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Live Animal Test For Infectious Prion Protein Works!!

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bse-tester

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Hi folks, I am coming aboard to share with you the fact that our company has just fired off a letter to Secretary Johanns advising him that we at BSE Prion Solutions Inc, located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, have begun discussions with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Cleveland, Ohio, to conduct the final validation of our "Live Animal Urine Test" for a number of known TSE's including BSE and Scrapie. The Pathology Department of CWRU has spent the last two years evaluating our "BSE/CJD Test Kit" and have recently published the results of that evaluation. We find that since our Test Kit works extremely well, it is time to tell the world that a truly exciting live test is coming soon. The British Government Laboratory at Weybridge, UK has indicated their desire to provide us with infectious urine from Scrapie infected Sheep and possibly from BSE infected cattle. Also, the EFSA in Brussels has sent us their testing program in order for us to follow it precisely in the manner in which they would conduct a validation process for consideration of any test procedure beingcoming the universally accepted Gold Standard Test. We are extremely excited about the fact that we intend to bring to North America the potential of finally having an inexpensive live animal test that will positively identify whether or not any animal is carrying the infectious prion protein long before it shows any signs of symptoms, simply by taking a urine sample and getting the results back within 24 hours.
 

rkaiser

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I see you are using the word Infectious, bse tester.

Does that mean that you have proven that BSE is infectious. Or is there no money to be made in that kind of research?

Don't get me wrong, I hope your test gets used as testing is the only way right now.

But have you or your company ever considered looking for the cause of BSE rather than simply following unproven science?
 

Topper

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Does anybody else on this board find it disturbing that the lab in Weybridge seems to send BSE samples to every upstart lab that thinks they have found the TEST? I'm sure these labs are all ligitamate but it seems to me that there is a definite possibility for bse infected material to get into the wrong hands. Oh well I gotta go, I can hear a helicopter overhead.lol
 

whiteface

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I think if you're looking to try and make a little money off these very emotional and very skeptical, slowly (some of us rapidly) going broke cattle producers, bse-tester, you may get shot at by many black helicopters...
We all have one flying over our heads these days!
Have a good night all and thanks for reading from Canada!
 

bse-tester

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I am not here to blow smoke up anyone's caboose. I am here to mention to you that the lab in Cleveland, which just happens to be "The United States Prion Surveillance Center" is certainly not an upstart lab and the pathology department there has been working with prion disease for many years. My associates in the UK, Biotec Global, decided to use them to prove the "Urine Test" for the simple reason that the lab in Cleveland is world reknown and also the testing of the protocol would be at considerable arms length from the patent holder, Biotec Global. As for the comment "trying to make money" that is true, all tests are out there to make money. However, the cost of this test is going to be so incredibly inexpensive that it will add only about two (2) or three (3) cents to the cost of the meat per pound. When you consider that the market will not accept meat at any cost right now, what is 2 or 3 cents going to do for you?? Open or close a market?? You decide out there whether or not you would rather have a market that is stagnant or one that has life in it. I know which one I would choose. So please, just because we are not on someone elses site doesn't make us some sort of imposter. If any organization out there wishes to "see" our science, I would be more than happy to send them a copy of the protocol.
 

PORKER

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HEY BSE tester ,Your are the BEST NEWS since Ice Cream, all cattle systems need a test that is easy to do and has constant results.
 

Mike

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Hope you do well with it Bubba, but I think you're about 3 years late:


The information about the company was announced on 30th April 2002:

PrionSense Ltd.

The company develops diagnostics and therapeutics for people and animals with Prion diseases. Prions are responsible for Mad Cow Disease in animals and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.

In 2001, Priosense Ltd. was founded by Hadasit together with Dr. Ruth Gabizon of Hadassah's Department of Neurology and her research team. The company is committed to the research, development and marketing of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic products for the control and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

PrioSense's proprietary technology is based on Dr. Gabizon's biotechnological research. Her core breakthrough was the early identification of the Prion diseases: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) or "Mad Cow Disease"; Scrapie and variant Creutzfeldt- Jakob Disease (vCJD); through the detection of PrPSc in peripheral tissues.

The company's underlying technology represents a dramatic change in the diagnosis of BSE and vCJD. It introduced a shift from an expensive and cumbersome biopsy-based diagnosis to a simple Elisa-based in-vitro test that allows for mass screening and early diagnosis before the appearance of the clinical symptoms.

Priosense has already developed immunological methods for identifying PrPSc in urine, using commercially available antibodies. This technology was tested on hamsters, humans and cattle. PrioSense intends to utilize this innovative technology to develop a range of products and commercialize them by implementing a unique business model and forming strategic alliances with large veterinary and pharmaceutical companies.

The company also intends to use its proprietary technology and scientific capabilities to develop additional diagnostic tests and innovative target drugs for other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

PrioSense, will be launched under the auspices of Hadassit, Hadassah’s research and development arm. It will bring to the market a highly accurate commercial diagnostic kit for BSE, based on the work of the Experimental Neurology Laboratory team at the Hadassah–Hebrew University Medical Center at Ein Karem.

