• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Beef rule heading to court

Help Support Ranchers.net:

A

Anonymous

Guest
Beef rule heading to court
By JIM GRANSBERY
Of The Gazette Staff

A last-ditch effort to keep the U.S. border closed to Canadian live cattle under 30 months of age and beef will play out in federal district court in Billings Wednesday.

A request for an injunction against the U.S. Department of Agriculture from implementing its "final rule" on the risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or "mad cow" disease, in the Canadian cattle herd will be heard from 8 a.m. to noon before federal Judge Richard Cebull.

R-CALF, a national cattlemen's group based in Billings, seeks the injunction until its lawsuit against USDA's final rule can be heard.


"The way I see it happening is the judge will grant a temporary restraining order before Friday," said Leo McDonnell Jr., president of R-CALF. "Then there will be a hearing on the injunction request about mid-March.

"That will be the full-blown deal with all the witnesses," he said.

Wednesday's hearing will feature attorneys representing R-CALF and the federal government, he said.

The USDA in late December issued its final rule on cattle and beef imports from Canada, labeling the country as "minimal risk" for BSE and setting March 7 as the date to resume trade. Trade was shut off in May 2003 when Canada announced it had a BSE-infected cow in Alberta. Since the setting of the March 7 deadline, Canada has announced two other cases of BSE in its cow herd.

R-CALF says its lawsuit contains volumes of scientific data that suggest Canada's risk status should not be considered "minimal." The USDA's only risk assessment of the possibility of importing BSE or having BSE spread because of trade with Canada is "low" and USDA did not define low, R-CALF argues.

Additionally, the final rule contains several substantial changes from the preliminary rule, and these changes have never been subject to public or industry comment, the cattlemen's group says.

McDonnell said he expects a ruling in R-CALF's favor will be appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

"I don't know if we can get this resolved, McDonnell said. "We are trying to keep pressure on Congress."

The final rule is subject to congressional review, but Congress appears unlikely to act despite the efforts of Montana's delegation and other cattle-producing states to revoke the rule.

The USDA on Monday released a report that the Canadian cattle industry is in compliance with its ban on ruminant-derived proteins in cattle feed.

Canada and the United States banned ruminant protein in cattle feed in 1997 in response to the BSE outbreak in Great Britain. Scientists believe the ruminant-based feed carried deformed proteins called prions that led to a human form of BSE in those who consumed BSE-infected tissues.

About 150 people have died in the United Kingdom from variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and another 11 people have died elsewhere in Europe.

In December 2003, a cow in Washington state was discovered to have BSE, but the cow had come from Canada. Nevertheless, most foreign customers of U.S. beef closed their borders to further U.S. exports. Since that time, the United States has tried to convince its trading partners that U.S. beef is safe and resumption of trade should occur.

Japan, the largest buyer of U.S. beef, has agreed to open is borders to beef from cattle from 14 to 17 months old, but has not provided a specific date for the resumption of trade.

Most U.S. agricultural organizations oppose any opening of the U.S. border to Canadian live cattle until Japan and other foreign customers resume buying U.S. beef.

R-CALF USA (Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) represents its U.S. cattle producer-members on domestic and international trade and marketing issues.

Its membership consists primarily of cow-calf operators, cattle backgrounders, and feedlot owners. Its members, more than 12,000, are located in 44 states.
 

Tommy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
755
Reaction score
0
Location
South East Kansas
The NCBA came up with resolutions on conditions of the border being opened out of their convention. One of these was the US must reach an agreement with Japan, South Korea, and Mexico to take our beef and beef by-products before the border should be opened up to Canada.

If this is so, then they should be applauding R-CALF's efforts to keep it closed. Because we do not have a deal with Japan or Korea yet to take our beef, and if there is no injunction the border will be open Mar. 7 .
 

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Tommy said:
The NCBA came up with resolutions on conditions of the border being opened out of their convention. One of these was the US must reach an agreement with Japan, South Korea, and Mexico to take our beef and beef by-products before the border should be opened up to Canada.

