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Just wait until PETA gets a hold of this............

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Mike

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Bull Burger said:
Mike,

Check out: http://www.newstarget.com/beef.html Looks like a vegetarian leaning site.

I know. That's what scares me. They have it out for us to start with and will only try to fuel the fire.
 
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Anonymous

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R-Calf said:
reader (the Second) said:
The article (again, fringe and conspiracy oriented) says: "The USDA's mad cow disease testing program is a sham: it doesn't test many cows showing neurological symptoms, it falsified records of one cow to make sure it received "downer" status, and it doesn't test healthy-looking cattle at all! These are the accusations from the USDA's own inspector general and various Senators who are hammering the USDA for its lackluster practices."

If the USDA were testing a significant number of 4D, it would be doing EXACTLY what is recommended by the most knowledgeable TSE experts, so I don't think confining most of the testing to 4D is wrong. However, they have to test in the hundreds of thousands annually. According to the quote from Lisa Ferguson I posted yesterday, there are up to 600,000 downers. And they have to incentivize the producers to notify of 4D cattle. And they have to test on the farm. Unfortunately, I don't believe that this is being done and the 40,000 to be tested in 2005 is WAY too small a number in such a large high risk population.

If we can't butcher the 4D animals then they don't need to be tested for they will never enter the food supply. Is it worth shaking consumer confidence over a potential postive BSE cow when that cow would never enter the food supply? You and the Canucks are so hell bent for the US to find a case of BSE it makes me sick.


EXACTLY!
T H A N K Y O U Nebrusker.
Finally somone who says exactly what many believe Americans have been practicing for years.
 

fedup2

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I wouldn't worry about peta getting a hold of this article as I am sure they are partly responsilbe for printing it and sponsoring that site. Here are some of their headlines and links:

Related Articles: The shocking truth of how the USDA puts beef industry profits ahead of public health...

Mad cow cover-up! Japan doesn't trust USDA's position on safety of U.S. beef...

Don't eat that veal! The USDA gives in to industry pressure and allows veal calves pumped full of illegal hormones to be sold into the human food supply!

Discover the best Food Guide Pyramid yet created: is it really Atkins?

The shocking truth of how the USDA hides mad cow disease by making sure young cows don't get tested at all...

The real story behind how the USDA Food Guide Pyramid was developed (and why you can't trust it).

Then follow their recommended link and you get this!

Yes! The best way to protect yourself and your family is to stop eating animal products and choose a healthy vegan diet. A vegan diet not only protects you from mad cow disease, but is the most effective way to prevent foodborne illness, heart disease, strokes, and many other ailments. Click here for a FREE vegetarian starter kit to help you get started.

Can't believe someone even posted this garbage! :mad:
 

Manitoba_Rancher

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Nebrusker is no more than a wanna be rancher himself. I take pride in reading your responses Reader and everyone else who posts on here exept R-calf (jarred,Nebrusker) Hes a baby living inside a 25 year olds body with a gigantic mouth he doesnt know how to shut!!!!!! Hes a wanna be college kid with no cattle!!!!!!!
 
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Anonymous

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"I'm fairly sure that he's doing R-CALF a disservice by his posts since what he just implied was that his position is ONLY based on economic protectionism, not on BSE.

I haven't looked at R-CALF's releases recently but I assume they are in favor of continued increased testing of 4D in the U.S. to prove to the world that the U.S. does not have a problem. Otherwise, they really are blatant protectionists."



R-Calf has not said they are in favour of increased testing of 4-Ds and without a doubt their position is quite clearly based on economic protectionism. That is why they were founded and why their supporters continue to support them. They sure aren't donating calves to fund lobbying for increased testing of 4Ds but to keep the border to Canada closed.

I give Nebrusker credit for his honesty in this thread.
 

Les

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A cop pulls over nebrusker on the hiway,and says to neb."you have any ID?" Neb says "bout what"
 

Manitoba_Rancher

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Some tourists are in Nebraska and they meet Nebrusker in a convience store. They ask him for directions out of town but he just mumbles on as usual. They start to get digruntled and finally say to him "college boy have you even got a clue" He responds who do you think I am Sherlock Holmes!
 

