• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Beef Up Food Security

Help Support Ranchers.net:

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Beef Up Food Security

Implement more RFID tagging of livestock.
Roger Viadero, a former FBI agent and inspector general in the USDA, touts the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tagging to improve the traceability of animals through the food chain.

Viadero, now managing director for agribusiness at Navigant Consulting, works with RFID systems from Syscan. "We can track a product from the birth pen right through Stop & Shop," he says, referring to a large supermarket chain. So if a porterhouse steak in the meat case is found to be contaminated, it can be traced backward through the food chain, all the way to the animal it came from; bad hamburger might be detected before it reaches the store, preventing the need for an expensive recall.

In May, the government backed the animal-tracking system idea with a draft plan that would identify animals from birth to death, using technologies such as RFID or retinal scanning. But convincing industry to adopt RFID technology now is a tough sell, Viadero says, because of concerns about added costs. For the consumer, he says, RFID may add up to 7 cents to the cost of a pound of meat. "The industry says it's going to put us out of business—they're afraid the consumer will eat less. I don't know about you, but I'd spend a nickel more for source-verified meat," he says.

Who Should Protect Our Food?
Want to see just how hard it is to figure out who should pay to protect our food supply?

Read "Dueling for Dollars".
Establish a neighborhood-watch program for the sector.
In Ford County, Kan., law enforcement, veterinarians and others have launched a neighborhood watch–style program to mitigate the threat of agroterrorism. James Lane, the undersheriff for Ford County since 2001 and a former security head at a beef-packing plant, says the program, called Agroguard, encourages cowboys, farmers, feedlot workers and others involved in the food chain to keep their eyes and ears open to suspicious activity and to report it.

So if a strange car pulls off the road near a pasture, a cowboy can dial 1-800-KSCRIME and report the license plate number of the car. "We need to understand this is about risk management," Lane says. "There are applications that make sense and those that don't. For us to tell feed yards that they need to install electronic devices like CCTV or biodetectors doesn't really make sense. We're talking about a very harsh environment, hundreds of acres. It's not like you're trying to secure a building. So you have to understand your best asset is the people," he says.

In Ford County—where there are some 1,250 farms, more than 20 feeder facilities, two slaughterhouses and nearly 10 times as many cattle as people—local industry is still hurting from a Japanese ban on American beef exports after a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy or BSE (also known as mad-cow disease) from an imported cow reached Washington State in 2003. (The cattle industry received more bad news this June when a beef cow born and bred in Texas tested positive for BSE. Taiwan reimposed a ban on U.S. beef imports only three months after lifting an earlier one.)

Lane emphasizes that building partnerships is key to agroterrorism prevention across the Midwest. "Local law enforcement must become partners with industry—historically, there has never been partnership. Second, law enforcement and animal health and public health officials must sit down and work together," he says.

Lane and Agroguard are ahead of the pack in thinking about mitigating the risk to the food supply, says Nevil Speer, an associate professor of animal science in Western Kentucky University's agriculture department. "Agroguard to me is the very best system we could use to try and prevent [an attack]. We need to take that thing nationwide."

Work with suppliers to improve security controls.
Mark Cheviron, corporate vice president and director of security and services for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), says one of the most important steps in food chain security is to know who your suppliers are.

ADM, one of the biggest agricultural processors in the world, turns crops into food ingredients, animal feed ingredients and renewable fuels. Cheviron says that when a supplier drives a load of grain to a grain elevator, the vehicle is checked and the driver is given a pass, which he then gives to a person at the dumping site. If the grain is loaded onto a railcar, the car is sealed and the seal is checked when loaded and unloaded. If the seal is broken, the receiver won't accept it, says Cheviron. The same holds true for finished products such as sweetener. If the seal is broken, the customer—Coke, for example—will reject the whole car. Trucks are sealed as well.

At ADM's processing plants, food safety has always been an important issue. "It wasn't 9/11 that sparked that; it was the Tylenol case," he says, referring to the 1982 tampering incident. But the company did undertake a thorough review of its security following 9/11. A 2003 letter provided by Cheviron (headed "To whom it may concern" and signed by ADM President and COO Paul Mulhollem) cites measures such as improved perimeter protection and access controls, and the sealing of empty bulk containers to reduce the possibility of contamination of a container before it's reloaded.
 

STAFF

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
178
Reaction score
0
Location
Sarasota Florida
Establish a neighborhood-watch program for the sector.
In Ford County, Kan., law enforcement, veterinarians and others have launched a neighborhood watch–style program to mitigate the threat of agroterrorism. James Lane, the undersheriff for Ford County since 2001 and a former security head at a beef-packing plant, says the program, called Agroguard, encourages cowboys, farmers, feedlot workers and others involved in the food chain to keep their eyes and ears open to suspicious activity and to report it.
We have put together a new communications system for just this purpose worldwide as per this press release.

