the "market rabbits". Groups of 3 rabbits. The top seller brought $60 a pound! If the rabbits weigh 5 pounds each x 3 rabbits = 15 pounds x $60 = $900! For 3 rabbits.
 

Mountain Cowgirl

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$6 lb for a finished steer or $60 lb for a fat rabbit, how could one decide which to buy? Such a decision. :ROFLMAO: It sounds like some rabbit-raising kid's wealthy grandpa was buying the rabbit. Was the rabbit buyer named Elmer? I think the last name is Fudd. :ROFLMAO:
 

webfoot

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$6 lb for a finished steer or $60 lb for a fat rabbit, how could one decide which to buy? Such a decision. :ROFLMAO: It sounds like some rabbit-raising kid's wealthy grandpa was buying the rabbit. Was the rabbit buyer named Elmer? I think the last name is Fudd. :ROFLMAO:
The steer you could just turn it. Loose money but it is a tax write off. The rabbits they said you couldn't turn then. You bought them they are your rabbits. You get to take them home. It wasn't someone's grandpa who bought the rabbits. An unrelated (as far as I know) mid age lady. She bid $60 but someone else bid $59. Elmer was no where in sight.
 

webfoot

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That’s amazing and wonderful to hear Webfoot. That is rare anymore. Good for the folks from Baker and around the area.
The county has a population of about 16,000. About 10,000 of those live in Baker City. The rest live out in the county. A good number of them are ranchers. Businesses support the kids of their customers. Ranchers support their neighbors kids. I saw a big name Hereford breeder buy a Black Angus steer. And a big name Angus breeder buy a Hereford steer. People pool their money. It is not uncommon to see two or three numbers used on a successful bid.
 

jodywy

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when we were in Lincoln county, they had add-ons. You could fill out a buyer's card and add $5 to whatever for whoever you wanted, that way grandpa could give 8 grandkids each a extra $100. my kids would get a good price on their animals and usually another $700 in add-ons, made for lot more thank you cards. Pulse if you didn't have enough to buy an animal you could still help out a few kids.
 

Mountain Cowgirl

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I was never monied enough to win a 4 H bid, but I did do add-ons. My main contribution to 4 H was teaching at livestock judging clinics. My theory was if they can develop an eye, then at auction buying time or culling time better more profitable decisions will be made. The one-time inflationary money is soon spent, but knowledge will last a lifetime.

I must have got that from my dad because he made me agree that he would give me the steer and I had to buy the feed and do the work and at selling time he would buy it back for market price and we would butcher it. I thank him for that because it taught me the harsh reality of the business.

I wonder if paying kids unrealistic prices for raising an animal is a good thing? Maybe pay them a fair market price and put all the inflationary money up for them in a trust to go to agricultural school or maybe later get started on their own ranch. Make it a donation or free grant for their future and not an unrealistic price for an animal.

My idea is at 4H auctions, there are two expert livestock buyers that bid at first until one wins at a fair market price just as if they were buying the animal to sell for profit. Then that bid is recorded and what the kid will get in cash. Then the inflationary buyers take over and that winning amount over the fair market price is recorded and put in a trust for education or getting into the agriculture business. The inflationary buyers pay the entire amount. The livestock buyers are there just to establish a fair market price.
 
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Mountain Cowgirl

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Doesn't Houston limit how much each individual kid gets and the balance goes into a scholarship fund?
They have a guaranteed amount for each kid's animal, then some get more but only up to a certain amount, and then the rest goes into the Houston Rodeo and Shows General Scholarship Fund that is dispersed, however, and to whomever, the board decides to give it. I think it should go into a special account for the kid that raised the animal. In my opinion, this teaches capitalism rather than socialism.
 

leanin' H

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There is a huge difference in helping a kid out by buying a fat steer for $4500 when the market value is $2800 and the Houston show where the grand champion just sold for a cool million!!!!
Ain’t nothing wrong at all in helping kids. Ranch kids know all too well how damn tough it is to turn a profit with cattle or sheep. When ya start setting up “rules” to tell a kid what to do with their money that ain’t right to me. Parents oughta do some parenting. That’s where the lessons are taught.
 

Mountain Cowgirl

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There is a huge difference in helping a kid out by buying a fat steer for $4500 when the market value is $2800 and the Houston show where the grand champion just sold for a cool million!!!!
Ain’t nothing wrong at all in helping kids. Ranch kids know all too well how damn tough it is to turn a profit with cattle or sheep. When ya start setting up “rules” to tell a kid what to do with their money that ain’t right to me. Parents oughta do some parenting. That’s where the lessons are taught.
I agree that parents ought to do the parenting and teach good solid values, but that isn't always the case. I have found that many kids in 4H don't have very good home lives and don't have the same home structure as many ranch or farm kids. In one case I know where the kid made a thousand at auction and his mom (single parent) took the money to pay off drug debts.

In another case of a ranch kid where the father had a drinking problem and had not paid taxes, the kid's money was taken and used to pay off back taxes. The reason an inflated price is paid is to encourage the kid to stay involved in agriculture and help them build a future, not for the parents to use for their benefit or to pay for their mistakes.

My idea is so the kid gets a fair market price and can do with that money what they want with the parent's oversight, and the overvalue is held for the kid until they are on their own and can use it for education or to get started in building a life.

I once sponsored a 16-year-old girl that didn't have a place to raise a steer. I bought the steer for her, and let her keep it at my place, bought all the feed, paid all expenses, and she did all the work caring for it plus keeping accurate records. Our agreement was when she sold it, she had to pay me back for what I was out in cash, and the rest was hers. She made $600 over what she had to pay me back. Since her mother had taken all the money she made on the lamb she raised the previous year, I set up an account for her. When she sold it at 4 H auction for 3 times its value, I told her to deposit it all in her new account and she owed me nothing. She needed to buy a car since she was 16 and her mother was seldom around and was usually found at the bars.

Her mother tried to sue me for taking control of the girl's money that was really hers since she was the mother. When I showed the judge that I funded the entire project, he told the mother she was way out of order and should thank me for mentoring her daughter, and maybe she should consider getting a job and off welfare and stay out of the bars.

He gave the daughter her emancipation and the money in her account was enough for an old car and an apartment and she got an after-school job at the State Agricultural office and now has 30 years with the main state agriculture dept. She went on to get a bachelor's degree (studying after work and weekend classes) and did it all at her expense, with no grants, gifts, or welfare. It is kids like her that don't have good parents but still have a desire to be part of agriculture, and we as individuals and communities need to help see that these kids can realize their dreams.
 
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