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CULL COWS

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HAY MAKER

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I have a few old cows in their teens, I must be getting old because I hate to haul the old girls to town.My numbers are way down,I got pasture for them,I believe Ill just leave them in the river pasture and let them be.Im not saying if things change I wont change my mind ,but these old girls have paid there way, and IM not sure a few hundred bucks a piece is worth hauling them in?..................good luck
 

Broke Cowboy

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Well if you are that soft hearted, you might toss them to some high school kid or young couple looking to raise a few for their own use. Been known to do that myself once in a while.

They generally will come and fetch them home saving me the cost of hauling.

B.C.
 

HAY MAKER

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HAY MAKER said:
I have a few old cows in their teens, I must be getting old because I hate to haul the old girls to town.My numbers are way down,I got pasture for them,I believe Ill just leave them in the river pasture and let them be.Im not saying if things change I wont change my mind ,but these old girls have paid there way, and IM not sure a few hundred bucks a piece is worth hauling them in?..................good luck
 

alabama

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If those girles are not costing you anything and you got plenty of grass and extra hay for the winter why not let them give you another calf.
The calf will most likley bring you as much as the cull cow. You can always sell her next year if she don't die on you.
 

HAY MAKER

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Alabama said:
If those girles are not costing you anything and you got plenty of grass and extra hay for the winter why not let them give you another calf.
The calf will most likley bring you as much as the cull cow. You can always sell her next year if she don't die on you.

That's kinda what I did last year Alabama,but no hurry they aint going anywhere and they got grass so I got time................good luck
 

George

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Hay Maker you sound like me about 10 years ago when the kids lost interest in the horses - - - - I gave 11 registered colts to the local 4H horse and pony club and sold the young mares but kept 3 old mares and the old stud - - - can't really say why I kept them but the mares have all died of old age and the stud (1970 model) has lost his left eye but still seems to enjoy life. Upon occasion he will keep a complacent calf away from the herd - - - he is no longer quick enough to pull this on a determined calf. But we had great times on the local cutting circuit for several years and I can't see him being mistreated on the way to slaughter. If he seems to not enjoy life I will take him out back and fire up the backhoe and put him down. One of my neighbors had several angus cows that were older than the hills - - -he would put each in a stall over night with a good brushing. When his wife died he wanted to move to town and had me come over and put them down. We butchered them on the farm and he gave the meat to all who wanted it - - - whole cow steak burgers. He did not mind that they were meat he just did not want them going through the strangeness of the packing house. It was less than 6 months after this that I feel he died of a broken heart and while I feel the loss of his wife was most on his mind I also feel the loss of the cows was the finishing straw.
 

elwapo

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We are now able to get $225 to test the old girls for BSE here in Alberta. It is not a bad thing in that they can be shot eating grass in the pasture instead of the stress of a trip to the slaughter house. The vet comes out to the ranch and we scoop out the brains. Last winter shot coyotes off the carcasses.
 

nr

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HAY MAKER said:
HAY MAKER said:
I have a few old cows in their teens, I must be getting old because I hate to haul the old girls to town.My numbers are way down,I got pasture for them,I believe Ill just leave them in the river pasture and let them be.Im not saying if things change I wont change my mind ,but these old girls have paid there way, and IM not sure a few hundred bucks a piece is worth hauling them in?..................good luck

When I get old I hope my husband treats me as well as you're treating your cows!
 

Jessie

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Haymaker...... Oh my god you big softie.
My husband feels the same way with some of the older ladies in his herd.
 

baling wire

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I sold a cow last spring that weaned 16 calves and she brought 40 dollars more than I paid for her as a heifer. But sometimes I keep them 1 year to many.
 

Faster horses

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Hey Haymaker and George:

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

You're my kind of people!


While I realize we can't do this with every animal, there are those who are favorites and that makes us feel better when we can keep them till the end. And 'the end' in my book doesn't mean until they starve to death. That's criminal. But we can do for our animals some things we can't do for our people~and that is put them out of their misery when they don't enjoy life any longer.
 

