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Inspector General-USDA Law Enforcement too!

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Mike

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OIG Investigative and Law Enforcement Authority

The Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), was administratively established by the Secretary of Agriculture in 1962 following a major criminal fraud scandal affecting several agencies within USDA. OIG was later legislatively established by Congress under the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law [P.L.] 95-452), as amended.

Pursuant to the Inspector General Act of 1978 and Section 1337 of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (P.L. 97-98), OIG Investigations is the law enforcement arm of the Department, with Department-wide investigative jurisdiction. OIG Special Agents conduct investigations of significant criminal activities involving USDA programs, operations, and personnel, and are authorized to make arrests, execute warrants, and carry firearms. The types of investigations conducted by OIG Special Agents involve criminal activities such as frauds in subsidy, price support, benefits, and insurance programs; significant thefts of Government property or funds; bribery; extortion; smuggling; and assaults on employees. Investigations involving criminal activity that affects the health and safety of the public, such as meat packers who knowingly sell hazardous food products and individuals who tamper with food regulated by USDA, are also high-profile investigative priorities. In addition, OIG Special Agents are poised to provide emergency law enforcement response to USDA declared emergencies and suspected incidents of terrorism affecting USDA regulated industries, as well as USDA programs, operations, personnel, and installations, in coordination with Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies, as appropriate. Finally, OIG Special Agents provide physical protection for the Secretary of Agriculture and respond to any threat, intimidation, or assault against the Secretary that occurs in his/her official capacity.

The enactment of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-37) authorized OIG to receive funds and property through criminal and civil Federal forfeiture proceedings, and through equitable sharing of forfeited funds and property controlled by the U.S. Department of Justice. Forfeiture proceeds have severe restrictions mandated by statutes and U.S. Department of Justice policy as to how they are used. Forfeiture funds cannot be used in lieu of the OIG's regular appropriations.
 

mrj

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Mike, what was the fraud/scandal, who were the "players", and how were they punished?

Seems like that would be interesting reading.
MRJ
 

Mike

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MRJ said:
Mike, what was the fraud/scandal, who were the "players", and how were they punished?

Seems like that would be interesting reading.
MRJ

I think it was Lyndon Johnson and Billy Sol Estes and that gang. It got real ugly from what I remember my dad talking about. Even a few murders that LBJ was directly tied to, and I mean directly.
They were illegally obtaining USDA subsidies "BIG TIME".
Among other things I'm sure.
 

Mike

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Billie Sol Estes was born in Abilene, Texas, in 1924. After marrying in 1946 he moved to the small town of Pecos. As a result of high irrigation costs, local farmers found it difficult to make profits from their cotton crops. Estes started up a company providing irrigation pumps that used cheap natural gas. Farmers had previously used irrigation pumps powered by electricity. Estes also sold anhydrous ammonia as a fertilizer. This was a great success and Estes soon became a wealthy businessman.

Estes's business encountered problems when the Department of Agriculture began to control the production of cotton. Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could and could not plant. In 1958 Estes made contact with Lyndon B. Johnson. Over the next couple of years Estes ran a vast scam getting federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes he obtained $21 million a year for "growing" and "storing" non-existent crops of cotton.

Henry Marshall, a Department of Agriculture official in Bryan, Texas, was found dead on 3rd June 1961. Marshall was the official who originally approved Billie Sol Estes' cotton allotments. Officially he had committed suicide but rumours began to circulate that Marshall had been killed because he had become aware of Estes' scam.

On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek's head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

On 24th June, 1962, Senator John McClellan of Arkansas announced that his Permanent Investigations Committee would be looking into the activities of Estes. On 27th July one witness testified that Lyndon B. Johnson was getting a rake-off from the federal agricultural subsidies that Estes had been obtaining.

Estes trial began in October 1962. John Cofer, who was also Lyndon Johnson's lawyer, refused to put Estes on the witness stand. Estes was found guilty of fraud and sentenced to eight years in prison. Federal proceedings against Estes began in March 1963. He was eventually charged with fraud regarding mortgages of more that $24 million. Estes was found guilty and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.
 

mrj

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Mike said:
Billie Sol Estes was born in Abilene, Texas, in 1924. After marrying in 1946 he moved to the small town of Pecos. As a result of high irrigation costs, local farmers found it difficult to make profits from their cotton crops. Estes started up a company providing irrigation pumps that used cheap natural gas. Farmers had previously used irrigation pumps powered by electricity. Estes also sold anhydrous ammonia as a fertilizer. This was a great success and Estes soon became a wealthy businessman.

Estes's business encountered problems when the Department of Agriculture began to control the production of cotton. Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could and could not plant. In 1958 Estes made contact with Lyndon B. Johnson. Over the next couple of years Estes ran a vast scam getting federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes he obtained $21 million a year for "growing" and "storing" non-existent crops of cotton.

Henry Marshall, a Department of Agriculture official in Bryan, Texas, was found dead on 3rd June 1961. Marshall was the official who originally approved Billie Sol Estes' cotton allotments. Officially he had committed suicide but rumours began to circulate that Marshall had been killed because he had become aware of Estes' scam.