Rapid Response System to Pandemics, Plant and Animal Disease, and Catastrophic Events Built by ScoringSystem, Inc.

This new secure communications system has been developed by ScoringSystem, Inc. as a unique records application feature of the company’s secure Web-based ScoringAg database.

A Web-based emergency response system is an essential tool for rapidly and accurately reporting critical disease outbreaks and disaster situations. This effective rapid response system can focus attention on emergencies early enough to identify the exact critical nature of the situation and speed necessary services to the site. Quick responses can minimize or even eliminate the large loss of life that is often associated with the usual inaccurate, inadequate, and late response experienced when an emergency response system is not used.

ScoringSystem’s rapid response system enables health inspection officials to track emergency situation data in real time with precise location information provided by using ScoringSystem’s PIDC worldwide premises code, and including up-to-date photos, video, and inspection records all on the same Site-Specific Recordkeeping™ Web page. ScoringSystem’s Web-based central server provides a single "clearinghouse" with record pages for rapidly reporting and collaborating on critical information by emergency response groups and others around the world.

Without ScoringSystem’s unique central server and Web-based system, there is often no way to share collective knowledge about an emergency, whether a disease outbreak or bio-terrorism. Even if officials are somehow all aware of the situation, and there is no central system, it can be a matter of days or weeks until all the facts are known to everyone and their reviews are collected and summarized. By then it is usually much to late.

With ScoringAg’s Location Record Web pages every plant and animal health inspection official can document the situation with Web-based records in real time with picture and video. Then, all emergency response team personnel can review emergency report data, photos, and video of the situation in real time, directly from the on-site report. Other offline databases and local software systems in use today for collecting and storing information on animal and plant diseases are scattered around the world and are usually unable to communicate with each other or exchange information to show the complete situation.

The ScoringSystem emergency response Web pages use a 2D DataMatrix barcode label that can be printed onsite, so that Nokia, Sendo, Siemans, Sony Ericsson, and other cell phones (using Semacode imaging software) can decode the barcode and go directly to ScoringSystem’s database and emergency record Web page in real time. With Site-Specific Recordkeeping ™ the event can be shared anywhere, while the 128-bit encrypted system maintains security for the Chain of Command under control of the appointed Gatekeeper.

All members of the emergency response team, as well as specialists in the animal and plant diseases, and other scientists and officials, can share data, picture/video about suspicious or death animals or plants instantaneously with their scientific and official colleagues, allowing rapid analysis and conclusions to speed the diagnosis and action taken. Real time actions can stop these traumatic events easier and get the Recovery teams into action quicker and well informed.

Since it is Web-based, ScoringSystem’s system can be deployed to every country in the world, running in Unicode with the ability to handle all keyboard language setups. The system would enable international groups, such as OIE, APHIS, ORISA, and WHO, to move at a moments notice to take action in the field immediately when the emergency occurs. Local, state, and federal officials and infrastructures can be connected and stay coordinated via the Gatekeeper.

Many other types of events types can be handled by ScoringSystem’s response system and Web-based record pages, tracking every specific outbreak of animal or plant diseases at specific sites in one worldwide database in just seconds. The Internet and the unique Web-based Location Records are able to report and manage responses on animal and plant disease outbreaks around the world in just seconds.

Outbreaks, such as FMD (foot and mouth disease), BSE (“mad cow disease”), avian flu, screw worm fly, and many other animal and plant diseases – including the effects from all bacterial, fungal, viral, phytoplasmal, nematode, and parasitic infestations - are too expensive and burdensome on the world economy when sick animals or plants enter the global food chain. Recalls of suspected contaminated agricultural products are expensive not only for companies involved, but also for the whole international society.

ScoringAg.com and its traceback and traceup system for agriculture products, featuring Site-Specific Recordkeeping and PIDC location code, is one of the many divisions of ScoringSystem, Inc., which is located in Sarasota, Florida USA and specializes in providing solutions with mobile data, via wireless PDAs, laptops, and Semacode-programmed Nokia mobile phones. Whether using RFID or barcodes for tracking and traceback of livestock or perishable commodities and other consumer goods, www.ScoringAg.com makes managing data easier - and does it in an extremely cost effective manner.
 

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
Docket: 02N-0276 - Bioterrorism Preparedness; Registration of Food Facilities, Section 305
Comment Number: EC-254 [TSS SUBMISSION]

snip...