Kato

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Way back in 81 we bought our first Charolais cows. There was one in that group, old #159, who produced one top heifer after another, every one of them making a top cow herself. After a few years, a large part of our herd could be traced back to her.

Well, she finally got old, and had what we figured would be her last calf. She was getting a little thin, and not looking like she was going to go into winter in good shape. We really hated the thought of sending her down the road, but we were also young, poor, and deep in debt, and really couldn't afford to keep pet cows. We could see the decision we would have to make in the fall, and were dreading it. We had become very attached to the old girl.

One day we got a call from a neighbour that he could see a dead cow in the pasture. We went out to check, and be darned if it wasn't old 159, and she had been struck by lightning! She was also insured. A double blessing. Sometimes it's funny how things work out. The decision was taken right out of our hands, and that's fine by us.
 

George

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When you leave the decisions to God he will always do what is right. :D But then sometimes it takes a while before you realise how good he can be. :???:
Many people tell me that God won't close a door without opening a window but I feel they have it backwards - - -he won't close a window without providing a door. We have to have the faith and determination to open and follow thru. :eek:
God knew that cow had made a geat contribuation to your family and if you had not held her in high reguard she would have gone to slaughter and brought next to nothing but he provided a better outcome :!:
I wear a WWJD bracelet 24 / 7 and while it is not always on my mind I see it often enough that it really has an impact on my everyday life. :D :D :D
 

katrina

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WE have cows that will never leave the place. They were born here and will die here. Last one to die here was a rednecked cow that would come to the calving barn before she calved. Would calve in the nice warm clean barn, I would feed her some gain and the next morning she would be at the gate with her calf ready to go out to the pasture. You can't sell them kind. And we won't even get started with my old horse.
 

Buckerette

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I raise bucking bulls and have (had) 2 special bulls, Catfish & Baby. I promised them that because they did right by me, I'll do right by them. Baby died last year. Broke my heart. Buried him in the pasture. Here is the weird thing, as we were dumping the last bit of dirt over him all the cows and Catfish (who was on cows at that time) came running over, stopped in a straight line and bellerred (sp). It was like they were paying there respects, gave me the chills.
 

DOC HARRIS

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HAY MAKER said:
I have a few old cows in their teens, I must be getting old because I hate to haul the old girls to town.My numbers are way down,I got pasture for them,I believe Ill just leave them in the river pasture and let them be.Im not saying if things change I wont change my mind ,but these old girls have paid there way, and IM not sure a few hundred bucks a piece is worth hauling them in?..................good luck
HAY MAKER

Are they still producing a healthy calf every year? Can they eat and drink COLD water without it being heated? In other words - are they paying their way and then some? GO with it! :)
 

DOC HARRIS

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Buckerette said:
I raise bucking bulls and have (had) 2 special bulls, Catfish & Baby. I promised them that because they did right by me, I'll do right by them. Baby died last year. Broke my heart. Buried him in the pasture. Here is the weird thing, as we were dumping the last bit of dirt over him all the cows and Catfish (who was on cows at that time) came running over, stopped in a straight line and bellerred (sp). It was like they were paying there respects, gave me the chills.
Buckerette -

Some people who know me think that I am a tough, cantankerous curmudgeon -(probably my three sons :shock: ). Your story didn't just give me the chills - it gave me the "tears". :( I have had experiences similar to that twice in the past. It is an eerie feeling!
 

Buckerette

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Glad I'm not the only one that has experienced that. I really thought I was going crazy or taking it for more then it was. I think animals understand a lot more then people give them credit for.
 

DOC HARRIS

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Buckerette said:
Glad I'm not the only one that has experienced that. I really thought I was going crazy or taking it for more then it was. I think animals understand a lot more then people give them credit for.
Buckerette - I would like to modify your last statement a little: I think that SOME animals understand a lot more than SOME people! DOC HARRIS - - - P.S. - - -and I still have some tears from reading your story again!
 

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