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Gert cows

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TWOROPES

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My grandad passed on about 50 shelton-king ranch blooded gert cows to me and my dad, who run commercial cows, damn good mamas. I am surprised to find they could survive canadian winters.
 

TK Ranch

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I would have to agree with the last statement of thriving in the winters. from summers of 40 degrees to winters of minus 40 degrees plus windchill they are one hardy breed of cattle. And they calve out easy too.
 

sw

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I have to ask though, what is the disposition of them? I was around some in Idaho as a kid and they were terrible. I am friends with some of the guys who used to work the Flying D (Sheltons which is now Ted Turners out of Bozeman) and they had to "cowboy up on alot of them", AIing them while being roped head and heeled because you could not get them into the corrals let alone an AI box. What is the purpose of putting up with that stuff? Bobby Shelton did not have to do the work, why would anybody want that when you can find things that do work. Just like using EXT, why put yourself through the misery. BTW, these same guys I know that were at the Flying D before Teddy and Jane, also roped cow elk and cut their ears off as a trophy, they are hands. :wink:
 

TK Ranch

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As for the disposition of Gerts I have no problems we AI them and work with them on a regular basis.As long as you stay calm and quiet around when handling them they are fine, but as soon as you get a little riled up or pissed off because things are not working the way you want they will get spooked. Just like any breed keep your voice down and don't beet them with a cane to get them moving and all goes well.
 

the_jersey_lilly_2000

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We have a few bramers, that we bought in with a bunch of cows last year. Theres maybe 4 or 5 strait bramers, and they are the calmest thangs in the lot when we work. I was really worried at first, but was a pleasant surprise. Most bramers I've seen worked are high headed, blowin, tryin to jump the fence, had really turned me against them, but these have changed my mind.
 

TK Ranch

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Gerts are some of the nicest cattle to work with. wether it's the 3/8 bramha in them or not but man are they good mama's. calved out some PB hiefers this year and you can't telll the difference between there calves and that of my cows.
 

Bward

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They have excellent and long memories. If treated right at a young age they grow up respectful and good natured for a lifetime. They are not as forgiving as a Herford. You screw up and they will remember it forever.

I once took three heifers to a heifer show in Red Deer Alberta. These had been in the feedlot and had not been handled. Once at the show I made my way into the pen and started brushing them. In less than three days I had won them over... I couldn't beleive it. I still have two of those cows and they are now 9 years old. I can't walk out into the pasture without them pestering me for a scratch.

I now have a dozen girls who ask for scratching all learned from them watching the others.

So yes it does depend on early handling. And while the cows are bugging me and clinging, their calves are taking it all in and getting closer and closer, reducing their flight zone. It all adds up in the disposition of the herd.
 

DOC HARRIS

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Faster horses said:
Roped cow elk and cut off their ears?

I can see that they might enjoy the challenge of roping an elk, but why did they have to inflict pain for no reason?

That isn't my idea of a good hand.
NOW - if we were roping Teddy :twisted: and Jane :twisted: :twisted: I could easily understand the 'CUT' routine - maybe even 'PASTE' thrown in for good measure! But - - the ears? :???: - - yeah, on second thought - why not? The ears, too! Might get their attention - BIG TIME! :roll:

DOC HARRIS
 

DOC HARRIS

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Bward said:
They have excellent and long memories. If treated right at a young age they grow up respectful and good natured for a lifetime. They are not as forgiving as a Herford. You screw up and they will remember it forever.

I once took three heifers to a heifer show in Red Deer Alberta. These had been in the feedlot and had not been handled. Once at the show I made my way into the pen and started brushing them. In less than three days I had won them over... I couldn't beleive it. I still have two of those cows and they are now 9 years old. I can't walk out into the pasture without them pestering me for a scratch.

I now have a dozen girls who ask for scratching all learned from them watching the others.

So yes it does depend on early handling. And while the cows are bugging me and clinging, their calves are taking it all in and getting closer and closer, reducing their flight zone. It all adds up in the disposition of the herd.
Bward - Your post here is another example of what I regard as good Herd Management! Good land, Good Cattle and Good Herd Management - a winning combination for success in your BUSINESS!

DOC HARRIS
 

TWOROPES

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I grew up working gert cows in south Texas, My Grandaddy ran them and I went on to work for Bass Brothers when they ran a big Gert herd, now me and dad have some. They are the best Momma cows I have ever seen, and if selected properly require no calving assistance even first calf hiefers. They will protect thier calves, some peaple see this as bad temperment, I see it as an asset. Work them early in the morning before it gets hot or late in the evening, work your bulls first, nice and slow and steady, then strip your calves off and work your cows and calves seperatley, then turn your calves too light to ship into your momma cow pen and they will mother up on thier own if you let them settle a while. These cattle will teach you to work slow and steady, and work well until you abuse or start rushing them in the heat. They are good for training young cowboys who want to get more punchy than necessary. Just my opinion.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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When starting my cow herds I bought a older Gert bull that a old fellow brought up from the king ranch. The bull was about 7 or 8 so I turned him with the cows a week before I turned out the angus bulls just to give him a chance. well I ended up with about 60 out of 100 gert calves but had to move the cows away from the bull as he was so foot sore and tired that he just wanted to be left alone. I also tried brangus bulls. Used them 1 year and sold them to a rodeo contractor. They found a good home. :cowboy:
 

TK Ranch

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I have to agree with Two Ropes on his statement about gert cows. Treat them well and they will treat you well,a little bit of respect goes along way when dealing with cattle( people too) As for B.Ward we have two of thier bulls and man are they easy to handle. Oh and they like a good rub now and then.
 

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