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Beef Recall in Wisconsin

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Bill

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If it was over 30 months how was it imported from Canada?
 

Mike

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Bill said:
If it was over 30 months how was it imported from Canada?

The health certificate accompanying the animal was not accurate, as determined by the audit.

This is one of the reasons I say REMOVE ALL SRM's, TEST ALL CATTLE, and we wouldn't be having these articles that decay consumer confidence.

It's not the BSE that is hurting us. It's the dang media, and the ones like the USDA giving them something to write about! I do have to give the USDA credit for catching this mistake before the beef got in the food chain.
 

Shelly

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Uh, correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't all the cattle checked out before they cross the border? Could the inspectors not tell a cow from a fattened heifer? Just wondering.
 

redriver

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It was probably owned by a member of r-cult, and they falsified the age records to sneak it across the border. They are used to lying about everything else, and those crooks were buying feeders right after the border was closed, so the age is about right.
 

PORKER

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From what I know an heard is that most of the USDA BORDER import checkpoints that APHIS vets work at, DO NOT have even ONE RFID reader on hand to check Canadian ID cattle coming across the border from Maine to Washington as of the end of July. Its just stupid.
 
A

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Could this be a reason that Montana wanted Montana vets and inspectors to check cattle coming in :wink:

Canadian Border open only a month to live cattle and we're already having USDA screwups and meat recalls....Really gives a fellow confidence.....
 

PORKER

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I figured that at least the inspectors would have a barcode reader an a RFID reader with access to the Canadian DATABASE for PROOF.
 

Bill

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Oh well it's just a drop in the bucket to the hundreds of thousands of US originating "just over" thirty months that have been killed on a UTM line and had a few T-Bones slip through. I doubt that this is the first one from that plant that has had a few bone fragments slip through.
 

PORKER

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At least the US. inspectors would need to have a barcode reader an a RFID reader with access to the Canadian DATABASE for PROOF of farm of ORIGIN and the animals age since all Canadian are TAGGED.
 

the chief

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redriver said:
It was probably owned by a member of r-cult, and they falsified the age records to sneak it across the border. They are used to lying about everything else, and those crooks were buying feeders right after the border was closed, so the age is about right.

:???: :???: :???:
Intelligence is not your forte', is it?
 

redriver

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the chief said:
redriver said:
It was probably owned by a member of r-cult, and they falsified the age records to sneak it across the border. They are used to lying about everything else, and those crooks were buying feeders right after the border was closed, so the age is about right.

:???: :???: :???:
Intelligence is not your forte', is it?

Obviously living with your head in the sand is your forte'. It's a documented fact that americans, and especially r-cult members bought feeders after the border closed. They thought they could take advantage of Canadian ranchers' plight, but r-cult kept the border closed too long and the jerks were forced to send them to the packing plants in Alberta. It was big news as Canadian ranchers blocked some of the trucks. But I guess when you live in the good ol' USofA and only watch the propeganda that passes for news down there, you may have missed it, that is IF you pulled your head out of your ass long enough to watch your propeganda.
 

Bill

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PORKER said:
At least the US. inspectors would need to have a barcode reader an a RFID reader with access to the Canadian DATABASE for PROOF of farm of ORIGIN and the animals age since all Canadian are TAGGED.
I heard that the US bar code readers only understand American and can't read Canadian! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Sandhusker

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Oldtimer said:
Could this be a reason that Montana wanted Montana vets and inspectors to check cattle coming in :wink:

Canadian Border open only a month to live cattle and we're already having USDA screwups and meat recalls....Really gives a fellow confidence.....

You can add this to the long list of USDA actions that put a smear on US cattlemen's attempts to be viewed as the world's provider of premiere product. You would think we would be used to it and even expect it anymore. :roll:
 

Mike

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Sandhusker said:
Oldtimer said:
Could this be a reason that Montana wanted Montana vets and inspectors to check cattle coming in :wink:

Canadian Border open only a month to live cattle and we're already having USDA screwups and meat recalls....Really gives a fellow confidence.....