If this is so, then they should be applauding R-CALF's efforts to keep it closed. Because we do not have a deal with Japan or Korea yet to take our beef, and if there is no injunction the border will be open Mar. 7 .

The NCBA has been talking a good story,and that bought them some time ,but like the ole saying goes "you can sheist some of the people some of the time not all the people all the time" IM waiting.............good luck
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tommy: "If this is so, then they should be applauding R-CALF's efforts to keep it closed. Because we do not have a deal with Japan or Korea yet to take our beef, and if there is no injunction the border will be open Mar. 7 ."

You are still trying to draw comparisons between R-CALF's position and the NCBA's position on the Canadian border opening when there is none.

R-CALF wants no Canadian imports, period.

NCBA wants normalized trade.

There is no comparison so why would NCBA support R-CALF's efforts to stop any trade? NCBA sees the bigger picture of normalized trade while R-CALF doesn't even know the value of our export markets.


~SH~
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cattle Market Comments - Ann Barnhardt

3/1/2005 2:41:00 PM


Low-Carb Market Wrap



Cattle finished 40-60 higher after a solid session. Feeders likewise finished 35-70 higher having never traded lower on the day. The cutout printed higher at noon, albeit on non-impressive volume. Attitudes remain positive and quite a bit of hope is in the market that something will come from tomorrow's Montana court proceedings. In general, I feel that the market will have difficulty sustaining rallies. Too many producers are crouched and ready to jump all over rallies in the futures markets.
 

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
prarie dog erroroneously stated,R-CALF wants no Canadian imports, period.

LISTEN CLOSELY PRARIE DOG R CALF WANTS FAIR TRADE AND THE AMERICAN CATTLE MAN IS DEMANDING IT................good luck
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
Remind me what is R-calf's definition of fair trade. Maybe they should be fighting the NAFTA, I think all the rules needed are written in there. So, they should be challenging those rules.
 

sw

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
1,373
Reaction score
0
So very sorry, SH is right. Was in Albertsons tonight before coming home, they could care less about R-Calf behind the meat counter because I make it a point to stop and ask what is going on in their end of the business. ALL of these cow /calf producers that do not sell their product to a feedlot that sells to a packer that sells to a grocery store should do the same. YOU ARE IN THE BEEF BUSINESS. Try to educate yourselves. The consumer is the person to please, but I am tired of R-Calf saying that the beef that I produce is probably contaminated as is the CDN.
I need to also add this, the only time that I have spent in my entire life, except for college, that was animal science to a Masters level, was in a jerky plant. We got beef in 50# boxes as to the country of origin, as it was my job to thaw meat, unload trucks with meat, and spice all of the meat cut for the day. Meat from Mexico could be mixed with meat from Canada, Australia, New Zealand or the US. It was my job to mix the meat accordingly to get a consistant meat to fat ratio. How do you label that? ONKNOWN. This is cull cows and bulls, if you don't know this, it is roughly 1/4 of your income for a year. So, Do you want your beef labeled as unknown? I don't, as of April 1 my beef is going to be labeled as Montana Branded Beef, voluntary. With traceback, verification of age, and labeled as such. It is time to stop all of this BS and give the consumer what they want, we are going to give them what they want. If we fail, then M-COOL and R-CALF can laugh all they want, we are giving the consumer what they want. I also know that they are hoping for us to fail; :mad:
 

rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,059
Reaction score
0
Notice membership just jumped 1000.

(Billings, Mont.) – “Tomorrow, on March 2, 2005, the R-CALF USA will go before U.S. District Judge Richard F. Cebull, presiding over the U.S. District Court for the District of Montana, to seek a preliminary injunction to block the reopening of the Canadian border to imports of Canadian beef and cattle.



