• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Horse slaughter will continue, officials declare - U.S.

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,257
Reaction score
42
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
Horse slaughter will continue, officials declare
New inspection fee system allows meat sales despite congressional action
Updated: 1:24 p.m. ET Feb. 7, 2006
WASHINGTON - Horse slaughter for meat will continue in the United States, despite votes in Congress to halt the practice, the Agriculture Department announced Tuesday.

American horse meat is sold mostly for human consumption in Europe and Asia, although some goes to U.S. zoos.

Congress didn’t ban horse slaughter outright. Instead, lawmakers used a tactic that is common in spending legislation. Horses must pass inspection by department veterinarians before they are slaughtered, so lawmakers voted to yank the salaries and expenses of those inspectors.

Department officials maintain the law requires inspections regardless. They announced Tuesday they will pay for live horse inspections by charging fees to slaughter plants.

Rep. John Sweeney, R-N.Y., denounced the decision, saying that “commerce and greed have ruled the day.”

“To end this practice, Congress, with widespread public support, passed this amendment by a landslide vote in both the House and the Senate,” said Sweeney, who serves on the House Appropriations Committee. “This action is a direct defiance of congressional intent.”

The department acted on requests from slaughter plants, two in Texas and one in Illinois, which said their communities could be facing $41 million in losses.

Compared to the huge beef, pork and poultry industries, horse meat is a tiny business: Plants slaughtered about 88,000 horses, mules and other equines in 2005, according to the department.

In letters to Sweeney and other lawmakers last month, department lawyer James Michael Kelly pointed out Congress did not address other elements of the inspection system.

After live animals are examined and slaughtered, the Federal Meat Inspection Act requires separate inspections of carcasses and of meat. Lawmakers did not prohibit those inspections, Kelly said. He added that a separate law allows fee-for-service inspections for more exotic animals, such as bison, deer, elk or rabbits.

The new fee system will go into effect on March 10, the department’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said Tuesday. The agency will accept public comments on the system through March 9.
 

Big Muddy rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
22,035
Reaction score
253
Location
Big Muddy valley
Don't remember all the details but they were getting money for a dog rescue and someone was killing the dogs and throwing the in a dumpster or something. They got caught but haven't heard much more about it.
 

Mike

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
28,480
Reaction score
0
Location
Montgomery, Al
Big Muddy rancher said:
Don't remember all the details but they were getting money for a dog rescue and someone was killing the dogs and throwing the in a dumpster or something. They got caught but haven't heard much more about it.

I'm pretty sure the two guys that got caught went to jail.
 

Manitoba_Rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
2,117
Reaction score
0
Location
Canada
We were at a horse sale last weekend and the buyer there said slaughter horses were running in the .45-.54 cent range delivered to plant. This is higher than cull cows up here right now. Decent open Percheron/Belgen mare weighing in around 1700 lbs were bringing $600-$$700. Pretty darn good!! I was sitting in the stands bidding the buyer up so he had to pay the price.
 

righter

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 6, 2005
Messages
54
Reaction score
0
Location
Wherever I go, there I am
There's a bunch of people out there that think all horses are Trigger, who have never met the ones that need a trigger (pulled) Glad to say that there are some public servants (Nelson of Nebraska for one) that have their heads screwed on straight.
When this funding shutdown was proposed, I dug into it pretty heavy, and no one anywhere had any idea what would become of the animals that didn't go to slaughter. Just left to die, I guess. Although one good idea was to turn them out in the subdivision where the author of the proposal lives!!!
And who are we (Americans, or PETA) to say that human consumption of anything is wrong? Wonder what that fine organization would say if someone called them racist or ethnicists? Isn't that what condeming a culture because of its beliefs or practices would be called?
 

theHiredMansWife

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
1,191
Reaction score
0
Location
southwest corner of the Sandhills
righter said:
And who are we (Americans, or PETA) to say that human consumption of anything is wrong? Wonder what that fine organization would say if someone called them racist or ethnicists? Isn't that what condeming a culture because of its beliefs or practices would be called?

I have the same philosophy. I don't have any great desire to eat horse, but then I won't eat calf fries, either. :wink:
But critters is critters and they're all made of meat... Why is a horse somehow more sacred than a cow?
 

Faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
28,971
Reaction score
274
Location
NE WY at the foot of the Big Horn mountains
I think it is because they sweat through their hide and because they did so much to help the country get settled. It is just something Americans, as a whole, just don't do.

Hungry as my dad was in France during WWII, they served him horsemeat and he would not eat it.
 

