• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

A Golden-Oldie from R-Calf.....

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
Maple Leaf Angus said:
I guess clarity would be too much, maybe? Or too self incriminating?

I tried to make it as clear as possible. What are you confused about? Maybe I need to stick to words 5 letters or less for you? :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
1/7th the cattle and 4 times the amount of reported BSE cases- plus one that was born after the feed ban went into effect-- which include cluster areas that have never been quarantined or satisfactorially explained-- And no way to differentiate ages on cattle OTM--- Pretty well sums it up...

November 17, 2005



U.S. Cattle Producers Disagree with USDA Plans

to Allow into the U.S. Older Canadian Cattle, Beef Products



(Billings, Mont.) – On Wednesday Ron DeHaven, administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), announced the agency plans to revise its bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) restrictions. Under this new proposal, Canadian cattle over 30 months of age would be allowed into the U.S. by mid-2006. R-CALF USA President-Elect Chuck Kiker made the following statement in reaction to this announcement:



“USDA’s plan to lift U.S. import restrictions that would allow Canadian over-thirty-month (OTM) cattle into the U.S. by mid-2006 shows the agency is continuing its push to give market access to our competitors before we regain our lost export markets abroad. In addition, DeHaven’s comments show USDA is ignoring the increased risk these older Canadian cattle pose to the U.S. cattle herd and to U.S. consumers, which is particularly disconcerting because USDA scientists have determined these older Canadian cattle to be of higher risk.



“R-CALF is concerned with the BSE prevalence rate in Canada (4 cases) in relation to that of the United States (1 case). While we praise USDA for its efforts to reopen our beef export markets, its work toward reopening the Japanese market is concentrated around animals 21 months of age and younger. On the other hand, this latest proposal by USDA will allow into the U.S. foreign cattle 30 months of age and older, and the associated beef products from those animals.



“At some point, all countries that import and export cattle and beef products must reach agreement on the highest standards of rules for global beef trade.



“Any effort by the agency to move ahead with these plans not only will increase the financial risks to U.S. cattle producers, but also potentially expose the U.S. to an increased risk of importing BSE into the United States.



“R-CALF’s original case against USDA (filed in January 2005), in our efforts to force the agency to withdraw its Final Rule that allowed into the U.S. younger Canadian cattle, has not yet been resolved. R-CALF is continuing, in federal court, efforts to strengthen our BSE protections, and how our case is resolved will decide whether or not USDA can go forward with a new rule for older cattle. If this case is settled in R-CALF's favor, it obviously would preempt any attempt by USDA to write another rule for older animals.



“R-CALF was granted a preliminary injunction on March 2 that stopped USDA's rule from taking effect on March 7, as the agency had planned, but was overturned on USDA’s appeal in July. Canadian cattle younger than 30 months of age began entering the U.S. on July 18.



“We are still drafting a petition for a court hearing on a permanent ban against Canadian slaughter and feeder cattle. All of the scientific arguments that we used to win the preliminary injunction are even stronger against allowing OTM cattle into the U.S., and even USDA scientists have repeatedly made clear the risk of importing older Canadian cattle into the United States.



“It’s important that beef consumers understand this proposal by USDA makes it more critical than ever to implement Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling at once so consumers can make informed decisions when choosing between USA Beef or foreign beef products for their families.”



# # #



R-CALF USA (Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) represents thousands of U.S. cattle producers on domestic and international trade and marketing issues. R-CALF USA, a national, non-profit organization, is dedicated to ensuring the continued profitability and viability of the U.S. cattle industry. R-CALF USA’s membership consists primarily of cow-calf operators, cattle backgrounders, and feedlot owners. Its members – over 18,000 strong – are located in 47 states, and the organization has over 60 local and state association affiliates, from both cattle and farm organizations. Various main street businesses are associate members of R-CALF USA. For more information, visit www.r-calfusa.com or, call 406-252-2516.
 

TimH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
0
Location
Southwest Manitoba
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Sandhusker - "The answer to your question; YES"

Since you answered yes to the question, it would follow,then, that you believe that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers.
Would that be a fair statement?

YES

Great! You agree that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers,even though BSE has been found in the native herd and not all animals are tested for BSE.
So what is it that insures that this OTM beef is safe for consumption?
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
TimH said:
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Sandhusker - "The answer to your question; YES"

Since you answered yes to the question, it would follow,then, that you believe that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers.
Would that be a fair statement?

YES

Great! You agree that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers,even though BSE has been found in the native herd and not all animals are tested for BSE.
So what is it that insures that this OTM beef is safe for consumption?

Nothing insures anything.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Isn't it funny how R-CALF has no official position on the beef checkoff yet Leo openly states that "there is a problem with the beef checkoff, it is funding anti-cattlemen organizations" and director Herman Schumacher was leading the charge to save producers from their self help program.

Now Sandman says R-CULT doesn't have an official position on OTM cattle while Trade Rep. Dennis McDonald says we shouldn't be slaughtering cattle over 24 months of age if we have native BSE. We had native BSE. Anyone hear anything from Dennis McDonald on this again? Of course not. R-CULT doesn't have that degree of integrity. They make it up as they go to fit their agenda for that day.


Who was it that said, "R-CALF.....don't remind me tomorrow of what I said today".



