• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

CDN Cattle Truckers in short supply

Help Support Ranchers.net:

SASH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
567
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Manitoba
Cdn. Trucks Short For US Cattle Demand




WINNIPEG, Jul 26, 2005 (Resource News International via COMTEX) -- The Canadian cattle industry may be unable to meet US demand for cattle since the reopening of the border last week due to a shortage of hauling firms, sources said.

According to Herb Lock, a cattle analyst with Farm Sense
Marketing, there is a noticeable shortage of livestock hauling
firms around.
"A lot of these people have found alternative jobs, some in the
oilpatch, where pay is leaps and bounds above what they can make
trucking," Lock said. "Why would these individuals want to leave,
unless they can be guaranteed steady work?"
Lock said that with an additional court action still pending, the
border could easily be closed to Canadian cattle again.
Prior to the border closure in 2003, 100 to 120 truckloads of
Manitoba cattle were crossing the US border each week, according
to Bob Dolyniuk, general manager of the Manitoba Trucking
Association.
"If all cattle available were to ship tomorrow, we wouldn't be
able to handle it," Dolyniuk said, "but if it ramps up slowly,
we'll be okay."
Since the border reopened, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
has issued 123 certificates to Canadian drivers clearing 7,597
cattle to export to the US.
However, Dolyniuk said the trucking industry has suffered from a
shortage of drivers for the past few years, particularly when it
comes to traveling to the US.
"Traditionally, the international market suffers most from a lack
of drivers," Dolyniuk said. "Drivers have to travel far from home
and they're away longer. There's also a lot of restrictions on
what (Canadian) drivers can do in the US."
Stan Eby, President of the Canadian Cattleman's Association, said
a lack of drivers is certainly a restriction, but it will take
time to know what effect it could have.
"This is still in it's infancy," Eby said. "It's still too early
to tell where we are in terms of demand."
He noted that while some cattle has been exported from Manitoba,
Alberta, and Ontario to the US since the ban was lifted, US
cattle was being processed in Ontario on Friday.
"Clearly trade is working both ways," he said.
Mike Jubinville of ProFarmer Canada said he doesn't expect to see
a lot of cattle being exported to the US because Canadian feeder
cattle prices compare favorably with prices in the US.
"There's no price incentive to ship to the US right now," he
said. He feels drivers won't put up with border hassles if there
is little spread between Canadian and US prices.
Costs may also keep the Canadian livestock industry from shipping
cattle to the US. Haney, president of the Canada Beef Export
Federation said fuel costs have risen sharply since 2003, making
it more expensive to haul cattle long distances.
 

STAFF

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
178
Reaction score
0
Location
Sarasota Florida
The new Bioterrorism FDA records for truckers in Dec. will put a big crimp in shipments coming across the border too.
 

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2005
Messages
367
Reaction score
0
Location
northeast nebraska
from what i'm hearing, not only will availability of trucks be a limiting factor in importing Canadian fats to the US, there's the simple fact that that there are not that many fat cattle available TO ship. and, there seems to be some issue with feeder cattle that will tie up those trucks that ARE available.

at any rate, the bottom line is, for you guys that are screaming "the sky is falling", even before all the BSE hysteria, there were not enough Canadian cattle imported into this country to make any kind of significant impact on the US market. this statement excludes "spot" markets and is based only on my own experience. i imagine agman would have the hard numbers over the past ten years.

regardless, it is what it is...at least in MY part of the country.
 

Les

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
784
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta
Cant US trucks come to canada and pick up cattle? must be lots of trucks down in the US.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Les said:
Cant US trucks come to canada and pick up cattle? must be lots of trucks down in the US.

Send up some of those Mexican trucks that gained access thru suing the US under NAFTA-- the ones the WTO people said we couldn't keep out because of little safety violations-- like no brakes, drivers that couldn't speak or read English (or traffic signs), bald tires, or not having any work log or moving vehicle violation records .... :wink: :? :???:
 

Big Muddy rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
22,169
Reaction score
398
Location
Big Muddy valley
Oldtimer said:
Les said:
Cant US trucks come to canada and pick up cattle? must be lots of trucks down in the US.

Send up some of those Mexican trucks that gained access thru suing the US under NAFTA-- the ones the WTO people said we couldn't keep out because of little safety violations-- like no brakes, drivers that couldn't speak or read English (or traffic signs), bald tires, or not having any work log or moving vehicle violation records .... :wink: :? :???:

They probably don't have any heater either. I think the poorest truck to ever come here with a load of anything was a truck load of pellets out of Minnesota.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
STAFF said:
The new Bioterrorism FDA records for truckers in Dec. will put a big crimp in shipments coming across the border too.

In my opinion it won't be enough to protect us from the upcoming big attack that will hit the US....But when it occurs you will see the borders slam shut like an iron curtain.....

