• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Cattle Bloat

Help Support Ranchers.net:

A

Anonymous

Guest
We have a calf on a two year old hfr. that was born around Apr. 1st, and is bloated up pretty big. He is one of our bigger calves, and I am wondering if anyone has any bloat cures that I am not aware of. He is just getting milk, pasture, min. and salt with good well water thrown in. I usually tube them to let the air out and give them some mineral oil.

I wonder what would cause bloat this time of the year on pasture, and if anyone has any good ideas. Thanks in advance.
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,225
Reaction score
445
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
Jake, definitely give him some probiotic. As I mentioned on another topic, bloat interferes with rumen function. The probiotic will help get that rumen going again. You might need to do it more than once.

Who knows why your calf is bloating? Just something not quite right in his system. Have you ever doctored this calf with antibiotic at any time?

We had a calf get pneumonia a couple of falls ago and we doctored him, then he bloated. We hosed him and used mineral oil. He bloated again so we repeated the treatment and added probiotic and he got okay. That fall cattle belonging to other ranchers bloated, including a bull of the neighbors. Without fail, those that gave the probiotic saved the ones they treated. Those that did not give the probiotic lost the cattle.

No one knows why everyone saw more of a bloating problem than usual that particular fall.

Do give probiotics a try with this calf!
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,225
Reaction score
445
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
Good question---and I don't have the answer. I don't know if the bacteria in a calf's gut is the same as in ours or not.

This is an interesting subject. Years and years ago when we milked a cow, the hospital called looking for some RAW BUTTERMILK. They had a patient that had had her leg amputated. With all the antibiotics they had given her, she had experienced diarrea for quite some time. They were looking for something to put the good bacteria back in her stomach. I did take them some and it did the trick, but it took a few days.

I doubt if any doctor/hospital would call for such a treatment these days!!!!
 

Maple Leaf Angus

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,823
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Ontario
I just remembered that from a few years ago when we used to raise veal. We had a vet who was just getting started in homeopathics and told us to feed the calves yogurt after we had used a heavy drug regimen in treating bacterial scours. Of course, the drugs are non-selective in what bacteria they kill, and the yogurt contained high levels of the necessary lactobacillicus (sp?) bacteria which would help to re-colonize the calf's gut.

Think about that if you like a little yogurt with your toast at breakfast! :shock: :)
 

Kate/wy

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 1, 2005
Messages
107
Reaction score
0
Location
ne/wy
one can buy capsules of acidolphus lactobacillius, or yougert starter at either Walmart, Kmart or a health food store. Yes even yougert works, and so does buttermilk. It has always amazed me how well those simple treatments overcome the effects of an antibiotic. Several treatments should get the gut working again. :lol: :lol: Used the capsules for years on myself before I got onto using it to restart a calfs gut!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks for the help. When I checked the calf this morning he was back to normal. I am going to keep an eye on him in case he is chronic.

Faster Horses could you tell me about probiotics? How do you administer it, and what form does it come in. I have never been around it. Vet or over the counter?
 

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
the real jake said:
Thanks for the help. When I checked the calf this morning he was back to normal. I am going to keep an eye on him in case he is chronic.

Faster Horses could you tell me about probiotics? How do you administer it, and what form does it come in. I have never been around it. Vet or over the counter?

say jake,faster horses always impresses me with her cow sense,and the fact that she gives this information freely,I think she is right on with her latest remedy,if you get a chance go to this web site and see if you can find probiotics,I use them and have had good luck[ www.valleyvet.com]..............good luck
 

DOC HARRIS

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
821
Reaction score
0
Location
Ft. Collins, CO
Faster horses said:
Good question---and I don't have the answer. I don't know if the bacteria in a calf's gut is the same as in ours or not.

This is an interesting subject. Years and years ago when we milked a cow, the hospital called looking for some RAW BUTTERMILK. They had a patient that had had her leg amputated. With all the antibiotics they had given her, she had experienced diarrea for quite some time. They were looking for something to put the good bacteria back in her stomach. I did take them some and it did the trick, but it took a few days.