“I am disappointed that cattle farmers and ranchers have to resort to legal action in order to protect their industry from the inappropriate and premature actions of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), but these are the circumstances our industry faces, and here are the reasons we are taking this extraordinary action:



American consumers are entitled to the safest food products possible.
The U.S. cattle industry provides the safest and most wholesome beef in the world.
Canada now has a BSE problem, documented by four confirmed cases of BSE in its native cattle herd.
USDA now has a responsibility to protect the U.S. food supply and the U.S. cattle industry from the BSE risk presented by Canada.
USDA is not fulfilling this responsibility. The agency is not following the more stringent safeguards recommended by international science, nor is USDA following the more stringent safeguards practiced by every other country in the world affected by BSE.
USDA’s actions are placing the U.S. cattle industry at risk from a loss of consumer confidence in the U.S. beef supply.


“We have called on USDA to meet with us to find solutions to the BSE problem in Canada. We have called for a solution that ensures the U.S. does not adopt BSE standards lower than international standards and lower than the rest of the world, as this would make the U.S. a dumping ground for products other countries won’t accept.



“USDA responded on Dec. 29, 2004, by issuing its Final Rule, a rule that fails to address the legitimate concerns posed by R-CALF USA.



“We hope the Court, like U.S. cattle producers, will recognize that USDA’s actions present an unnecessary and avoidable risk to the United States."



# # #



R-CALF USA (Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) represents thousands of U.S. cattle producers on domestic and international trade and marketing issues. R-CALF USA, a national, non-profit organization, is dedicated to ensuring the continued profitability and viability of the U.S. cattle industry. R-CALF USA’s membership consists primarily of cow-calf operators, cattle backgrounders, and feedlot owners. Its members – over 13,000 strong – are located in 45 states, and the organization has over 57 local and state association affiliates, from both cattle and farm organizations. Various main street businesses are associate members of R-CALF USA. For more information, visit www.r-calfusa.com or, call 406-252-2516.
 

Big Muddy rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
22,170
Reaction score
400
Location
Big Muddy valley
That's because they give a "FREE ONE YEAR MEMBERSHIP" with a fifty dollar donation. Wonder what the "FREE " mebership costs with out the donation. :cowboy:
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
Once again R-calf has called into question US food safety. Things that make you go Hmmmm!

I missed where thay have said there's over a couple of million head of native Canadian head in the US already that are hitting the human food chain!

don't cry WOLF!, too often, that same wolf might get you!

Hey SH, good job of protecting the industry from those crying wolf!
 

Tommy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
755
Reaction score
0
Location
South East Kansas
SH...You are still trying to draw comparisons between R-CALF's position and the NCBA's position on the Canadian border opening when there is none.

Wrong again about me Scott.

I am trying to figure out what the NCBA is doing about their resolution. They specifically stated that they want trade with Japan, Korea, and Mexico resumed before the Canadian border is opened.
We do not have a market with Japan or Korea and not fully with Mexico. So are their resolutions just words? Or are they doing something to keep the border closed untill we have normalized trade with Japan, Korea, and Mexico?
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
Jan Lyon sat on TV and said that Mexico agreed to take from the US what ever the US was takeing from Canada so if that is true and you want that market open there is one thing to do. normalize trade between the US and Canada.
 

SASH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
567
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Manitoba
From what I understand, the judge is only allowed to rule on whether the USDA followed proper procedure. Everything else. All the arguments about economics or beef safety are null and void.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tam said:
Jan Lyon sat on TV and said that Mexico agreed to take from the US what ever the US was takeing from Canada so if that is true and you want that market open there is one thing to do. normalize trade between the US and Canada.

When was this Tam- During NCBA's first policy- back in the North American industry days? or their second policy after they had to dump all their old policy or lose all their members? or now when nobody knows where they set? ~SH~ talks about flip flops in organizations...NCBA is mysteriously very quiet-- maybe they think the dog and pony show at convention was enough to save them....I'm waiting to see what they say if it is now true and becomes public that Japan is blocking out US beef because of the danger of Canadian beef imports....
 

Latest posts

Top