• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Mental health of returning soldiers

Help Support Ranchers.net:

Disagreeable

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
2,464
Reaction score
0
Link below: my emphasis.

Thirty percent of U.S. troops returning from the Iraq war have developed stress-related mental health problems three to four months after coming home, the Army’s surgeon general said Thursday.

The problems include anxiety, depression, nightmares, anger and an inability to concentrate, said Lt. Gen. Kevin Kiley and other military medical officials. A smaller number of troops, often with more severe symptoms, were diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, a serious mental illness.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8743574/
 

passin thru

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
2,603
Reaction score
0
And to think...................................
they are still in better shape than the majority of the left wing wackos with all of their stress-related mental health problems
 

passin thru

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
2,603
Reaction score
0
Now why would a comment about "left wing wackos" bother you so much.............hmmmmmmmmmmm.



Oh and in case you didn't know, hot air baloons are self propelled. Happy sailing.
 

Sierraman

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
299
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
She didn't like you making fun of her. I have taken to the habit of cuttin' the left wing of all my poultry, before, cooking it, or if someone else made, it then before I eat it. I know, I'm superstitous. not usually but in this case... :)
 

passin thru

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
2,603
Reaction score
0
Ok, so you didn't like my joke. Iguess we are even I didn't like your joke(Kerry).

Are you sure someone didn't p____ on your rice krispies.

How was your balloon ride?
 

Disagreeable

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
2,464
Reaction score
0
passin thru said:
Ok, so you didn't like my joke. Iguess we are even I didn't like your joke(Kerry).

Are you sure someone didn't p____ on your rice krispies.

How was your balloon ride?

So you think 30% of our veterans developing mental health problems is funny? You're a pitiful excuse for a human being.
 

passin thru

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
2,603
Reaction score
0
You fool.......................
show me wqhere I said anything about soldiers and their problems being funny.

The problem is you are such an idiot and didn't see I was joking about left wing wacko's


SHOW ME WHERE I MADE FUN OF VETERANS?
 

passin thru

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
2,603
Reaction score
0
THIS IS THE KIND OF STATEMENT WHY NO ONE WILL DEBATE WITH YOU.


I WILL NOT RESPOND TO ANY WACKO CRAP YOU COME UP WITH, BECAUSE YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO SHOW ANY MAKING FUN OF VETERANS. YOU HAVE NO IDEA ABOUT MY SUPPORT FOR VETERANS.
 

Jinglebob

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
5,962
Reaction score
0
Location
Western South Dakota
Disagreeable said:
Link below: my emphasis.

Thirty percent of U.S. troops returning from the Iraq war have developed stress-related mental health problems three to four months after coming home, the Army’s surgeon general said Thursday.

The problems include anxiety, depression, nightmares, anger and an inability to concentrate, said Lt. Gen. Kevin Kiley and other military medical officials. A smaller number of troops, often with more severe symptoms, were diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, a serious mental illness.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8743574/

I imagine it has a lot to do with what they were promised when they joined and what they acctually recieved when they got home or got out.

My son was there for over there for almost a year. He got out in June and has been living with us until fall when he wants to go to college. There sure is a big difference in what they told him they would do for him as far as tuition and what they will acctually do.

We have a wonderful set of young people in our Armed Forces. It's too bad the BS artists in Washington don't back up what they say they will do for them. :mad:

Funny, we call the generation who fought and worked during WW 2 the greatest generation because of the sacrifices they made to free countries from a dictator and now this generation has a chance to do the same and the cry baby, bed wetting liberals don't want to let them or appreciate what they are doing.

You may well be dissagreeable, but you are disgusting and annoy as well.

And as so many others have told you, don't expect me to answer any of your disgusting, dissagreeable postings. No sense in trying to disscuss or argue with an idot who wants to give all of our hard won freedoms away. Why don't you go worship at Bill and Hillary's feet some more? :mad:
 

Steve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
16,547
Reaction score
0
Location
Wildwood New Jersey
After the First Gulf war I was working at little creek in Virginia, I had just returned from my tour on a minesweep, not having my boat back as it was being returned from the Gulf on a heavy lift,. I was assigned to the psd ( personnel support detachment)

My job was to type up ID cards for returnenig soldiers as the Army couldn't handle the numbers, of returning RIFs. clinon in his compasion for returning soldiers was instatuting the largest reduction in force since WWII, I will never forget the distruoght look on most of these soldiers faces. it was as if they were slugged in the gut,, some had just returned after a mandatory two week leave to thier unit and recieved the word...

one soldier left me with a a scene I to this day will never forget...and you wouldn't either,,having a soldier who put his life on the line come back to kill himself in front of me because he was no longer needed is a little more then I can accept...

I have and still do recieve treatment for my "combat service connected" disability at the VA hospital. I see vets every time I go up thier that are treated with the greatest care, and I have never once been denied any treatment,,

the only reason Dis posts this is to incinuate that the Military is not taking care of thier own, and that is not true,
 

nr

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
3,153
Reaction score
0
Location
DE
Steve,
Thank you for your words and the clarification. Having worked at a VA hosp. once awhile back it was great to hear they are giving good service to those like you who have been serving our country with such dedication. Thank you for what you've done and for taking the time to write.
 

Steve

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
16,547
Reaction score
0
Location
Wildwood New Jersey
The procurment process has always "angered" me. part of the problem is the bid process, where "low bid" is accepted often when the low bidder is not qualifiad to complete the contract, and in an effort to get contracts filled the military often is forced to make concessions..

another is the requirements to proved equipment at certian low costs means longer lead time to get equipment...

weather the flac jackets were available or just not at the right unit at the required time is a olojistical problem between the Army and the seperately funded guard or "reserve" units...haveing been an active reservist, I often felt as if the reserve were the last on the list when it came to equipment and often the worst assignments,,,,but none of the complaining gets the structure problems resolved...