Tam

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R-Calf said:
If we can't butcher the 4D animals then they don't need to be tested for they will never enter the food supply. Is it worth shaking consumer confidence over a potential postive BSE cow when that cow would never enter the food supply? You and the Canucks are so hell bent for the US to find a case of BSE it makes me sick.

Does that go for Canada too the three animals that we found in Canada were not slaughter animals they were 4D's that were not eaten. R-CALF is shaking confidence in the Canadian beef by using test results from meat that never made it into the food chain. You make this out to be nothing to worry about when it comes to the US beef but you and R-CALF are using those exact animals against Canada. You are so two faces it makes me sick. You say we are to 100% test but you won't even test the catagory that was recommended by the OIE as it may shake consumer confidence. If R-CALF had been lieing about our beef and trying to destroy us with your blessings you wouldn't have to fear the testing to find the true prevalance now would you.
 
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Anonymous

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reader (the Second) said:
Anonymous said:
"I'm fairly sure that he's doing R-CALF a disservice by his posts since what he just implied was that his position is ONLY based on economic protectionism, not on BSE.

I haven't looked at R-CALF's releases recently but I assume they are in favor of continued increased testing of 4D in the U.S. to prove to the world that the U.S. does not have a problem. Otherwise, they really are blatant protectionists."



R-Calf has not said they are in favour of increased testing of 4-Ds and without a doubt their position is quite clearly based on economic protectionism. That is why they were founded and why their supporters continue to support them. They sure aren't donating calves to fund lobbying for increased testing of 4Ds but to keep the border to Canada closed.

I give Nebrusker credit for his honesty in this thread.

Interesting. Thanks. Let's see what others think. I can see that R-CALF is representing what they think is best economically for U.S. producers. I don't think that's how they are pitching it however (or not openly).

Reader 2- Need to put my two bits worth in-- I think R-CALF is the only organization that has came out and said "test until we see what the extent of the problem is"-also asked for Canada to test all until the extent of their problem is known--- also the only one that has asked USDA to track down Canadian cattle in the US, which has been standard past policy with cattle coming in from a country that has been found to have BSE--they also are the only organization that asked USDA to allow Creekstone to test everything- let private enterprise pay for some of the cost of finding if we have a problem....They have also called for the removal of all ruminant rendered products from all livestock feed, including chicken litter--They also are the only organization that has said we need to move slowly on reducing all rules relating to importing from known BSE countries....They have called for a mandatory country of origin labeling law so that consumers can choose for themselves which beef they feel is safe or which they want to eat....They are also the only organization that has been open with the consumers and consumer groups and actually recognized that importing from a country with a higher BSE risk can pose a higher risk for consumers- and informing these consumers that USDA has been playing fast and carefree with the rules that they had previously set up to protect consumers and the US cattle herd.....

I agree they are looking at the financial end of the industry-- they are looking at getting the best markets for US cattlemen and trying to guarantee that the industry doesn't get ruined in years to come with BSE and vCJD cases showing up-- if we have a problem, identify it now and eliminate it- don't ignore it..........Definitely USDA or AMI are not looking at the future- just which packer can profit the most at the present time and which politician can stuff his pockets...
 
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Anonymous

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Our ability to export will continue to be impacted negatively as it has been until we come in line with OIE and common practice in Europe/Japan.

US Guidelines;
A. Experience in Europe has shown that testing high-risk cattle is the method most likely to identify BSE if it is present. Therefore, USDA has tailored its testing program to collect the majority of samples from the following categories:

* Nonambulatory cattle;
* Cattle exhibiting signs of a central nervous system disorder;
* Cattle exhibiting other signs that may be associated with BSE, such as emaciation or injury; and
* Dead cattle.

USDA personnel will also sample all cattle condemned on ante-mortem inspection by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse_testing/faq.html#highrisk

Compared to Euro testing;
"What can the test do early in the infection?

No method will detect BSE early in the infection. BSE has an average incubation period of 4-6 years. Therefore the EU testing programmes are targeted at animals over 30 months."