OldDog/NewTricks

Well-known member
Joined
May 24, 2005
Messages
3,443
Reaction score
0
Location
The Dam End of Silicon Valley
PETA Kills Puppies and Kittens
June 21, 2005 - In a development stunning even to those who actively follow the outrageous exploits of animal rights extremists, two full-time staff members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), based in Norfolk, Virginia, have been charged with 31 felony counts of animal cruelty after allegedly killing and disposing of 31 dead animals in a grocery store dumpster late last week. The Animal Agriculture Alliance (Alliance) today called for a federal investigation into these actions and greater scrutiny of potentially-related actions.

Authorities in Ahoskie, North Carolina have publicly charged the PETA employees, Andrew Benjamin Cook and Adria Joy Hinkle, with 31 felony counts of animal cruelty after the duo allegedly dumped 7 puppies and 11 other pets in a grocery store dumpster. When the authorities searched their van, registered to PETA, the authorities found another 13 dead pets, including two kittens which a local veterinarian is quoted as being ''very adoptable.'' We understand that only hours earlier, Cook and Hinkle picked up the animals from the local shelter, identifying themselves as PETA employees, claming they would find the animals ''good homes.''

This incident may be part of a pattern. According to news reports, the grocery store manager in indicated that the duo had illicitly used his dumpster as an impromptu pet cemetery nine times. Other similar reports come from Greenville, North Carolina where authorities discovered more than 70 dead animals last month which they believe to be connected to PETA. Likewise, this spring, authorities found over 150 dead dogs dumped in trash bags near a riverbank in Scott County, Virginia.

For years PETA has portrayed itself as a champion of animal rights, attacking American farmers and ranchers who care for their animals. The Alliance submits PETA's ''champion'' status would be highly misleading if the organization is actively involved in the destruction of highly adoptable puppies and kittens.

Based on these incidents, the Alliance recommends that the authorities re-examine PETA for defrauding its donors. In a recent fundraising letter, PETA claims ''every dollar you send is put to work instantly sponsoring crucial legal cases, public education, and veterinary care.'' The Alliance believes that killing puppies and kittens, then discarding them in dumpsters would not meet anyone's standards of veterinary care.

The Animal Agriculture Alliance (Alliance) finds this pattern of deception, collection and systematic slaughter both highly alarming and sickening. A complete investigation, including whether anyone else at PETA is culpable, should be immediately initiated.

The Animal Agriculture Alliance is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. The Alliance's mission is to communicate the important role of animal agriculture to our nation's economy, productivity, vitality, security and that animal well-being is central to producing safe, high-quality, affordable food and other products essential to our daily lives. Learn more about the Alliance by visiting its website at www.animalagalliance.org or by calling Kay Johnson, Executive Vice-President, at (703) 562-5160.

Copyright © 2006 Animal Agriculture Alliance. All rights reserved.
 

CattleRMe

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 1, 2006
Messages
878
Reaction score
0
Location
Nebraska
Before the closure of the horse kill plant in North Platte Nebraska my father made part of his agriculture income from buying and selling killer horses. It generated income and as we all know being diversified is what helps ranches run. Plus there are horses that get to old, crippled, or even the ones that just are always to wild or unbreakable and something needs to be done with them. Not sure i'd eat horse but as for the calf fries yes those i do!
 

righter

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 6, 2005
Messages
54
Reaction score
0
Location
Wherever I go, there I am
I know that during WWII my grandmother (in america) ate horsemeat and was glad to get it.
And my stepdad knew a lot of good cowboys in the bad old days, who when they couldn't get work, would gather up wild horses to sell to slaughter. When that was stopped, they just sort of faded away. So now the horses are stockpiled in warehouse lots and the cowboys are extinct.
It seems that more and more there are those who would put animals (and I love animals, especially horses) above people and their needs. I know the two can coexist, but I think the Good Book reads 'And God gave man dominion over the animals'
 

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,257
Reaction score
42
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
righter said:
It seems that more and more there are those who would put animals (and I love animals, especially horses) above people and their needs. I know the two can coexist, but I think the Good Book reads 'And God gave man dominion over the animals'

Some animal-rights advocates think that our furry friends are just as good as people, and should even be allowed to vote. As far as I'm concerned, if animals cannot read, write and understand the English language they shouldn't be allowed to vote in the United States. And that goes for two-legged animals, also.
 

Jinglebob

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
5,962
Reaction score
0
Location
Western South Dakota
righter said:
So now the horses are stockpiled in warehouse lots and the cowboys are extinct.

Sure wish you folks would calling us extinct. We ain't extinct, you just can't see us from the road, as Bax say's! :wink:
 

Latest posts

Top