On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek's head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

On 24th June, 1962, Senator John McClellan of Arkansas announced that his Permanent Investigations Committee would be looking into the activities of Estes. On 27th July one witness testified that Lyndon B. Johnson was getting a rake-off from the federal agricultural subsidies that Estes had been obtaining.

Estes trial began in October 1962. John Cofer, who was also Lyndon Johnson's lawyer, refused to put Estes on the witness stand. Estes was found guilty of fraud and sentenced to eight years in prison. Federal proceedings against Estes began in March 1963. He was eventually charged with fraud regarding mortgages of more that $24 million. Estes was found guilty and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.

Thanks, Mike. I had forgotten about that. Was young and busy with little kids back then so didn't pay much attention to politics and such.

BTW, how does one find such a dossier on someone? Is that kind of stuff just available on the internet, or what? Interesting!

MRJ
 

agman

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Mike said:
Billie Sol Estes was born in Abilene, Texas, in 1924. After marrying in 1946 he moved to the small town of Pecos. As a result of high irrigation costs, local farmers found it difficult to make profits from their cotton crops. Estes started up a company providing irrigation pumps that used cheap natural gas. Farmers had previously used irrigation pumps powered by electricity. Estes also sold anhydrous ammonia as a fertilizer. This was a great success and Estes soon became a wealthy businessman.

Estes's business encountered problems when the Department of Agriculture began to control the production of cotton. Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could and could not plant. In 1958 Estes made contact with Lyndon B. Johnson. Over the next couple of years Estes ran a vast scam getting federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes he obtained $21 million a year for "growing" and "storing" non-existent crops of cotton.

Henry Marshall, a Department of Agriculture official in Bryan, Texas, was found dead on 3rd June 1961. Marshall was the official who originally approved Billie Sol Estes' cotton allotments. Officially he had committed suicide but rumours began to circulate that Marshall had been killed because he had become aware of Estes' scam.

On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek's head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

On 24th June, 1962, Senator John McClellan of Arkansas announced that his Permanent Investigations Committee would be looking into the activities of Estes. On 27th July one witness testified that Lyndon B. Johnson was getting a rake-off from the federal agricultural subsidies that Estes had been obtaining.

Estes trial began in October 1962. John Cofer, who was also Lyndon Johnson's lawyer, refused to put Estes on the witness stand. Estes was found guilty of fraud and sentenced to eight years in prison. Federal proceedings against Estes began in March 1963. He was eventually charged with fraud regarding mortgages of more that $24 million. Estes was found guilty and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.

Mike, he was indited for collecting storage fees for soybean oil which he never had. Tanks were empty. His storage facility looked like a fuel depot. Big tanks, all empty. I still remember seeing the pictures on TV and saw a still picture during the past year showing the empty tanks and a caption depicting the incident.
 
A

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agman said:
Mike said:
Billie Sol Estes was born in Abilene, Texas, in 1924. After marrying in 1946 he moved to the small town of Pecos. As a result of high irrigation costs, local farmers found it difficult to make profits from their cotton crops. Estes started up a company providing irrigation pumps that used cheap natural gas. Farmers had previously used irrigation pumps powered by electricity. Estes also sold anhydrous ammonia as a fertilizer. This was a great success and Estes soon became a wealthy businessman.

Estes's business encountered problems when the Department of Agriculture began to control the production of cotton. Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could and could not plant. In 1958 Estes made contact with Lyndon B. Johnson. Over the next couple of years Estes ran a vast scam getting federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes he obtained $21 million a year for "growing" and "storing" non-existent crops of cotton.

Henry Marshall, a Department of Agriculture official in Bryan, Texas, was found dead on 3rd June 1961. Marshall was the official who originally approved Billie Sol Estes' cotton allotments. Officially he had committed suicide but rumours began to circulate that Marshall had been killed because he had become aware of Estes' scam.

On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek's head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

On 24th June, 1962, Senator John McClellan of Arkansas announced that his Permanent Investigations Committee would be looking into the activities of Estes. On 27th July one witness testified that Lyndon B. Johnson was getting a rake-off from the federal agricultural subsidies that Estes had been obtaining.

Estes trial began in October 1962. John Cofer, who was also Lyndon Johnson's lawyer, refused to put Estes on the witness stand. Estes was found guilty of fraud and sentenced to eight years in prison. Federal proceedings against Estes began in March 1963. He was eventually charged with fraud regarding mortgages of more that $24 million. Estes was found guilty and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.

Mike, he was indited for collecting storage fees for soybean oil which he never had. Tanks were empty. His storage facility looked like a fuel depot. Big tanks, all empty. I still remember seeing the pictures on TV and saw a still picture during the past year showing the empty tanks and a caption depicting the incident.