"In addition to the compulsory examination of all animals showing signs suggestive of BSE, rapid post mortem testing for BSE must, as of 1 January 2001, be carried out on:

- all cattle over 30 months of age slaughtered as emergencies or showing signs of any kind of illness at the ante mortem inspection in the slaughterhouse;

- a random sample of cattle that have died on the farm;

- healthy animals over 30 months destined for human consumption (with the exception of Austria, Sweden and Finland, where a scientific assessment shows that the risk of BSE is lower).

http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/index.jsp?file=areasofi/bse/bse_weekly.xml

Implying that the EU tests more rigiriously then the US is in fact distorting one key fact : " THe EU has had 10, confirmed cases in 2005 compared to the US's NONE., add in the past cases, and one can see the need for the Extensive testing in Europe. , Japan has11
http://www.us.emb-japan.go.jp/english/html/fafacts/bse/bse.htm


NOW on the OIE PLEASE READ carefully!!!

"The OIE standards on BSE do not suggest a total embargo of animals and animal products coming from BSE-infected countries, not even from countries that have a high BSE risk, according to the OIE statement. To protect human and animal health, the standards recommend risk-mitigating measures that match the degree of risk in the infected countries."

"
In fact, the United States, Canada, and Mexico are among the countries that have not completely followed the OIE standards, Dr. Fernandez said. All three countries have trade regulations that are more restrictive than the OIE guidelines recommend. He said the U.S. BSE measures tried to take into account the scientific understanding of BSE and public safety;
http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/dec03/031215i.asp

So in FACT to bring our "industry standards" in compliance with other countries and the OIE, we would in fact have to "weaken" our current standards. So short of testing every "cow" which you claim not to want we are above the common standards of the EU, Japan and the OIE.

I do not claim to know much about BSE or it's non-existance in the market, But research proves that most cases stem from the UK market and the EU,. while I am sure that even Canada's case could be traced to this one market, it would be wrong to destroy the whole of the industry in an effort to make a point. BSE is not a problem within the US market due to aggressive practices taken, not lax rules.
 

Murgen

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R-calf/Nebrusker "That is the most retarded thing i've ever read. You get the award for the dumbest Canuck on this board. Be proud of your ITT Technical college degree, i'll bet you had to work real hard for it. Good luck with your humor attempts, it's about as bad as your ranching operation."

Actually Nebrusker, not everyone reads Manitoba Rancher's posts, it's you we watch to see if your comments get more stupid as the days go by. That's the only reason I read your posts, not much point in reading them for facts.

And when was the last time you were in Manitoba? Could you find it on a map? If you do come up, phone first, we'll have a party and the welcome wagon bring gifts for you. March 8th might be a good date to come, we plan to have a big party here in Canada. That'll be the day we let you know that there will be less cattle coming south, because our export markets have expanded.
 
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Anonymous

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Businessweek USA MARCH 7, 2005 • Editions: N. America | Europe | Asia | Edition Preference



SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Mad Cow's Stubborn Mystery
Scientists still know far too little about it -- and the feds are making rules in the dark

Nearly a decade ago, clusters of young people in Britain started suffering mysterious symptoms. First they became depressed and withdrawn, prone to crying fits, anxiety attacks, and bouts of physical pain. Within months they lost the capacity to remember or speak, then they slipped into comas and died. Autopsies showed brains ravaged by a novel form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, which they contracted by eating infected beef. Public health experts feared an epidemic, with some predicting that tens of thousands of people would eventually die.

So far the predictions appear overly alarmist. Only 159 people worldwide are known to have died from eating BSE-infected meat -- including a Japanese man whose death from the disease was confirmed on Feb. 3. But each new case is a painful reminder of the unanswered questions that swirl around mad cow and similar scourges in sheep, deer, and elk. Despite a decade of intense investigation, scientists still disagree about how these diseases are transmitted, how long they can incubate without symptoms, if they can be cured, and what steps should be taken to lessen the toll. In recent months scientists have made some startling discoveries. Yet they are dismayed that mad cow is so slow to yield its secrets.

Those many uncertainties are in the spotlight right now as the Agriculture Dept. prepares to resume trading of some live cows and packaged beef with Canada on Mar. 7. Restrictions have been in place since May, 2003, when a mad cow was discovered in Canada. Three more have been found since, including one animal that was imported to the U.S. and slaughtered in December, 2003. The USDA is torn between its mission to protect public health, its commitments to meatpackers and ranchers who want access to Canadian cattle, and its desire to facilitate U.S. exports. The problems won't be resolved until scientists get a firmer grip on the pathology of the disease.

