• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Another bull

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
419
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
60fa9871.jpg


This is a 3-year old bull that came from Kit Pharo's sale. We bought him as a coming 2-year old and used him last year and this. Just thought someone might be interested to see how they look.

He's pretty deep, though a little slight in the behind. We bought him because we like his pedigree. Old Rito 0203 and Papa Durabull. His calves look pretty good. Guess time will tell.
 

Jinglebob

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
5,962
Reaction score
0
Location
Western South Dakota
I'd use that bull. There is more money in the loins than in the butt. 'Course thats just me and the kind'a of cattle I like. Deep and thick looks better to me than long, tall and skinny. :lol:
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
419
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
Don't know what he weighs, but we could weigh him on our scale under the chute. He is in close for awhile until we get everything situated after giving preconditioning shots. As far as we're concerned, a bull never needs to weigh over a ton, regardless of how old he is. We are striving for MODERATE.

Jinglebob, that is an interesting concept. Hadn't heard that one before. Makes sense! I know we quit the long, tall (and generally narrow) bulls because we do not want long, tall (and generally narrow) cows. We have found that a bull needs to have a belly for the cows to have capacity. Anyhow, that is just our thought, but it seems to be working for us and the type of cattle we want.

Thanks, guys!
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
419
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
One other little thing...people seem to be obsessed with Angus bulls having some butt. Angus are known for the cows (maternal). Seems to me when you put a real butt on something, you go from a maternal breed to a paternal breed (Limousin, Charolais, etc.).

I haven't heard this from anyone, it is just my own observation. Why do we want to take the maternal (fertility, etc.) out of Angus for paternal (growth, etc.) characteristics?

What is it Kit says? Something about when sitting in a church pew the men should touch at the shoulders and the women should touch at the hips.

It seems to me that the more maternal bulls (the ones that sire good replacement females) don't carry as much butt as paternal bulls.

I hope I have opened some discussion on this. I am interested in hearing what others have to say.
 

Jinglebob

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
5,962
Reaction score
0
Location
Western South Dakota
Faster horses said:
One other little thing...people seem to be obsessed with Angus bulls having some butt. Angus are known for the cows (maternal). Seems to me when you put a real butt on something, you go from a maternal breed to a paternal breed (Limousin, Charolais, etc.).

I haven't heard this from anyone, it is just my own observation. Why do we want to take the maternal (fertility, etc.) out of Angus for paternal (growth, etc.) characteristics?

What is it Kit says? Something about when sitting in a church pew the men should touch at the shoulders and the women should touch at the hips.

It seems to me that the more maternal bulls (the ones that sire good replacement females) don't carry as much butt as paternal bulls.

I hope I have opened some discussion on this. I am interested in hearing what others have to say.

Years back we went to crossing with Terentaise(sp). They were very maternal and that is when we first started to getting cattle that would calve at about a year and a half. The calves would get bred while still on the cows. We got great looking heifers but the steers would have a narrow peaked butt and big belliesby weanng time. I never thought about it until your post. Sure got some dandy cows and you sure didn't want to try and tag their calves. They were REAL good mama's! :lol:
 

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2005
Messages
367
Reaction score
0
Location
northeast nebraska
ok--here's a question for you guys. first, i liked the bull, tho he doesn't have much round on him (and that's worth money, too, BTW. but not as much as a loin, and THAT only applies if you sell the fats grade/yield). anyway, what about this theory: smaller rounds go with these post-legged cattle.

i don't know, i'm just throwing it out there. and i wonder if, when a person only uses a bull for a very few years, then that post-legged (in my own mind, mind you) problem doesn't really come into play, cause he's gone before his hind legs give out, but it'll come back to haunt you in any heifers you keep.

what's the consensus?
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
419
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
Too much 'camped under' is called 'sickle hocked' in horses and I think it is called the same in bulls. I don't care for sickle hocks AT ALL.

Our daughter has a horse that was post-legged as a colt. He has been unrideable for years because he is not sound in the hind. I think it all relates to the straightness in his hind legs. He almost stands with his hind legs out behind him.
 

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2005
Messages
367
Reaction score
0
Location
northeast nebraska
yeah, i would take a post-legged bull over a camped-under, but i think as an industry, we're getting TOO post-legged. a good, i don't know, 45 degree angle at the hock, seems to me like the best to stand up to LONG use. not only, but especially, in the commercial (sp?) cow herd--i mean, what are you people banking on?--long-lived, productive cows, right?, but also in the feedlot.

which is where the commercial cow-calf producers make their $$--in repeat buyers for their calves because their calves out-perform the others. and post-legged cattle, it seems to me, can't take the feedyard conditions anymore than post-legged cattle can take pasture conditions.
 

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,263
Reaction score
51
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
Gee, if a person listened too much to everyone's personal pet peeves, he could go to an early grave worrying himself to death. From post legs to camped under legs, from pipes in chutes to you name it, there is a whole lot to WORRY about. Heck, a feller has to die from something. Guess I'll just try to remember, "all things in moderation." :)

Up until about ten years ago, we fed all stacked hay. This was accomplished by cabling a half of a six-ton stack onto a four-wheeled "hay-sled". To feed it off, I'd always put the tractor in low gear, secure the steering wheel so it traveled straight, and then get off while the tractor was moving slowly across a field. By stepping on the tongue of the moving haysled and then stepping onto the stationary ground, a person had to walk carefully to avoid falling down in front of the oncoming sled. Then you grabbed a "drag-fork" (a pitchfork with bent over tines), and started pulling the hay from the stack and dumping it in small, efficiently eaten piles. It worked slick, and the cattle stayed gentle because you were always walking among them, feeding them as you walked along. It was a good system, but OSHA and ol' worry wart Ralph Nader sure wouldn't have approved.

There are certain things a person can do to minimize risk, but all the legislation in the world won't eliminate all risk. Life is a gamble, but it sure is fun. Go for the gusto. :)
 

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2005
Messages
367
Reaction score
0
Location
northeast nebraska
ditto to FH, soapweed. however, there ARE some things more important than others in the "worry line-up". it's up to each individual to decide what those priorities are--at least in this country. god bless america.
 

PPRM

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,963
Reaction score
11
Location
NE Oregon
Crap Soap, LOL, I say that jokingly, but of all the things to post to the new forum nagger, LOl.

See, When I was in the sixth grade, I lost one of my best freinds from a tractor acident, but I won't go into that.....

I am not normally considered a OSHA safety freak. Heck, half the time my seatbelt is off, the other half it's only on cause I don't want a ticket and I remember. Usually my truck is in gear and going down the road as I try to fumble it on.........


You just happened to hit two of three things that hit a nerve in me. Pipes, tractor safety and the third is the position of the rear cinch on a horse,


On the Bull, I still would like to see him move before passing judgement. It doesn't look like he is standing natural to me, again like maybe he stopped funny because of you taking a picture,

PPRM
 

Cal

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
3,598
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern SD
Good job FH. Could you post the blood lines. You probably did and I'm hurrying through here and missed it. :)
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
419
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
His sire is a son of the old Rito F0203 and out of a Papa Durabull daughter.

I thought I posted the bloodlines somewhere, but I can't find the post either. I bought him sight unseen because of the bloodlines he carries.
He throws really nice calves, as we used him on a few cows last year, so now we know.
 

Latest posts

Top