I doubt if any doctor/hospital would call for such a treatment these days!!!!
What you are seeking is "Lactobacillus Acidophilus" which modifies Intestinal Bacteria and works to normalize the Intestinal Flora. Diarrea, of course, completely upsets the normal flora, and thereby the gut sort of becomes it's own worst enemy and continues the dissemination of Escherichia Coli (E. Coli), which is the bacteria NORMALLY present in the intestines of ALL vertebrates. If it is present in water, in over-abundant quantities, - - voilla! - - Diarrea! This is what "Montazuma's Revenge" is in Mexico! Also known as "The Scoots". :shock: Projecting that thought a little farther - perhaps that could be the etiology (causative factor) of the bloating problems. :???: Might carefully check the water sources for the cattle. And certainly the home drinking water, too! :shock:
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
29,225
Reaction score
445
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
jake, probiotics are good bacteria. When we doctor something with heavy antibiotics we can kill the good bacteria in the rumen. It takes good bacteria to maintain rumen function.

I have learned that rumen function in cattle is everything. We are not in the cattle feeding business, but the rumen feeding business. We would do well to always remember that one sentence. When we change feed quickly on cattle and see them become loose behind, that is a sign of an unhealthy rumen. (one instance). That is why a good mineral should contain yeast culture. That keeps the rumen microflora healthy and is an easy way to get the yeast culture in the cattle. Feeders receiving cattle are pretty adamant about having yeast culture in their receiving ration because of what it does for rumen function.

Some ranches give every calf probiotic at birth. I think that is an overkill, but certainly when you doctor something it doesn't hurt to follow it up with a probiotic. Fast Track is a good one, as far as I know.

Hope this helps.
 

DOC HARRIS

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
821
Reaction score
0
Location
Ft. Collins, CO
Faster horses said:
jake, probiotics are good bacteria. When we doctor something with heavy antibiotics we can kill the good bacteria in the rumen. It takes good bacteria to maintain rumen function.

I have learned that rumen function in cattle is everything. We are not in the cattle feeding business, but the rumen feeding business. We would do well to always remember that one sentence. When we change feed quickly on cattle and see them become loose behind, that is a sign of an unhealthy rumen. (one instance). That is why a good mineral should contain yeast culture. That keeps the rumen microflora healthy and is an easy way to get the yeast culture in the cattle. Feeders receiving cattle are pretty adamant about having yeast culture in their receiving ration because of what it does for rumen function.

Some ranches give every calf probiotic at birth. I think that is an overkill, but certainly when you doctor something it doesn't hurt to follow it up with a probiotic. Fast Track is a good one, as far as I know.

Hope this helps.
GOOD Post! Cause - Effect - Treatment - Prevention :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You guys have some interesting thoughts. Makes sense to me.

This calf has never had antibiotics. The reason I was asking about the probiotics was that I wasn't wanting to give him anything that wasn't drug free. We sold these calves as drug free, and I wanted to try something that woudn't keep him off the "sell" bunch. However, I will always doctor one to save it, as a live one always sells better than a dead one. :wink:

I know of a rancher in Wyo. that says if he sees a sick calf he gets out there and shoots it so the rest of them don't get it!

At these prices, I think I'd doctor it.

Also, this bloated calf was more than likely born on grass, as just a few were born inside. He should be pretty clean, but we all know 2 yr. old hfrs. don't give their calves all the immunity in the world, compared to a cow.
 

Kato

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
2,679
Reaction score
0
Location
Manitoba - At the end of the road
Lactobacillus Acidophilus can be bought at drug stores and health food stores. Everyone should take this stuff if they ever need antibiotics.

We've never tried it on a calf, but it sounds like a good idea. I know it sure works on people. You'd have to give him a lot of yogurt to get the same effect.

We have a product called Rumex here that helps a lot too. It's a bolus, and works very well.
 

