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Japan- Maybe Next Year

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I can just hear it now-- Next year or the year or two after-- when Japan finally opens its doors- SH__ , USDA and NCBA will be declaring how they have won-- see we told you we don't need to let Creekstone test and science will prevail :wink: :lol:

Reminds me of the guy that loses 2 calf crops in a row and then gets a 100% calving rate- braggin about how good he did.....
:???:

Japan's food-safety group not ready to lift U.S. beef ban

by Deborah Silver on 9/27/2005 for Meatingplace.com




Japan's Food Safety Commission decided that it needs more time to evaluate U.S. safeguard measures before deciding to lift its 20-month ban on U.S. beef imports.

At a meeting held Monday, commission members compared the risk of contracting bovine spongiform encephalopathy from U.S. beef and organs with the risk posed from homegrown product. It concluded that the risk of BSE infection from U.S. cattle is several times higher than from Japanese beef.

The commission also discussed what to include in its final recommendations to be submitted to the government by year-end. According to an unofficial draft published on the commission's Web site, it does not believe the safety of U.S. beef can be ensured under U.S. safeguards alone and recommends restricting imports to meat from cattle younger than 21 months with birth certificates. In addition, if and when imports are resumed, Japanese agricultural officials should conduct on-site inspections of U.S. operations.

Commission chief Yasuhiro Yoshikawa said after Monday's meeting that the group is in no hurry to make a decision regarding the ban. "Each panelist has a different opinion, and it requires thorough discussion to arrive at a conclusion," he said. "There is not need to give them pressure to rush."


 

Sandhusker

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If they don't want our beef, that is their choice. I would think we could find a few things of theirs that we don't need as well.
 

RobertMac

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...recommends restricting imports to meat from cattle younger than 21 months with birth certificates.

Seems they also have a problem with the beef/cattle we are importing...I thought opening our borders was suppose to help this issue??? :???: :?
 

Bill

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RobertMac said:
...recommends restricting imports to meat from cattle younger than 21 months with birth certificates.

Seems they also have a problem with the beef/cattle we are importing...I thought opening our borders was suppose to help this issue??? :???: :?
The Japanese food safety commission recommends to the JAPANESE gov't that Birth Certificates be available for US cattle entering JAPAN not cattle entering the US from other countries.

You still don't have one huge task accomplished though and that is an MID program. The US opening its borders did help with a lot of countries the problem is that you've been sitting and watching and arguing about COOL for the last five years or so while Canada implemented and improved it's MID system.

The US is still dragging Canada down as Japan will open to both countries simultaneously. The US needs to get it's act together and catch up to the rest of the world.
 

HAY MAKER

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Roberts: Further Japanese Delay of Beef Trade Merits Actions



WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Senator Pat Roberts today denounced the decision by the Japanese Food Safety Commission to indefinitely delay the resumption of beef trade with the U.S. and indicated his intent to send a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Rob Portman calling for retaliatory economic action against Japanese goods.



"I am frustrated by the unreasonable and unscientific findings of the Japanese Food Safety Commission," Senator Roberts said. "They have been unresponsive to warnings by Congress, and U.S. diplomatic efforts, including those of President Bush, by demanding excessive documentation regarding the safety of American beef. None of these demands have anything to do with sound science."



At issue was the announcement yesterday by the Japanese Food Safety Commission regarding their failure to reach a conclusion on the resumption of beef trade with the U.S. "And to add insult to injury," Roberts said, "the commission said deliberations regarding U.S. beef will continue indefinitely."



"The facts are clear, Japan has had 20 confirmed cases of BSE since October 2004 while the United States has had two," Senator Roberts said. "It is simply inaccurate to call the U.S. beef supply unsafe. The numbers do not add up."



Last week Senator Roberts and Senator Wayne Allard (R-CO) successfully led an effort to pass a sense of the Senate Resolution to delay imports of Japanese beef into the U.S. until Japan agrees to resume imports of American beef. Additionally, Senator Roberts strongly supported the inclusion of an amendment to the Agriculture Appropriations Bill which prohibits USDA from using funds to finalize the rule in regards to imports of Japanese beef, until Japan accepts American beef.



Its plain to see this foot dragging has gone on long enough,if we are to normalize trade,Japan has to do her part...............good luck
 

Mike

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The following article is old, but addresses the role of the USDA and their incompetence in getting requested info to the Japs.


Japan's mad cow questions go unanswered
By Steve Mitchell
United Press International
Published 5/15/2004 8:16 AM

WASHINGTON, May 15 (UPI) -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture has failed to supply the number of cows exhibiting signs of a brain disorder it has tested for mad cow disease to Japanese authorities, who requested the information more than four months ago, an official told United Press International.

The failure to provide the information comes amid the recent revelation USDA officials did not test an animal displaying brain disorder symptoms consistent with mad cow disease at a Texas plant in April.

The lack of this data also could hamper ongoing negations aimed at reopening Japan's borders to U.S. beef. Those negotiations are slated to gear up again next week in Tokyo. Japan has resisted reopening its borders since shutting them in December, after a cow infected with mad cow disease was detected in Washington state.

Animals with brain disorder or central nervous system symptoms are considered the most likely to be infected with mad cow disease -- the reason the USDA's official policy is to test all such animals.

That also is the reason Japanese authorities have requested the information on the CNS cows.

"Our technical people are asking for that (because) if you tested more of these animals, it's a more accurate survey" of whether the herds are infected, a Japanese official, who requested anonymity, told UPI.

Although the Japanese government requested this information in January, the official said the USDA has not yet provided any substantial statistics.

"We received a one-page document" showing the number of dead and downer cows -- those unable to stand -- that have been tested, the official said. But there is no information on the number of tested animals with CNS signs, he added.

The USDA has also failed to address other questions about how the agency is ensuring mad cow disease does not infect U.S. herds, the official said. This has created a sense of frustration among Japanese authorities.

"We ask many questions to them, but they answered quite few," the official said. When the USDA does provide information "it's only (a) partial answer -- we don't receive (a) full answer," he said. "The Japanese people are frustrated" by this, he added.
 

PORKER

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As I See These Remarks;According to an unofficial draft published on the commission's Web site,JAPAN it does not believe the safety of U.S. beef can be ensured under U.S. safeguards alone and recommends restricting imports to meat from cattle younger than 21 months with birth certificates.
In addition, if and when imports are resumed, Japanese agricultural officials should conduct on-site inspections of U.S. operations.

So we see that the USDA has NO options but to export beef truefully to Japan.The Exporters are the ones with the gun to their head as the importers say PROVEIT in no other terms.
Well the only way it's going to happen is keep the SAME records here as is required in Japan inorder to EXPORT from MEXICO,United STATES,and CANADA. WHAT is needed is SSI's PASTURE to PLATE Records.
 

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