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Tam

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I need your help. I want to know if you were judging an auctioneering competition what would you be looking at in the auctioneers abilities? Thank you in advance. :)
 

Denny

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knowledge of the item selling if they are cattle can he tell a good from a bad.Can you understand him? We have a guy here sounds like his mouth is full of ~sh~ he sucks does the auctioneer have a zest for his job or does he make you yawn.....
 

Tam

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Thanks Denny
So far I have Clarity, Knowledge of item, ability to hold your attention,
should I put ability to work the audience and catch bids.

Come on you guys and gals I was asked to come up with a list of things to put on a auctioneering score sheet and I need some help. I never figured I would have to ask twice for some of you guys opinions on anything. :wink:
 
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Tam- A couple I can think of is appearance-- do they fit the look of what they are selling-- which leads to #2 can they build a rapport with the audience...Some auctioneers can almost en-trance an audience and with a smile here and a wink there sell a $5 slopbucket for double the price.....

The other thing I can think of is how many "fillers" do they use-- good auctioneers use few...By fillers I mean words like give me, gotta have, whatta you gonna bid, mumbling words and sounds that no one understands, etc. etc... A good auctioneer will just call bids using a few fillers like "now".
 

TimH

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A good auctioneer also needs to be able to keep straight who is "in" and who is "out" while taking multiple bids.
I have seen inexperienced auction-goers actually bid against themselves partly because of the auctioneer's inexperience........or was it??????? :lol:

Being easily understood is probably THE most important thing. Beyond that I always enjoy an auctioneer that has a good sense of humor and develops a rapport with the crowd. A smiling face is also a must-have. Like any other "entertainer" he must make the crowd believe that there is nowhere else he'd rather be. (I should have maybe used the "politicly correct" he/she, but I have never seen a female auctioneer) I'm sure there must be a few around somewhere,though????
 

Tam

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Thanks guys I let you know how the auction goes.
 
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TimH said:
(I should have maybe used the "politicly correct" he/she, but I have never seen a female auctioneer) I'm sure there must be a few around somewhere,though????

Used to be a lady auctioneer down in Billings that had a consignment auction barn with her dad-- She was fairly well endowed and knew it...She was one of those auctioneers that talk a lot--Her favorite sayings were "whatch gonna give me for it" and "what are they worth"--Being that most mens minds are always on the same subject at least 10,000 times a day, she could always get a chuckle and grin or two-- but with a wink here and there and the right smile at some one, I watched her sell old used beat up items to guys for double the price it would cost new...
 

Shelly

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TimH said:
A good auctioneer also needs to be able to keep straight who is "in" and who is "out" while taking multiple bids.
I have seen inexperienced auction-goers actually bid against themselves partly because of the auctioneer's inexperience........or was it??????? :lol:

Being easily understood is probably THE most important thing. Beyond that I always enjoy an auctioneer that has a good sense of humor and develops a rapport with the crowd. A smiling face is also a must-have. Like any other "entertainer" he must make the crowd believe that there is nowhere else he'd rather be. (I should have maybe used the "politicly correct" he/she, but I have never seen a female auctioneer) I'm sure there must be a few around somewhere,though????

My husband's cousin wife was an auctioneer, don't know if she still is or not. Kind of lost touch with them. She used to work at Heartland Livestock in North Battleford and then moved on to Regina.
 

cowsense

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Tam.....so far I add up presentation and crowd rapport, proper appearance ,experience and knowledge of auction items; proper cadence and clarity of chant. A good auctioneer must also be able to respond to any situation and keep the crowd in hand. For a surprise you might auction off the right to clip BMr's mustache or possibly even the chance to own Haymaker's trade :twisted: :wink: :wink: :wink:
 

Tam

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Thought we would throw in one hard to auction item and see how they handle it. But as far as BMr's mustache you will have to ask him about that. :wink: :shock: :? :help: :lol2:
 

Soapweed

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Some of the "best" auctioneers are sometimes a little too good for their own good. They "take" bids that aren't even there. I like a good entertaining auctioneer as good as the next person, but it always kinda gripes me when I have to bid against a rafter to get what I'm trying to buy. To me, honesty and integrity from the auctioneer's block is just as important in that line of work as it is in any other.

From a buyer's point of view, the only bid that matters is the last bid. I usually wait until most of the dust has settled before entering the fray. If at the last qualified bid, I am still interested, that is where I throw my hand into the air. Sometimes that is the only bid required.

Participating in an auction, or just watching one, is an educational experience. It is like a good game of poker, and the players that don't display emotion are more likely to come out the winner. Many times the auctioneer can sense the lust and desperation of a prospective buyer. Those buyers are much more apt to pay "too much" to get what they want. The ringmen are often as conniving and unscrupulous as the auctioneer, and they can make a lot of racket and hoopla to cover their tracks. There is a mob frenzy that can develop.

A bidder is smart to bid a few times on stuff they don't want, so the auctioneer and ringmen can see that they know how to say "NO". Then when a bull or horse comes into the ring that the bidder really wants, the powers that be are less apt to take that person for a ride.

Bidding at an auction can be somewhat of an adrenalin rush. Like any other fun activity, remorse can be a secondary effect. It's pretty easy to buy a "number ten" and wake up the next morning owning a number three or four. This is the voice of experience talking. :? :) :shock: :wink:
 

Northern Rancher

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A good auctioneer will make you wantto give you his money and make you feel good for doing it. Lynn Weishar at Reva, S.D. is a very good one and even the right dishonourable Patrick Goggins could work a crowd-I'll never forget him selling a black bull at the Midland test-he'd hurt himself and kind of hobbled around the ring-Pat said a NBA star had just come off the same injury and scored 30 points-then he added 'AND HE'S THE SAME COLOR AS THIS BULL'. I don't think anybody gets away with more political incorrectness from the block than Sask's own Roy Rutledge-he sure don't let facts ruin a good anecdote. As far as judging Tam-I'd go with your gut feeling-which of the guys would you want crying the sale when your calves hit the ring.
 

Tam

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Well the Auction is all done and over and everything worked out well. I got a call at 2:30 in the afternoon that one of the auctioneers wasn't going to beable to compete so after a bit of a panic attack I called the MC for the evening as he was a auctioneer himself and asked him if he would compete instead of MC'ing. After a bit if talking he agreed which then left me without an MC which was a little eazier to solve and the night was back to full slate of auctioneers and MC and all the judges did show up to do there jobs. It turned out that the once MC turn competor that thought he was past his prime and really only did it as I was in a jam won the competition and left with a fancy belt buckle. I was told by the judges that the score sheet I came up with thanks to your help made their job a bit eazier so thanks to all who had suggestions. The one trick auction item turned out to be three sets of Ford Canvas lawn chairs. Each auctioneer had to auction off a set and see who could get the best price. we had already silent auctioned off 3 sets for $10 a set so I really didn't figure they would do that great but One got $70 one got $65 and the last got $45 All in all the night was alot of fun Thanks again for the suggestions. :D
 

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