The US Congress and administrative branch are not built to be proactive--it is controlled by the big money people until a disaster strikes-- which is proven by not being able to institute a mandatory COOL or mandatory ID law, or enforce the current border and immigration rules, and the infighting going on currently with the FDA, USDA, and even internally within the USDA over BSE firewalls-- but they are reactive, and after the next attack comes they will overreact- they will be forced to by the grassroots citizenry- especially if its shown that our lax border rules allowed it :cry: .....
 

Maple Leaf Angus

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,823
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Ontario
Oldtimer said:
STAFF said:
The new Bioterrorism FDA records for truckers in Dec. will put a big crimp in shipments coming across the border too.

In my opinion it won't be enough to protect us from the upcoming big attack that will hit the US....But when it occurs you will see the borders slam shut like an iron curtain.....

The US Congress and administrative branch are not built to be proactive--it is controlled by the big money people until a disaster strikes-- which is proven by not being able to institute a mandatory COOL or mandatory ID law, or enforce the current border and immigration rules, and the infighting going on currently with the FDA, USDA, and even internally within the USDA over BSE firewalls-- but they are reactive, and after the next attack comes they will overreact- they will be forced to by the grassroots citizenry- especially if its shown that our lax border rules allowed it :cry: .....

Oldtimer, it sounds like you are gleefully rubbing your hands together in anticipation. Feeling the need for another disaster there, sherriff?
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
Oldtimer said:
STAFF said:
The new Bioterrorism FDA records for truckers in Dec. will put a big crimp in shipments coming across the border too.

In my opinion it won't be enough to protect us from the upcoming big attack that will hit the US....But when it occurs you will see the borders slam shut like an iron curtain.....

The US Congress and administrative branch are not built to be proactive--it is controlled by the big money people until a disaster strikes-- which is proven by not being able to institute a mandatory COOL or mandatory ID law, or enforce the current border and immigration rules, and the infighting going on currently with the FDA, USDA, and even internally within the USDA over BSE firewalls-- but they are reactive, and after the next attack comes they will overreact- they will be forced to by the grassroots citizenry- especially if its shown that our lax border rules allowed it :cry: .....

What a laugh :roll: Just who got M"ID" taken out of M"COOL"? It wasn't big money that did that unless you are talking about the big money behind R-CALF. Maybe if a few grassroot citizenry could see pass the word import and looked at the future of the cattle industry, they would see that a few proactive moves would have protected the Beef industry. If R-CALF would have allowed the burden of M"ID" you wouldn't now be scambling to get a reactive program in place that is going to cost you BIG MONEY because the government is involved. IF they would have allowed the USDA to follow the OIE's recommendations after the Washington cow was found, and get import/export policies in place that didn't punish a country that is minimal risk, the US wouldn't be being punished for their BSE. But no, they had to protect current high cattle prices at all cost even if it meant destroying the future of the US cattle industry. The US consumers may not have been listening to R-CALF rhetoric but others were like JAPAN and now the US has to convince them that your beef is safe because of the precautionary measures that have been taken. R-CALF and their grassroot citizenry lives for the moment and to hell with the consequences to the future. If R-CALF lived proactively they would have backed M"ID" so you could trace US cattle. They would have realized that if Canada had BSE it was highly likely the US had it. They would have done everything they could to reassure consumers that beef is safe if precautionary measures are taken. But no, by getting M"ID" taken out of M"COOL" they left the USDA no way of tracing all US cattle back to birth place. They denied BSE was in the US and lied repeatedly about the safety of Canadian beef so consumer would believe that all beef coming from a country with BSE is unsafe and now the US falls into that same catagory. R-CALF leadership even said they would not eat or feed Canadian beef to their families as it wasn't safe how does that comment assure US consumers that US beef is safe now. Way to act proactively Oldtimer. Just what other proactive measures does R-CALF have in store for the US beef industry. Appeals all the way to the Supreme Court to prove Beef from a country with BSE is a GENUINE RISK OF DEATH? :roll: Or will there be a reactive flip flop done by R-CALF. :?
 

alabama

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
0
Location
Alabama
Oldtimer said:
STAFF said:
The new Bioterrorism FDA records for truckers in Dec. will put a big crimp in shipments coming across the border too.

In my opinion it won't be enough to protect us from the upcoming big attack that will hit the US....But when it occurs you will see the borders slam shut like an iron curtain.....

The US Congress and administrative branch are not built to be proactive--it is controlled by the big money people until a disaster strikes-- which is proven by not being able to institute a mandatory COOL or mandatory ID law, or enforce the current border and immigration rules, and the infighting going on currently with the FDA, USDA, and even internally within the USDA over BSE firewalls-- but they are reactive, and after the next attack comes they will overreact- they will be forced to by the grassroots citizenry- especially if its shown that our lax border rules allowed it :cry: .....

OT I think you are right on target.
 

Latest posts

Top