Greetings FDA and public, if you go to the below site, and search all BSE known countries and check out their air traffic illegal meat they have confiscated, and check out the low number checked, compared to actual passenger traffic, would not take too much for some nut to bring in FMD/TSEs into the USA as a 'suitcase bomb'. [[Under APHIS-PPQ's agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 284 air passengers from Israel were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2001. Seven of these passengers, or 2 percent, carried a total of 11 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the pathogen that causes BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the U.S.]] if they were to have questioned the terrorist that bombed the Twin Towers with jets, if they were to have questioned them at flight school in the USA, i am sure that they would have said they did not intend to visit the Twin Towers as a flying bomb either. what am i thinking, they probably did ask this? stupid me. [[In 1999 a small amount of non-species specific meat and offal was imported and a small amount of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was also imported. FBS is considered to have a relatively low risk of transmitting BSE.]] more of the USA infamous 'non-species coding system', wonder how many of these species are capable of carrying a TSE? snip... A total of 524,401 passengers arrived on direct flights to the U.S. from Israel in fiscal year 2000. This number does not include passengers who arrived in the U.S. from Israel via indirect flights. Under APHIS-PPQ's agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 284 air passengers from Israel were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2001. Seven of these passengers, or 2 percent, carried a total of 11 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the pathogen that causes BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the U.S. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_israel0602.htm Source: U.S. Department of Transportation and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base. What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Japan? Approximately 6.84 million passengers on 29,826 direct flights from Japan arrived at US airports in fiscal year 2000. An undetermined number of passengers from Japan arrived in the US via indirect flights. Under APHIS-PPQ's agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 801 air passengers from Japan were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. Of these 801 passengers, 10 carried meat (non-pork) items that could potentially harbor the pathogen(s) that cause BSE; most passengers carried an average of 1.7 kilograms of meat. None of these passengers from whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the US. Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_japan0901.htm What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from the affected country? A total of 3.3 million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from Germany in 1998, although many of these passengers would not have originated in Germany. As part of APHIS-PPQ's Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring, 8,247 air passengers from Germany were inspected for items of agricultural interest. Of these, 198, or 2.3%, were found to be carrying a total of 304 kg of items that could potentially present a risk for BSE. Thirty (30) of the passengers with items reported plans to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US. Reported destination states of these 30 passengers were CA, CO, DE, FL, LA, MT, OH, VA, and WY. Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_germany1200e.htm search archives at bottom of page of each BSE Country; http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/iw_archive.htm more on non-species coding system and TSEs and potential 'suitcase bombs'; To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Subject: Re: POLAND FINDS 4TH MAD COW CASE/USA IMPORTS FROM POLAND/non-species coding system strikes again References: <[email protected]> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit X-Virus-Scanner: Found to be clean Greetings again List Members, let me kick a madcow around here a bit. on the imports from Poland and the infamous USA 'non-species' coding system. the USDA/APHIS states;


> During the past four years (1998 - 2001), US imports from
> Poland included non-species specific animal products
> used in animal feeds and non-species specific sausage and offal
> products (Table 3). Given US restrictions on ruminant product
> imports, these US imports should not have contained ruminant
> material.


NOW, if you read Polands GBR risk assessment and opinion on BSE, especially _cross-contamination_, it states;

ANNEX 1 Poland - Summary of the GBR-Assessment, February 2001 EXTERNAL CHALLENGE STABILITY INTERACTION OF EXTERNAL CHALLENGE AND STABILITY The very high to extremely high external challenge met a very unstable system and could have led to contamination of domestic cattle in Poland from 1987 onwards. This internal challenge again met the still very unstable system and increased over time. The continuing very high external challenge supported this development. Not OK MBM-ban since 1997, but no feed controls. Reasonably OK Heat treatment equivalent to 133°C / 20min / 3 bar standards, but no evidence provided on compliance. Not OK. No SRM-ban, SRM are rendered and included in cattle feed. BSE surveillance: Not sufficient before 2001. Cross-contamination: Lines for ruminant and non-ruminant feed in feed-mills only separated in time and no analytical controls carried out. Likely present since 1987 and growing.

see full text and ANNEX 1 at;

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

so in my humble opinion, the statement by the USDA/APHIS that ''these US imports _should_ not have contained ruminant materials, is a joke. a sad joke indeed.

* POLAND BSE GBR RISK ASSESSMENT

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf



Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

CJD WATCH

http://www.fortunecity.com/healthclub/cpr/349/part1cjd.htm


CJD Watch/NEWS

http://disc.server.com/Indices/167318.html



full text;


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0276/02N-0276-EC-254.htm


TSS
 

Latest posts

Top