Rowdy Ranch

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 22, 2005
Messages
273
Reaction score
0
Location
KS
The Real Jake- Had a calf this winter(a nov. born) that started bloating when he was 6 wks old and we'd debloat him,tube with mineral oil and give some vitamins with yeast that we got from vet. WEll calf was on 5 yr old cow and eating grond alf and prairie hay.water and mothers milk-he'd bloat every 3-4 wks so put him on wheat with cow and did the same bloatig within a month so after the 4th occassion of this we said that was the last time-well he started chewing his cud alot more and is today a 600 lb steer calf. So I guess don't give up! The Acidophilus might be a good idea as I read where (i think NE) there was some testing in feed lots.Hope something works for you.
 

EJ

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
211
Reaction score
0
Location
north central S Dak
Probiotics are great, but before I`d use the probiotics I`d put a twine bridle on the calf and then use the probiotics. For those of you that have never used a twine bridle it works fast and after a day or two the twine falls off.

Most times when an calf bloats they "lose their cud". Saliva produced dureing cud chewing is part of the digestive process for ruminants. I certainly admire and respect FH`s passion.
 

DOC HARRIS

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
821
Reaction score
0
Location
Ft. Collins, CO
Kato said:
Lactobacillus Acidophilus can be bought at drug stores and health food stores. Everyone should take this stuff if they ever need antibiotics.

We've never tried it on a calf, but it sounds like a good idea. I know it sure works on people. You'd have to give him a lot of yogurt to get the same effect.

We have a product called Rumex here that helps a lot too. It's a bolus, and works very well.
For a very extensive and VERY quick education on Lactobacillus Acidophilus - go to Google or Dogpile, et al, and just read the one-or two-line introductions of each section dealing with Lac. Bac. Ac. Probiotic IS Lac.Bac.Ac. - effectively. Lac.Bac.Ac. (my abreeveeashun to halp pervent me makin' a spelin' air!) should be in everyone's Emergency First Aid Kit to be used when you "Play Doctor!"
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
EJ said:
Probiotics are great, but before I`d use the probiotics I`d put a twine bridle on the calf and then use the probiotics. For those of you that have never used a twine bridle it works fast and after a day or two the twine falls off.

Most times when an calf bloats they "lose their cud". Saliva produced dureing cud chewing is part of the digestive process for ruminants. I certainly admire and respect FH`s passion.

I'd almost forgot about a twine bridle-- except I haven't had a problem with any for years either...
 

longjohn

Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Location
east colorado
I have discoverded there are other uses for lacto bacillus(sp)Years ago I had a hemroid problem and stopped at a small town drug store looking for the old supositories. The old drugist asked if I wanted to cure my problem or just treat the sysptoms. I said I'd sure cure it if I knew how.
He handed me some lacto bacullis which back then came as small white granuals and said to use this.
still thinking of supositories I ask how I was supposed to use that, and he said " just mix it whith a little milk" When he looked up and saw the completely blank look on my face he finally said (between fits of laughter) that it was to be taken orally.

It does work ,too
 

Radar

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
A couple of important points to remember in the use of DFM's/Probiotics is to follow the package's reccomendations for storage. Much like a MLV, many of these organisms are viable, but may not be shelf stable. The indications on the package may indicate a dose in volume or mass depending on the carrier (powder/tube), however if improperly stored the correct amount of colony forming units (CFU's) may not be administered.

Also, if money is going to be spent on using a "probiotic" it may be beneficial to look into the product further, much as one would vaccine/mineral selection. Many companies in todays market are studying and researching probiotics and the subsequent affects on livestock down to the gene level. This includes metabolic as well as immune function manipulation when a "specific" DFM is administered.

I use the term "specific" because when an product says Lactobacillus acidophilus it is in reference to the genus and species of particular bacteria. However that can be broken down futher into strain, and particular strains may be better at achieving the desired result when administered.
 

Latest posts

Top