You can add this to the long list of USDA actions that put a smear on US cattlemen's attempts to be viewed as the world's provider of premiere product. You would think we would be used to it and even expect it anymore. :roll:

The checkoff might need to raised to $5 per head to combat the inept actions of the USDA lately. :???: :wink: :roll: :shock:
 

fedup2

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Statement: “We have a drought here”..typical response “ R-Calf must be seeding the clouds on the other side of the border so they can steal our land!” ….“The feeder cattle market dropped again today” “ R-Calf is doing it so they can steal our cattle”
“I’m feeling a little under the weather today” …“Me to, R-Calf has me so mad that I can’t $hit!”
“Tyson posted their 4th quarter earnings & showed record profits. Says its from increased margins from Canadian cattle”..G-damn R-Calf…bwame the packers!….
“R-calf didn’t buy your cattle, the packers did!”….”Ya but R-Calf held our arms so the packers could screw us!” ….bwame the packers!” “G-damn R-Calf!”
“Fuel is so expensive that I’m going to have to feed with horses this winter while the oil company’s are making record profits!” ….”Its only good business! Bwame the oil companys!” “G-damn R-Calf!
 
A

Anonymous

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Canada violates US mad cow rules, ships adult cow By Randy Fabi




WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Canadian animal health inspectors accidentally approved the export of a 31-month-old cow to the United States, violating strict U.S. safeguards to prevent mad cow disease, a U.S. Agriculture Department official said on Monday.


The mistake prompted a Wisconsin meat plant late Friday to recall voluntarily 1,856 pounds of beef that may contain the backbone of the imported cow.

The USDA said some of the meat may have already been consumed.

"It is very, very unlikely that this product would cause illness," said Steven Cohen, spokesman for USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. "We are still investigating how much may still be available and if any retailers received it."

The United States prohibits the skull, spinal cord and vertebral column from domestic and imported cattle older than 30 months of age in the food supply. These materials are considered the most risky for spreading bovine spongiform encephalopathy ( BSE).

The USDA last month reopened U.S. borders to imports of young Canadian cattle, ending a two-year ban imposed after Canada's first domestic case of mad cow disease.

Cohen said the adult cow did not show any signs of sickness when imported into the United States.

Green Bay Dressed Beef in Wisconsin processed the meat on August 4 and distributed it to wholesale distributors in Pennsylvania, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

The products were sold under the American Foods Group and Dakota Supreme Beef brands and had an establishment number 410 on each box.

The USDA said the health certificate accompanying the cow was presented to the Wisconsin plant and it appeared complete and accurate.

However, a subsequent audit by Canadian officials found the information to be inaccurate. "Action has been taken by Canadian Food Inspection Agency officials in response to findings from the audit," the USDA said.
 

Bill

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Oldtimer said:
Canada violates US mad cow rules, ships adult cow By Randy Fabi




WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Canadian animal health inspectors accidentally approved the export of a 31-month-old cow to the United States, violating strict U.S. safeguards to prevent mad cow disease, a U.S. Agriculture Department official said on Monday.


The mistake prompted a Wisconsin meat plant late Friday to recall voluntarily 1,856 pounds of beef that may contain the backbone of the imported cow.

The USDA said some of the meat may have already been consumed.

"It is very, very unlikely that this product would cause illness," said Steven Cohen, spokesman for USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. "We are still investigating how much may still be available and if any retailers received it."

The United States prohibits the skull, spinal cord and vertebral column from domestic and imported cattle older than 30 months of age in the food supply. These materials are considered the most risky for spreading bovine spongiform encephalopathy ( BSE).

The USDA last month reopened U.S. borders to imports of young Canadian cattle, ending a two-year ban imposed after Canada's first domestic case of mad cow disease.

Cohen said the adult cow did not show any signs of sickness when imported into the United States.

Green Bay Dressed Beef in Wisconsin processed the meat on August 4 and distributed it to wholesale distributors in Pennsylvania, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

The products were sold under the American Foods Group and Dakota Supreme Beef brands and had an establishment number 410 on each box.

The USDA said the health certificate accompanying the cow was presented to the Wisconsin plant and it appeared complete and accurate.

However, a subsequent audit by Canadian officials found the information to be inaccurate. "Action has been taken by Canadian Food Inspection Agency officials in response to findings from the audit," the USDA said.
Accidents happen. If she hadn't been Canadian she would have slid right through just like all the 31 month old American cattle have since Dec. 2003.
 

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