"We are very excited about the new range of applications for prion testing, particularly in the field of human medicine", says Dr. Bruno Oesch, CEO and Head of Research at Prionics. "For years we thought that live tests might not be possible based on the direct detection of prion proteins in body fluids, but might require testing of less reliable third markers. The prion protein correlates 100% with disease and therefore facilitates the highest accuracy in diagnosis of BSE and CJD."

"We are delighted to formally partner with Prionics," said Dr. Raphael Hofstein, managing Director of Hadasit and Director at PrioSense. "It is an honour to work with a company that is internationally recognised for its competence in prion diagnostics as well as for its technological and marketing skills."



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Bill

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Skeptics sound alarm over live test claims
this document web posted: Wednesday June 29, 2005

By Barbara Duckworth
Calgary bureau

The watchword is caution when it comes to discovering a BSE test that can be done on a live animal.

The recent announcement of a live test from a Calgary company has some scientists warning against too much optimism.

"There is a lot of research going on around the world and some projects in Canada. Our policy is to only look at commercial tests that have been validated in the European Union and have some international recognition," said Shane Renwick, director of the animal health laboratory service with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Live animal tests take time to prove they actually work because of the lengthy incubation period for the disease and the difficulty in finding BSE markers in blood or urine. The breakthrough may come through scrapie research because it shares certain elements with BSE.

"The feeling is we haven't got something that is right around the corner," said Renwick.

Markus Moser, chief executive of Prionics AG, a biotechnology company working on BSE diagnostic tests in Switerzland, said the Canadian company's live test is not specific to BSE.

Prionics is looking at live tests and does not feel the recent Vacci-Test Corp. announcement of an effective live test was groundbreaking because other companies are also looking at using the presence of the 14-3-3 protein as a marker of disease. The protein appears in brain cells when there is degeneration or damage.

"This is nothing new. It was detected in the late 1980s when people discovered this protein," said Moser.

He believes the risk of false positives is too high and the test may not be specific enough. Moser said there are two ways to develop live tests for BSE.

One is to look for the infectious prion in the blood or urine, but no one knows if it can be found in the fluid of infected animals, he said.

The other approach is similar to that of the Canadian company using 14-3-3 proteins.

Prionics is working on a live test but is staying Moser declined to discuss its progress.
 

bse-tester

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As I understand it, Prionics has failed to acheive anything more than 95% accuracy with there rapid test (blood) and that the test itself is reliant upon identifying the presence of proteins in the blood mix. Since blood is an extremely complex matrix, it is essential to recognize specific proteins and this is where the correct binding antibody comes into effect and therefore provides conclusive evidence of a specific protein that can readily be identified through a specific marker. Cattle producers and the consumers of meat and meat by-products both deserve to know that their product is completely PrPsc free, not simply 95 or 96 percent free.
 

Bill

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reader (the Second) said:
Bill said:
Skeptics sound alarm over live test claims
this document web posted: Wednesday June 29, 2005

By Barbara Duckworth
Calgary bureau

The watchword is caution when it comes to discovering a BSE test that can be done on a live animal.

The recent announcement of a live test from a Calgary company has some scientists warning against too much optimism.

"There is a lot of research going on around the world and some projects in Canada. Our policy is to only look at commercial tests that have been validated in the European Union and have some international recognition," said Shane Renwick, director of the animal health laboratory service with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Live animal tests take time to prove they actually work because of the lengthy incubation period for the disease and the difficulty in finding BSE markers in blood or urine. The breakthrough may come through scrapie research because it shares certain elements with BSE.

"The feeling is we haven't got something that is right around the corner," said Renwick.

Markus Moser, chief executive of Prionics AG, a biotechnology company working on BSE diagnostic tests in Switerzland, said the Canadian company's live test is not specific to BSE.

Prionics is looking at live tests and does not feel the recent Vacci-Test Corp. announcement of an effective live test was groundbreaking because other companies are also looking at using the presence of the 14-3-3 protein as a marker of disease. The protein appears in brain cells when there is degeneration or damage.

"This is nothing new. It was detected in the late 1980s when people discovered this protein," said Moser.

He believes the risk of false positives is too high and the test may not be specific enough. Moser said there are two ways to develop live tests for BSE.

One is to look for the infectious prion in the blood or urine, but no one knows if it can be found in the fluid of infected animals, he said.

The other approach is similar to that of the Canadian company using 14-3-3 proteins.

Prionics is working on a live test but is staying Moser declined to discuss its progress.

Our family members were tested with 14-3-3 test for CJD. The consensus is that late enough in the disease, taken together with symptoms and EEG, it is indicative. However it only measures a protein given off by dying brain cells (glial death) so many brain wasting diseases cause a positive 14-3-3 and in addition it can be negative and the autopsy come back positive... It's been used for quite a while and is nothing new.
That is why I posted it as the title of the article reads.
 

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