Scientists such as Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner, a neurologist at the University of California at San Francisco, are making progress. Prusiner won a Nobel prize in 1997 for his discovery that proteins in the brains of mad cow victims -- both animal and human -- exhibit characteristic malformations. These proteins, called prions, exist in a benign form in many bodily tissues. But when they become misfolded, they can turn both toxic and infectious, eating holes in the brain.

SLIPPING THROUGH?
Prusiner's theory isn't universally accepted. But his experiments continue to illuminate the prion theory. In July, Prusiner's team at UCSF reported that it had synthesized prions to resemble their disease-causing counterparts. The scientists injected the lab-made prions into mice, and more than a year later the rodents developed diseases that resembled mad cow. "This tells us that prion diseases can occur in many forms," says Dr. Giuseppe Legname, UCSF neurologist. If that's the case, he adds, some people who die of undiagnosed brain diseases may actually be infected with prions that are slipping by undetected. "That has quite frightening implications," Legname says.

Scientists across the pond are also chasing elusive rogue prions. In December, British researchers reported that some humans appear to be protected from BSE by their genetic makeup. But they also found that even the mice that had the same genetic barrier eventually developed a form of prion disease -- one that had never been seen before.

To determine if humans might be infected with yet-undiscovered strains of prion diseases, the researchers are urging health authorities around the world to perform more autopsies on people who die of mysterious brain disorders. Part of the goal is to see if other prion-based illnesses -- such as chronic wasting disease in deer and elk -- are jumping from animals to humans. In the U.S., for example, the Centers for Disease Control is funding scientists in Colorado and Wyoming who are checking death records against hunting licenses. They're trying to determine if any hunters got sick from eating game. So far they haven't found any evidence of a link.

The only way to confirm and identify prion diseases today is to examine brain tissue after death. Only about 66% of suspected cases are autopsied each year. The number should be 75% or more, says Dr. Pierluigi Gambetti, director of the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center at Case Western Reserve University. He likens the current situation to a faulty airport security system in which there are multiple lines of passengers subjected to different levels of scrutiny. "How would you feel if one line of people went through unchecked?" he asks. "We may be missing that critical case that tells us chronic wasting disease is passing from animals to humans." With funding from the CDC, Gambetti is setting up autopsy centers in state health departments around the country that will subsidize the procedure for families who can't afford it.

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health are grappling with the prion-disease problem lower down on the food chain. The NIH's Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Mont., has launched a number of studies designed to unravel the mysteries of cross-species transmission. In a series of experiments they injected a hamster form of corrupted prions into mice. The mice were not visibly affected, but when tiny bits of their brains were injected back into healthy hamsters and mice, some rodents got sick. Eventually specific strains developed that could kill mice, hamsters, or both.

LAYING BLAME
Given how much remains unknown, U.S. restrictions on Canadian cattle and beef seem prudent. But there are economic costs. Tyson Foods Inc. (TSN ) took a $61 million charge against its fourth-quarter earnings last year because it couldn't import live cows from Canada. Nor could it export beef to Japan and other countries that restricted imports of American beef in the wake of the 2003 incident. The National Cattlemen's Beef Assn. (NCBA) reckons the U.S. has lost $3 billion in export sales since those bans went into place.

Who is to blame? Consumer groups say the beef industry got the U.S. into this predicament by consistently thwarting calls to test cattle more aggressively. And even some within the NCBA agree that further research is urgently needed. "We should follow the science," says Gary Weber, an executive director at the NCBA.

Some good news has emerged from Britain. In a recent study, 12 patients with the human form of BSE had a drug normally used to treat urinary tract infections injected directly into their brains. This seems to have cut prion production and limited brain damage. Two years later, only one patient has died. "Five years ago, no one was even thinking about treatments," says Dr. Stephen Dealler, a medical microbiologist at Britain's Lancaster Royal Infirmary who studies prion diseases. "I am very hopeful." It's a tiny bit of headway in the global effort to understand -- and ultimately conquer -- one of the world's most puzzling scourges.
 
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Anonymous

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Anonymous said:
Businessweek USA MARCH 7, 2005 • Editions: N. America | Europe | Asia | Edition Preference



SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Mad Cow's Stubborn Mystery
Scientists still know far too little about it -- and the feds are making rules in the dark

That title pretty well sums up the whole situation... And look at the press date for the issue- the same day the border is proposed to open....

Is Businessweek USA an agenda focused publication?.........
 

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