~SH~
 

TimH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
0
Location
Southwest Manitoba
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Sandhusker said:

Great! You agree that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers,even though BSE has been found in the native herd and not all animals are tested for BSE.
So what is it that insures that this OTM beef is safe for consumption?

Nothing insures anything.

I'll re-word the question. You say that you believe beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers. Why?
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
TimH said:
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Great! You agree that beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers,even though BSE has been found in the native herd and not all animals are tested for BSE.
So what is it that insures that this OTM beef is safe for consumption?

Nothing insures anything.

I'll re-word the question. You say that you believe beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle is safe for consumers. Why?

Because they're only found 1 case here. The odds look pretty good to me.
 

TimH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
0
Location
Southwest Manitoba
Sandhusker- "Because they're only found 1 case here. The odds look pretty good to me."

OK. So how many cases of BSE would have to be discovered ,in the US native herd, before domestic(US) OTM beef would be considered unsafe for consumers?
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
TimH said:
Sandhusker- "Because they're only found 1 case here. The odds look pretty good to me."

OK. So how many cases of BSE would have to be discovered ,in the US native herd, before domestic(US) OTM beef would be considered unsafe for consumers?

Who knows? I certainly don't. I think consumer's reactions would tell you when that level has been reached. So far, we're obviously not there. I doubt if they would take too many more, though.
 

TimH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
0
Location
Southwest Manitoba
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Sandhusker- "Because they're only found 1 case here. The odds look pretty good to me."

OK. So how many cases of BSE would have to be discovered ,in the US native herd, before domestic(US) OTM beef would be considered unsafe for consumers?

Who knows? I certainly don't. I think consumer's reactions would tell you when that level has been reached. So far, we're obviously not there. I doubt if they would take too many more, though.

OK. Since that number is unknown, let's just call it "X". If the number of BSE cases in the native US herd reaches "X", would the beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle still be safe for consumers?
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
TimH said:
Sandhusker said:
TimH said:
Sandhusker- "Because they're only found 1 case here. The odds look pretty good to me."

OK. So how many cases of BSE would have to be discovered ,in the US native herd, before domestic(US) OTM beef would be considered unsafe for consumers?

Who knows? I certainly don't. I think consumer's reactions would tell you when that level has been reached. So far, we're obviously not there. I doubt if they would take too many more, though.

OK. Since that number is unknown, let's just call it "X". If the number of BSE cases in the native US herd reaches "X", would the beef from domestic(US) OTM cattle still be safe for consumers?

I doubt if consumers would see it that way and neither would I.
 

TimH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
0
Location
Southwest Manitoba
Sandhusker- "I doubt if consumers would see it that way and neither would I."

If the number of BSE positives in the native US herd reached "X", how would you see it , then?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Sandman: "I doubt if consumers would see it that way and neither would I."

Go ahead Tim, I'll let you drop the inconsistancy hammer!

Watch out, he's a slime ball.


What's NCBA's policy?

On what?



~SH~
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
~SH~ said:
Sandman: "I doubt if consumers would see it that way and neither would I."

Go ahead Tim, I'll let you drop the inconsistancy hammer!

Watch out, he's a slime ball.


What's NCBA's policy?

On what?



~SH~

On what? On the same thing you just got on me about R-CALF not having a policy!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I don't know whether they do or don't. What matters is that they don't have a representative presenting an opinion that doesn't support policy like your beloved R-CULT.

John Kerry: "First I voted for it, then I voted against it"


~SH~
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
~SH~ said:
I don't know whether they do or don't. What matters is that they don't have a representative presenting an opinion that doesn't support policy like your beloved R-CULT.

John Kerry: "First I voted for it, then I voted against it"


~SH~

If you don't know if they do or don't, why are you getting on R-CALF for not having one? :roll:

NCBA trumped Dennis - they have leadership who presented policy that was against what membership actually drafted and voted on.

Who are you to be throwing stones?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Why didn't R-CULT membership collar Dennis McDonald for jeoprodizing their slaughter cow market? The R-CULTers in attendance probably nodded their heads in agreement like horses fighting face flies.

BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

I have yet to see any of R-CULT's membership challenge anything their leaders say. What Leo and Bill say today are today's marching orders.

BAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!


~SH~
 

Sandhusker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
18,486
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
~SH~ said:
Why didn't R-CULT membership collar Dennis McDonald for jeoprodizing their slaughter cow market? The R-CULTers in attendance probably nodded their heads in agreement like horses fighting face flies.

BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

I have yet to see any of R-CULT's membership challenge anything their leaders say. What Leo and Bill say today are today's marching orders.

BAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!


~SH~

Who's to say he wasn't collered when he got back to Billings?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Sandman: "Who's to say he wasn't collered when he got back to Billings?"

HAHAHA!

I'd say Leo's public defense of Debryuckers buying supposedly unsafe Canadian cattle is a pretty good indication that nobody from R-CULT is collared for any of their actions or statements.

Baaaaaaaaaahhh!

R-CULT's leaders are more worried about coming up with pubic defenses for their contradictions than correcting anything.

I have never seen any R-CULT representative corrected for anything they state by another R-CULT representative. They figure out ways to divert the issue, just like you.


~SH~
 

Latest posts

Top