One way is better intregation of the reserve units with the regular Army units that provide thier logistical support, this process was tried with the minesweeps in the first gulf war and seemed to work, unfortunatly the process never was fully utilised because it was defunded...

Just as the bulk of the equipment that was needed now should have been procurred long before they were ever needed, due to the lead time in procurement being so long...

as for the Israelis have some great equipment, the lead time to either procure or build would be extensive...the Stryker divisions may fill that hole,,, as well as up armored Humvees

From the Field,


Stryker Performs Well According to Those Whoes Lives Depend on It 4/5/2005 8:50:03 PM

This letter was sent to the Washinton Post in response to an article they ran on the substandard performance of the new Stryker armored fighting vehicle.

I read the article about the Stryker's substandard performance in Mosul with
interest. I offer the readers the following facts based on six months of
fighting a counter-insurgency with Strykers in Mosul, Iraq and ask them to make
their own conclusion. These facts are purely as they apply to one Stryker
Infantry Battalion -- 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, which has operated
in Mosul, Iraq since Oct 2004 with 75 Strykers.

The article
specifically faulted the Stryker's substandard survivability and maintenance to
the point of stating it places soldiers' lives at risk. I would argue that
nothing could be further from the truth.

Since Oct 2004, our
Battalion's Strykers have been engaged with 122 Improvised Explosive Devices
(IEDs), 186 Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPGs), 33 car bombs, of which 10 where
Suicide Car Bombs, and countless mortar and small arms engagements. In November
and December we were fighting an enemy that massed up to 70 insurgents during
attacks. As a result the battalion has had 7 soldiers killed in action and 102
wounded in action (81 of which were able to return to duty within 21 days). The
majority of all casualties have come from doing what the nation expects us to do
- dismounted infantry operations closing with and destroying the enemy.

The insurgents most dangerous and powerful weapon is the suicide car bomb. I
have personally watched 4 of 10 suicide car bombs slam into Strykers creating an
explosion that is equivalent to a 500lb bomb, one of which was a suicide truck
carrying 52 x 155mm rounds (a net explosive weight 10% greater than a 2000lb
JDAM) that detonated within 25m of a Stryker. In all 10 suicide car bomb attacks
we did not lose a single soldiers' life, limb or eyesight for those soldiers
riding on the Stryker.

One example -- Over the last six months, one
Stryker, C21, has been hit by a suicide car bomb, 9 IEDs, 8 RPG direct hits, and
countless small arms. The Infantry squad has had 6 wounded but every soldier is
still in Iraq and still fighting on a daily basis. After each attack, the
Stryker continued to stay in the fight or was repaired in less than 48 hours.


Not only is the Stryker survivable, it is incredibly reliable. Our
75 Strykers each have at least 20,000 miles on them. We average over 1,000 miles
a month on each Stryker and amazingly we average greater than 96% Operational
Readiness rate. That is 3-4 Strykers down at any given time. This is the highest
operational readiness rate of any armored vehicle in the Army inventory. We
average less than 24 hours to refit a vehicle after it has received battle
damage. The electronic computers, monitors, mapping software, weapons cameras
and radios that give us incredible situational awareness average greater than a
94% operational readiness rate.

Much like every other weapon system
the Army has fielded it will continue to get modified and better with time.
Remember, we are on the fifth major modification of the M1 tank. These are the
irrefutable facts without emotion.

Now, let me share with you some
emotion. I have watched this vehicle save my soldiers lives and enable them to
kill our nation's enemies. In urban combat there is no better vehicle for
delivering a squad of infantryman to close with and destroy the enemy. It is
fast, quiet, incredibly survivable, reliable, lethal, and capable of providing
amazing situational awareness. These qualities distinguish it from every other
platform in the Army inventory but most importantly it delivers the most
valuable weapon on the battlefield - a soldier.

Do not just take my
word on the Stryker, ask one of the 700 soldiers in this Battalion which vehicle
they want to go to combat in.

MICHAEL E. KURILLA,
Lieutenant
Colonel
1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment (Stryker Brigade Combat
Team)
MOSUL, IRAQ
 

nr

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
3,153
Reaction score
0
Location
DE
It is no comfort to think our govt. has a habit of going to war without solving the procuremnt problem ever since the Revolutionary War.
 

Disagreeable

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
2,464
Reaction score
0
This was not a procurement problem. Some military units left their tanks and armored vehicles behind when they went to Iraq. Early on, the Marines, for instance, were using only 16 tanks in Iraq of their inventory of 403, and had deployed 39 of their 1,057 assault amphibian vehicles. Why did they leave them behind? Because the Bush Bunch wanted to do this war on the quiet and on the cheap. It has cost us dearly, both in American blood and dollars, as we now pay premiums to get vehicles armored. Humvees were not designed for escorting troops; they were the replacement for a Jeep! I can't tell you how angry it makes me when I see how Bush has totally screwed up this war and what it's done to the Army.
 

Disagreeable

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
2,464
Reaction score
0
And they lie about it. Link below; my emphasis.

"Despite Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld's assertion that the military is outfitting Humvees with armor as quickly as possible, the company providing the vehicles said it has been waiting since September for approval from the Pentagon to increase monthly production by as many as 100 of the all-terrain vehicles, intended to protect against roadside bombs in Iraq."


"But executives at Armor Holdings in Jacksonville, Fla., as well as Army officials and members of Congress, said Rumsfeld's assertion that the protective equipment is being provided as quickly as possible is not true and added the company has been waiting for more purchase orders."


http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/12/10/us_stance_on_armor_disputed/
 

Latest posts

Top