Reminds me of the millions $ worth of government insured wheat that I have seen reported stolen over the years...Government inspector recorded it was there when he inspected the bins last fall or a year or two ago, and now its all gone-- With one guy we figured that the semi would have had to sit in his yard next to his house for a week loading out of his grainbins in order for the amount he reported to have been stolen-- then when local authorities question it (federal crime)- it goes no further....USDA hasn't got the personel available to follow up....Some comes about because of inept untrained or uncaring federal inspectors (where have we heard that before :???: ) that have no idea how to measure a grain bin-just write down and certify what is told them-- but others are out and out theft of government money- which require someone getting payoffs to falsify the info :mad: :cry: ...
 

mrj

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Oldtimer said:
agman said:
Mike said:
Billie Sol Estes was born in Abilene, Texas, in 1924. After marrying in 1946 he moved to the small town of Pecos. As a result of high irrigation costs, local farmers found it difficult to make profits from their cotton crops. Estes started up a company providing irrigation pumps that used cheap natural gas. Farmers had previously used irrigation pumps powered by electricity. Estes also sold anhydrous ammonia as a fertilizer. This was a great success and Estes soon became a wealthy businessman.

Estes's business encountered problems when the Department of Agriculture began to control the production of cotton. Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could and could not plant. In 1958 Estes made contact with Lyndon B. Johnson. Over the next couple of years Estes ran a vast scam getting federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes he obtained $21 million a year for "growing" and "storing" non-existent crops of cotton.

Henry Marshall, a Department of Agriculture official in Bryan, Texas, was found dead on 3rd June 1961. Marshall was the official who originally approved Billie Sol Estes' cotton allotments. Officially he had committed suicide but rumours began to circulate that Marshall had been killed because he had become aware of Estes' scam.

On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek's head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

On 24th June, 1962, Senator John McClellan of Arkansas announced that his Permanent Investigations Committee would be looking into the activities of Estes. On 27th July one witness testified that Lyndon B. Johnson was getting a rake-off from the federal agricultural subsidies that Estes had been obtaining.

Estes trial began in October 1962. John Cofer, who was also Lyndon Johnson's lawyer, refused to put Estes on the witness stand. Estes was found guilty of fraud and sentenced to eight years in prison. Federal proceedings against Estes began in March 1963. He was eventually charged with fraud regarding mortgages of more that $24 million. Estes was found guilty and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.

Mike, he was indited for collecting storage fees for soybean oil which he never had. Tanks were empty. His storage facility looked like a fuel depot. Big tanks, all empty. I still remember seeing the pictures on TV and saw a still picture during the past year showing the empty tanks and a caption depicting the incident.

Reminds me of the millions $ worth of government insured wheat that I have seen reported stolen over the years...Government inspector recorded it was there when he inspected the bins last fall or a year or two ago, and now its all gone-- With one guy we figured that the semi would have had to sit in his yard next to his house for a week loading out of his grainbins in order for the amount he reported to have been stolen-- then when local authorities question it (federal crime)- it goes no further....USDA hasn't got the personel available to follow up....Some comes about because of inept untrained or uncaring federal inspectors (where have we heard that before :???: ) that have no idea how to measure a grain bin-just write down and certify what is told them-- but others are out and out theft of government money- which require someone getting payoffs to falsify the info :mad: :cry: ...

An inspector once told me that if no one was home when they came to "inspect" (and they were not allowed to make an appointment, but had to show up un-announced), they were to "estimate" what grains and how much each bin contained. Absolutely set up for fraud and failure, IMO.

MRJ
 

Mike

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MRJ:"An inspector once told me that if no one was home when they came to "inspect" (and they were not allowed to make an appointment, but had to show up un-announced), they were to "estimate" what grains and how much each bin contained. Absolutely set up for fraud and failure, IMO.

MRJ"

That is "our" good ole USD of A. Make you feel all warm and comfy inside?
 

Murgen

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Stories like that are what you want getting out to the media too!

Makes them feel all warm and fuzzy also!
 

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Add this to LBJ'S involvement in JFK"S assasination and it's no wonder Lady Bird did not pursue her threat to sue the History channel and MGM studios for publisizing all that info and slandering "his good name." Just goes to show you how deep the Texas mafia runs into our govt. and how they control our govt. for their benefit. Kind of makes you wonder what's going on now with all the scandles and NAFTA etc.
 

mrj

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walk said:
Exactly where does your president come from? :???: :wink:


Pres. GWBush is not a "real" born and raised Texan. And he is a Republican. Big difference!

Texas Mafia just doesn't make sense. Lyndon and friends were political hacks first and foremost, IMO. Cheating on the farm bill may have been on a larger scale in TX.......what isn't?.......but it certainly is not the only place......and it isn't just high-rollers who do so......after all, as the saying goes: the ink never gets a chance to dry on a new farm bill till many farmers have figured out a way to cheat on the system.......if we have heard people brag about that, most likely others have as well. And also heard the "the big outfits all do it, so I'm just getting my share" excuse.

MRJ

MRJ
 

Tam

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Reader the second wrote
There is evidence going back to the 1960s of BSE in Wisconsin downers for example.

:shock: Well well well :shock: I thought the US was BSE free until last Friday. Please do tell us more Reader. :nod: Do you have some facts to back up this statement?
 

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